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Suckles

Lamb Shanks

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Hi there ladies & gents,

My first post here. Who can tell me who makes the best lamb shank in Montreal? I would prefer the slowly braised variety. Any kind of resaurant is fine for me, fancy or simlple bistro, expensive or budget.

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I just love the lamb shanks at Le Mas des Oliviers. It is on Bishop street.

They are meltingly tender. Even they would happen not to be on the menu on that day, just ask.

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There is also a decent confit shank at Au Pied de Cochon. It is a little fatty and heavy though, and they tend to serve it barely warmed through.

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Haven't had Picard's confit shank at APDC but his version at Club des Pins — the first in the city? — was mighty fine. That said, the best lamb shank I've run across (also a confit) is at Le P'tit Plateau. Once when talking about duck confit, Chef Loivel, not a braggart by nature, mentioned in passing that after many attempts he'd finally nailed the confit lamb shank. And by golly he did. Tailor made for a cold January night and a rich Gigondas or zinfandel.

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We are lucky as montrealers to be blessed with tons of restaurants that have mastered this dish. Firthermore, those using quebec lamb for lamb dishes are really doing the customer a favour. One critique I have of many chefs is the over use of onions. We must remember that we are in a cold country and we have very bad onions. You can tell that our onions are over acidic by their shelf life. I don't get why chefs will marry our great quebec lamb with our stinky Quebec onions.

I am not a chef by any means, does anyone have an answer for me?

I like the Shank at Le Meac, I believe it is from out west, and the use a higher cut shank., The result is tasty for whatever reason.

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Maybe it's because it is traditional to use local produce to create a local flavor. Instead of complaining that Quebec's onions are "stinky," why not see that as a variation on the theme of onions, and perhaps Quebec lamb and Quebec onions are a nice mix. If you want Italian lamb and Italian onions -- also a nice mix -- go to Italy!


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It is hard I suppose to grow onions here in Quebec the weather is so terrible for crops and produce in general. I have noticed not so much that they are stinky but more sharp/acidic and ultimately not as tasty. I know I am spoild from living in Italy for many years.

I will try out these places for the lamb shank, thank you for the kind suggestions.

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