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What were they thinking when they named it . . .


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Hey haggis is way better then lots of stuff. Like Indian desserts for instance. :wink:

On topic. Sicily seems to be particularly good at naming dishes after body functions, parts or waste products. shitty lasagne, angels pricks etc. From Liguria you have "gnocchi like dog turds" (ricotta and chard or spinach).

Lots of desserts are named after nuns bits or bits of nuns.

One sicilian classic: Ossi De Morti = the bones of the dead.

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Hey haggis is way better then lots of stuff. Like Indian desserts for instance. :wink:

On topic. Sicily seems to be particularly good at naming dishes after body functions, parts or waste products. shitty lasagne, angels pricks etc. From Liguria you have "gnocchi like dog turds" (ricotta and chard or spinach).

Lots of desserts are named after nuns bits or bits of nuns.

:wacko: ACK.........

TMI...............

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Maybe right now would be the best time to make a notation of the dish "Iman Bayeldi" (?)

Translation: The Preacher Fainted.

Not from embarrassment, surely. A hot summer's day in Naples can be a tad overwhelming . . .

It would depend on the preacher, it is to be imagined.

The heat? Embarrassment? Shock? Perhaps. . .pleasure? :biggrin:

These things are all so inextricably entwined, particularly in religious types. :wink:

Well, it's meant to be a Muslim imam, not an Italian priest.

There are two versions I know of as to why he fainted. One was from pleasure at the taste of the dish, the other was because he was utterly stingy, and he fainted from shock upon finding out how much expensive olive oil had been used up in one single dish.

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Maybe right now would be the best time to make a notation of the dish "Iman Bayeldi" (?)

Translation: The Preacher Fainted.

Not from embarrassment, surely. A hot summer's day in Naples can be a tad overwhelming . . .

It would depend on the preacher, it is to be imagined.

The heat? Embarrassment? Shock? Perhaps. . .pleasure? :biggrin:

These things are all so inextricably entwined, particularly in religious types. :wink:

Well, it's meant to be a Muslim imam, not an Italian priest.

There are two versions I know of as to why he fainted. One was from pleasure at the taste of the dish, the other was because he was utterly stingy, and he fainted from shock upon finding out how much expensive olive oil had been used up in one single dish.

And it's a Turkish dish. (Well, also a Greek dish, but given the name...)

By the way, at least to my Malay understanding of Arabic borrow words in that language:

Iman = faith in Allah.

Imam = Muslim equivalent of a minister or rabbi; i.e., leader of a congregation with all that entails (well, for Sunni Muslims; Imam has a very different meaning for Shi'ahs).

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Indian Desserts???  They are horrible.. :wacko:  :shock: 

You are joking, right? I mean, ALL of them? Even kulfi??? Or a delicate rice pudding, nicely chillled, and perfumed gently with rose water??

Come to Berlin, and I will feed you Indian desserts which will change your mind.

Getting back to the topic of this thread, I always loved the name 'priest chokers' (strangolapreti). This is another one with two explanations I know of: one, that the priest is so greedy, and the food so delicious, that he will gobble them down so rapidly he'll choke on them. The second explanation is that the dumplings are rather rough and sturdy, and therefore a priest - who has it would seem a more refined gullet than the hale and hearty peasants who are presumably serving him the dish - is more likely to choke on it.

Funny, I'd always thought of it as spinach and bread dumplings from Trentino, but just looked in Ada Boni, and she has it as a sweet baked dish from the Veneto containing sponge cake, nuts, and dried fruits.

And then there's also this version as well.

Along the same lines, there are not just lots of references to nuns in Italian food names, but also to priests. There are also 'drowned Cappuchin monks' (!), which is essentially a French toast with additional flavorings (coffee in one version, red wine in another). But not the most appetizing name. :blink:

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Funny, I'd always thought of it as spinach and bread dumplings from Trentino, but just looked in Ada Boni, and she has it as a sweet baked dish from the Veneto containing sponge cake, nuts, and dried fruits.

And then there's also this version as well.

Just as "There is more than one way to skin a rabbit", there is more than one way to strangle a priest. :smile:

An amusing topic for thought.

.......................................................

And I must agree with you about Indian desserts. Those nine-out-of-ten Scotsmen obviously must be Heathens. Or perhaps their faculties have been affected by the whiskey(?) :wink:

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.......................................................

And I must agree with you about Indian desserts. Those nine-out-of-ten Scotsmen obviously must be Heathens. Or perhaps their faculties have been affected by the whiskey(?) :wink:

ooohh 9 out of 10 scotsmen, i am soooo convinced, totally :raz:

what was i thinking (where's the emoticon for 'slaps self on forehead')

tell you what, as a sign of my absolute conversion to the cult of

haggis, i will expiate my former heresy

by sacrificing my share and that of my descendants unto

the 19th generation to those 9 / 10 scotties.

in return, send me all the indian desserts you don't like...

that will be a very suitable penance, oh the horror....

:laugh::laugh:

milagai

(not milagi)

Edited by Milagai (log)
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Funny, I'd always thought of it as spinach and bread dumplings from Trentino, but just looked in Ada Boni, and she has it as a sweet baked dish from the Veneto containing sponge cake, nuts, and dried fruits.

And then there's also this version as well.

Just as "There is more than one way to skin a rabbit", there is more than one way to strangle a priest. :smile:

An amusing topic for thought.

.......................................................

And I must agree with you about Indian desserts. Those nine-out-of-ten Scotsmen obviously must be Heathens. Or perhaps their faculties have been affected by the whiskey(?) :wink:

That would be "Whisky", you Irish imperialist. :wink:

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That would be "Whisky", you Irish imperialist.  :wink:

I am tempted to shout out "Food Fight! Food Fight!"

