Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
japanesegeek

children at Clio's

Recommended Posts

I'm taking a friend out for a celebratory dinner. He's bringing his two sons (ages two and four). I'm hoping that Clio will work out well, I've been a few times and always loved it but didn't notice any kids -- not that I was looking. Any thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bring a babysitter so when the kids get antsy someone can take them out for a walk around the block.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were paying that kind of money to have a "gourmet" experience, and a 2-year old kid at the next table started shrieking, I would be extremely pissed. I don't understand why one would want to take children so young to a restaurant like Clio. There is nothing on the menu they would want to eat. Get a babysitter and leave them at home!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I were paying that kind of money to have a "gourmet" experience, and a 2-year old kid at the next table started shrieking, I would be extremely pissed.  I don't understand why one would want to take children so young to a restaurant like Clio.  There is nothing on the menu they would want to eat.  Get a babysitter and leave them at home!

FYI, not all two year olds shriek and many will enjoy some of the interesting things Clio offers. You assume too much.

Children might especially enjoy the interesting platings they do there.

One option that's worked well for us is to order one course ahead for the kids. So, get a starter for them during your aperitif, dinner during your starter and dessert during your meal. It might help to keep them focused and off your lap/back so you can enjoy your meals.

There was a great story in Gourmet several years back about a couple bringing their child to a very high end NYC restaurant. They had the realization that a young child is very similar to a wealthy, spoiled adult. They want what they want when they want it. Period. So, the restaurant bent over backwards to cater to every whim of the child. Not what I'd do, but a funny story nonetheless.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on the children. Are they used to dining in a formal setting and staying seated quietly through an entire meal? 2-year-olds and 4-year-olds differ. My children were dining in formal restaurants at that age, and they behaved so well that my husband and I were always complimented on their behavior. We also made sure to dine at an earlier-than-usual hour starting, say, 5:30, or 6:30 at latest.

If you don't know these children well enough to be sure of their comportment at dinner, I would not risk disturbing other diners. I'd get a babysitter or choose another restaurant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If I were paying that kind of money to have a "gourmet" experience, and a 2-year old kid at the next table started shrieking, I would be extremely pissed.  I don't understand why one would want to take children so young to a restaurant like Clio.  There is nothing on the menu they would want to eat.  Get a babysitter and leave them at home!

FYI, not all two year olds shriek and many will enjoy some of the interesting things Clio offers. You assume too much.

Children might especially enjoy the interesting platings they do there.

One option that's worked well for us is to order one course ahead for the kids. So, get a starter for them during your aperitif, dinner during your starter and dessert during your meal. It might help to keep them focused and off your lap/back so you can enjoy your meals.

There was a great story in Gourmet several years back about a couple bringing their child to a very high end NYC restaurant. They had the realization that a young child is very similar to a wealthy, spoiled adult. They want what they want when they want it. Period. So, the restaurant bent over backwards to cater to every whim of the child. Not what I'd do, but a funny story nonetheless.

And should we be indulging children by treating them like wealthy, spoiled adults? What a waste to take a 2 year old to a restaurant where they serve Jerusalem Artichoke soup for $14, Lacquered Foie Gras with bee pollen for $20 (both apps). The only thing I saw on the menu that a child might like is Braised Organic Chicken with artichokes barigoule, lemon and green olive butter for $28. Forget the Allspice Crusted Venison with red beets, fresh juniper and matsutake mushrooms for $36. Does it make sense to spend this kind of money on a palate just weaned off formula?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it makes sense to bring a young child to a high end restaurant, if that's what the parents want to do. That move by itself is not treating them like wealthy, spoiled adults, BTW.

Why can't a young child try and enjoy something like the items you've mentioned?

How do you know what a child you know nothing of will like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is true that sometimes history repeats itself regarding children in restaurants, then there is a possibilitiy this thread may spin out of control as others have.

Just my two cents but I can't help but believe the reason why fast food chains are so popular is due to the choices we make as parents.

We teach our children to like chicken nuggets. By choice likely not in most cases. But because it is convenient and fast and most of all easy!!

Some believe it would be a waste to spend $36 on a child in a fine restaurant,but in my opinion it is a waste of the childs palate(and health) to spend 99 cents on chicken nuggets.

