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Sisserou


kjohn
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Would like to know the origins of the rum.. does'nt say exactly. Looks well presented, though maybe the bottle looks a little too much like cava ..

According to a friend in the industry, its been around for a little while and had a mixed reaction; bit of a marmite product. he still has a bottle of it in his office so I look forward to trying it.

Edited by Bill Poster (log)
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It is telling that the blender doesn't identify the rum. The sisserou is the national bird of Dominica, but I'd guess that if this rum cream is bottled in the UK that the rum is from Barbados or Trinidad, both of which are West Indian rum producers with strong trading ties to the UK.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Finally got to try this last night.

First impressions were so-so; nice coconut flavour, not overpowering but it had a slightly sour cream taste, but this could be down to being old stock, as it had been sitting around(unopened though).

This could be good but it needs re blending. It is too thin( like milk). Needs to be thicker. And hopefully not sour!

My friend submitted a proposal to do marketing and sales. The quote was very good and it was turned down. I don't think this will be around too long

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The latter.. It was a while ago, i think he met the boss at an industry do and put a proposal to her. Half the going rate, and he's v. good

I hope they can make a success of it; the UK market is extremely tough at the moment tho.

Edited by Bill Poster (log)
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The reason I asked if the proposal was solicited is because most new small spirits companies, and companies in general, can't afford to do much, even if it is at half the going rate.

Especially in the early years of a new product life, until there is enough distribution to justify spending money on advertising, it is extremely difficult to find enough money to spend on anything except press coverage which helps build interest and distribution.

As someone who has witnessed numerous startups, I've seen several companies spend too much on publicity before there is adequate distribution to support such expenditures. In the US, as in other markets, distributors don't want to spend their money on new products until there is a market demand. On the other hand, the press doesn't want to write about something that isn't available to their audience.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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The reason I asked if the proposal was solicited is because most new small spirits companies, and companies in general, can't afford to do much, even if it is at half the going rate.

Especially in the early years of a new product life, until there is enough distribution to justify spending money on advertising, it is extremely difficult to find enough money to spend on anything except press coverage which helps build interest and distribution.

As someone who has witnessed numerous startups, I've seen several companies spend too much on publicity before there is adequate distribution to support such expenditures. In the US, as in other markets, distributors don't want to spend their money on new products until there is a market demand. On the other hand, the press doesn't want to write about something that isn't available to their audience. Companies like Moet Hennessey, who are introducing their new 10 Cane Rum, are spending millions to build interest and distribution, a luxury that most private companies don't have. Moet Hennessey also has the luxury of an established distribution network, which allows them to literally force distributors to sell at least some of their new product.

This balancing act between distribution, market demand, and publicity is the reason there are so few rums available in many parts of the world. And we haven't even begun to address the problems of customs and archaic alcohol laws.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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You're right about the balancing act. I've seen $8 million wasted on bad advertising(vodka brand), generating little long term brand awareness

But image building through on trade distribution is a better way to brand awareness.

It is essential to have a budget to pay a good sales guy to introduce your brand to the bar managers and distributors straight away(even just for the first 6 months)

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