But knowing this crowd, rather than slinging the foods across the cafeteria, we'd all start asking for a bite instead.

The other way is better for keeping the calories off, but. . .hmmm. Yes, please, a tot of Whiskey, a bite of haggis, a mouthful of an Indian dessert. . .with stories told while we eat of the histories of all these things? That sounds good to me. :smile:

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Indian Desserts???  They are horrible.. :wacko:  :shock: 

You are joking, right? I mean, ALL of them? Even kulfi??? Or a delicate rice pudding, nicely chillled, and perfumed gently with rose water??

Come to Berlin, and I will feed you Indian desserts which will change your mind.

I don't like rose water. and the Kulfi I got served was just some boring ice cream. Not very bad, but definitley not the best. And then there's those sticky deep fried cookies that are really hot and is so sticky they get stuck in your mouth and burn your tounge. Not fan of those "milk balls" either. But I have probably been unlucky in chosing what places I ate those things. There's probably some people and some dishes that are better!

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Indian Desserts???  They are horrible.. :wacko:  :shock: 

You are joking, right? I mean, ALL of them? Even kulfi??? Or a delicate rice pudding, nicely chillled, and perfumed gently with rose water??

Come to Berlin, and I will feed you Indian desserts which will change your mind.

I don't like rose water. and the Kulfi I got served was just some boring ice cream. Not very bad, but definitley not the best. And then there's those sticky deep fried cookies that are really hot and is so sticky they get stuck in your mouth and burn your tounge. Not fan of those "milk balls" either. But I have probably been unlucky in chosing what places I ate those things. There's probably some people and some dishes that are better!

Whereas Adam and I would argue that haggis is universally excellent.

from the thinly veneered desk of:

Jamie Maw

Food Editor

Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com

Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

"Profumo profondo della mia carne"

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Indian Desserts???  They are horrible.. :wacko:  :shock: 

You are joking, right? I mean, ALL of them? Even kulfi??? Or a delicate rice pudding, nicely chillled, and perfumed gently with rose water??

Come to Berlin, and I will feed you Indian desserts which will change your mind.

I don't like rose water. and the Kulfi I got served was just some boring ice cream. Not very bad, but definitley not the best. And then there's those sticky deep fried cookies that are really hot and is so sticky they get stuck in your mouth and burn your tounge. Not fan of those "milk balls" either. But I have probably been unlucky in chosing what places I ate those things. There's probably some people and some dishes that are better!

Whereas Adam and I would argue that haggis is universally excellent.

Good God no! Canned Haggis is a crime against humanity! :wink:

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Indian Desserts???  They are horrible.. :wacko:  :shock: 

You are joking, right? I mean, ALL of them? Even kulfi??? Or a delicate rice pudding, nicely chillled, and perfumed gently with rose water??

Come to Berlin, and I will feed you Indian desserts which will change your mind.

I don't like rose water. and the Kulfi I got served was just some boring ice cream. Not very bad, but definitley not the best. And then there's those sticky deep fried cookies that are really hot and is so sticky they get stuck in your mouth and burn your tounge. Not fan of those "milk balls" either. But I have probably been unlucky in chosing what places I ate those things. There's probably some people and some dishes that are better!

Whereas Adam and I would argue that haggis is universally excellent.

Good God no! Canned Haggis is a crime against humanity! :wink:

Definitly.. The more freshly made, the better! Idealy served with mashed potatoes, mashed suede and a selection of the finest Single Malts. It's bliss!

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Whereas Adam and I would argue that haggis is universally excellent.

Well God bless ya, then. Even in Scotland, this creation would not touch my lips. My mother is from the bonnie braes of Inverness, and she won't even eat it.

:wink:

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ok.. I'm very late in this thread.. But I have to get this out haha

Here in Sweden; there's a type of candy in shape of small ball rolled in coconut shavings; consisting of butter, cocoa, coconut, oatmeal and sugar that's called..: "Negro Balls"

Yup you heard right. Very recently there was a debate if you should ban that name or not because of racism.

Edited by Hector (log)
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  • 3 weeks later...

Imam Bayildi (actually there should be no dots on the i's but I won't make you all change your encoding): I've read a lot of back-and-forth about this name, why he fainted. Actually, it's just a common Turkish expression, meaning to like something a lot. Çıkolataya bayılıyorum means literally "I faint to chocolate" but what it really means is "I'm nut's about chocolate."

Strange names (if we get into international bad food names, we might need to start a new thread....). In Serbia there is a type of cake called "Plazma Keks"

"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

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Re Kiwifruit....

New Zealanders are creative when it comes to changing the names of foods to improve sales:

Orange Roughy was originally known as slimefish.

Edited by Brigit Binns (log)

Please visit my new blog, Roadfoodie.

There's driving, and then there's Driving.

The chronicles of a food-obsessed traveler: her exploits, meals, and musings along the highways of America and beyond.

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New Zealanders are creative when it comes to changing the names of foods to improve sales:

Orange Roughy was originally known as slimefish.

Just like Sablefish tastes oh, so much better than Alaskan Black Cod. :wink:

And Chilean Seabass was, once upon a time, formerly known as Patagonian Toothfish. Now, if only the name could be changed back, perhaps they'd stop overfishing it to the point of near-extinction.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Let's not forget the other British favorite, faggots.

Faggot Fans from BBC

Oh, the Brits are right: Faggots are very tasty.

But what's this stuff about them being made from pork liver and pork?

--Sandy, who's sure that somewhere in merrie olde England, right now, some klutz of a cook is burning a faggot

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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Re Kiwifruit....

New Zealanders are creative when it comes to changing the names of foods to improve sales:

Orange Roughy was originally known as slimefish.

Orange Roughy is not exactly a wonderful improvement.

Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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