Now I do realize my views on this subject is likely not the majority. But my personal belief is for example last month I ate at the French Laundry and if there was a baby crying next to me, oh well. Thats life! And it is their world just as much as it is mine. And the only place I think a child should not be is a unsafe enviroment.

But I must respect others opinions so I would say if you know your child then go for it and enjoy yourself at Clio.

My children have been eating Wylie Dufresne food long before he became the popular celebrity chef he is today. Thank God I did not feed them canned pasta.

Robert


Robert R

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would go early, 5 or 5:30. I would also tell the staff when you make the reservation that there will be two small children, just to be sure they know. We have a two year old and after one unhappy experience where we were turned away, despite our reservation, from a (not so high end) restaurant in Portland, ME with a "no children" policy, I ALWAYS make sure to mention it in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there Japanesegeek,

I am a garde manger cook at Clio for the summer. (I am still in school.)

Of course. If the children would like to have the menu, that would be awesome.

But from the past, when the child didn't want food from the menu.

We made simple pasta with chicken.

I am not sure if that is just a set solution for children or the guests simply requested it.

When is your reservation? Please let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We started our kids out very early in nice restaurants. That said, we would try to get a table when the restaurant opened and on quiet nights. We ate lots of meals at 5:30 or 6:00 on Sunday nights, but by the age of three, both of our girls knew what was acceptable behavior at a restaurant.

At 7 and 12 ("almost 13!!!") they love going out to eat, and we still get complements. Both girls cut their culinary teeth at Zanghi in Westport, CT, and we were never not welcome. An added plus of learning how to eat out is that the kids get to try lots of different things. They see that eating is an adventure and exciting, and I think their palates benefit.

Seeing that there is now an official reply from Clio, I say go for it. be respectful of the other patrons, and don't be afraid to cut your losses. You can always pack up the food and wine, and finish dinner at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for their advice. Reservations are for tomorrow night. I have some apprehension, the boys are generally good but not angels, but their father and I used to dine out all the time before he had children so now need to get him and his new family back in the swing of things. :)

Rough edges are not unlikely, although I'll do what I can ahead of time to make sure they are in a good mood when the night begins. No worries though for any fellow customers at Clio tomorrow, if the boys can't behave, I won't hesitate to have Clio pack us a big doggie bag and go home. ;)


Edited by japanesegeek (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks everyone for their advice.  Reservations are for tomorrow night.  I have some apprehension, the boys are generally good but not angels, but their father and I used to dine out all the time before he had children so now need to get him and his new family back in the swing of things. :)

Rough edges are not unlikely, although I'll do what I can ahead of time to make sure they are in a good mood when the night begins.  No worries though for any fellow customers at Clio tomorrow, if the boys can't behave, I won't hesitate to have Clio pack us a big doggie bag and go home.  ;)

Fair warning: portions are tiny, so the doggie bag will be small! Have fun--I don't really hate kids--just like toying with their over-indulgent parents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am a garde manger cook at Clio for the summer.

I'm totally still replaying in my mind the pork plate i ate at clio about two years ago. the pork plate was so good, so fine, so memorable, that sometimes i think: hey, should i make a pork plate for guests?

the belly was particularly wonderful. the shreds were fab. god what else was there? i just remember it as a wonderland of pork, the total star of the dinner!

x

marlena


Edited by marlena spieler (log)

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I know which pork plate you are talking about.

Unfortunately it has been replaced by a different pork plate.

Japanesegeek,

I had Thursday (today) off today. Didn't get to use the internet until now.

How was your dining experience?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a good time. A different experience then dining just with adults, but went off without a hitch, the boys were well-behaved (bribed with promises of dessert). I'll post a review of the food later, but let me just say that the service was excellent and the whole staff at least appeared happy to entertain the boys.


Edited by japanesegeek (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that pork plate as well. There was a single crisp piece of skin that was shockingly good.

If you could, Fudy, tell Orion and Brooke that Andrew Baber said hi.


Andrew Baber

True I got more fans than the average man but not enough loot to last me

to the end of the week, I live by the beat like you live check to check

If you don't move yo' feet then I don't eat, so we like neck to neck

A-T-L, Georgia, what we do for ya?

The Gentleman Gourmand

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...