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arjay

EGGS....the chicken variety

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I think eggs are great, in any of their preparations. If you are also fond of them, please tell me how you like them, and if it is unusual, please relate how they are prepared.


Martinis don't come from vodka and bacon don't come from turkeys!

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If cholesterol were not an issue in my life, I think I could eat an omelette for breakfast every day for the rest of my life and never get bored of 'em. There's just so many bazillions of things you can do to an omelette.

And it wasn't until I moved down here to Southern California that I discovered that divine meat-and-eggs concoction known as machaca con huevos. Heart attack on a platter, no doubt, but I still refuse to give it up (as an occasional indulgence, at any rate).

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I had to explian to someone whay egg foo yung (sp?) was last week, and described it as a "heart attack on a platter." Deep-fried omelette with an oil and starch based sauce. At least i don't get the pork version. :)

-Jason

If cholesterol were not an issue in my life, I think I could eat an omelette for breakfast every day for the rest of my life and never get bored of 'em. There's just so many bazillions of things you can do to an omelette.

And it wasn't until I moved down here to Southern California that I discovered that divine meat-and-eggs concoction known as machaca con huevos. Heart attack on a platter, no doubt, but I still refuse to give it up (as an occasional indulgence, at any rate).


-Jason

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johnnybird loves his eggses

1 egg scrambled in a cup

dumped into a small pam that has been coated with non-stick spray

that was heated on high

turn down to medium

slather one piece of cheap white bread with mayo

several grinds of white pepper and sea salt; turn down to medium heat and flip the egg

drizzle the other piece of cheap white bread with ketchup

turn stove off and flip the egg onto the bread

eat

about 5 years ago with this regimine we got johnnybirds cholesterol up over his weight - it's about 133 now


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I'll get back to you after I've finished counting the pleats on my toque.

I think there are double the recipes in North African cooking.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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I too ADORE eggs. When I first lived in Britain a million years ago the eggs were so awful (they tasted fishy) and dangerous (salmonella was a problem in one out of three eggs), and also they were raised intenively, sooooooooo i went abroad for my eggs! I used to always bring eggs back from France, or Greece especially; these were my favourite places for good eggs. had a special plastic container to carry them in and all.

But my FAVOURITE dish of eggs is: 2 fresh fresh eggs cooked in lashings of blissfully delicious unsalted butter, topped with a flurry, a pile, a mountain, of fragrant, shaved, WHITE TRUFFLES.

You have to eat them no more than about 5 minutes where they have been found, cause only fresh ones will do in this dish, and they begin to lose their deliciousness from the moment they are unearthed.

i am getting goosepimples thinking about the fact that its nearly august, and sept follows august, and then comes october, and in ALBA that means one thing.

mmmmmmmmmmm.

marlena

ps chakchouka is pretty fantastic too. Chef Zadi, do you love it as much as I do? and mememen, and asparagus eggs benedict with truffle hollandaise (my recipe), and a poached egg on a bed of rice with homemade salsa, and a brik, a delicious brik a l'oeuf which whenever i make or eat i think: why don't i do this more often?

gotta go, its breakfast time and while i'm not usually an egg for breakfast person, somehow this morning its sounding very good. huevos rancheros, thats the thing for this morning!


Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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and Bulgaria Skopska cheese: roasted feta with peppers and tomatoes and onion, with a couple of eggs cooked in it.

and spanish tortillas/italian frittatas. artichoke. eggplant. potato. chorizo. peas. asparagus.

and wild mushrooms with baby peas scrambled with fresh eggs til only soft and creamy. eat spooned over toasted poilane bread.

x marlena

ps and a poached egg in soup, esp parmesan broth a la WD-50.


Edited by marlena spieler (log)

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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I used to make really tasty scrambled egg dishes. When I think of one thing that I like and simply can't get unless I started cooking again, that's it. I usually made them in an Italian-influened style. I started by frying chopped onions in a small amount of extra virgin olive oil, then added minced garlic. Later, I added chopped tomatoes and fresh basil or Italian parsley. Then, I added the eggs (at least two but usually three) and stirred everything up. I then added some tasty cheese (fior di latte, provolone, parmigiano) in pieces, mixed everything up again for evenness, stirred in some ground pepper and dried basil and oregano (if no fresh herbs were available), then added wine. Once the cheese was fully melted, everything was fully mixed up, and the sauce was reduced, and my taste buds told me the proportions were good, I toasted some whole wheat or sprouted wheat or oatmeal bread (at least two slices), and scopped the cheesy, eggy, tasty mixture on the toast, adding more pepper to taste. The best version I ever made included a certain amount of leftovers of a Portuguese-style (I think) beef stew my mother made with red wine, and I unfortunately was never able to duplicate that (all amounts were always approximate in this dish), but I made good ones many times. It was a very hearty brunch or lunch on weekends or other days when I had time to make it.


Michael aka "Pan

 

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I like to scramble them (with cream or cheese), and roll in a whole-wheat tortilla with labna or really good sour yogurt. With cilantro or cilantro chutney, maybe some roasted red peppers.

I used to make "farmer's breakfast" for my kids--slice and fry potatoes; when they're almost done add chopped onion, then eggs and cheese. The kids called it "slop." Looked awful, tasted good.

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You have to eat them no more than about 5 minutes where they have been found, cause only fresh ones will do in this dish, and they begin to lose their deliciousness from the moment they are unearthed. 

I hope you're referring to the truffles rather than the eggs. :laugh:

Actually, the freshness of the eggs is also important, though I don't think you necessarily need to be five minutes from the chicken. :wink: I've got three reliable sources for organic free-range fresh eggs - fresh meaning gathered this morning. Duck eggs too, though that's another topic....

As for the poached egg at WD50, is that the one poached at super-low temperature? I've tried doing that several times without much success. I fully intend to try Dufresne's version - I'm sure it will be a revelation.

My favorite egg dishes usually feature poached or coddled eggs. I like the soft, delicate texture of a gently cooked egg. Another fave: pasta carbonara - the eggiest, smoothest sauce ever, provided you don't make a scrambled mess of it.

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You have to eat them no more than about 5 minutes where they have been found, cause only fresh ones will do in this dish, and they begin to lose their deliciousness from the moment they are unearthed. 

I've got three reliable sources for organic free-range fresh eggs - fresh meaning gathered this morning. Duck eggs too, though that's another topic....

My favorite egg dishes usually feature poached or coddled eggs. I like the soft, delicate texture of a gently cooked egg. Another fave: pasta carbonara - the eggiest, smoothest sauce ever, provided you don't make a scrambled mess of it.

I have 9 reliable sources for fresh free range organic eggs, and when the pullets I ordered this spring begin to lay in a couple of months, I will have 25 more sources.

I love pasta carbonara too, but probably my favorite way to eat eggs is over easy in butter, with a nice slice of homemade bread, toasted a bit.

I also love egg drop soup and fried rice. Do noodles and spaetzle count as egg dishes?


sparrowgrass

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Here's what I ate for brunch yesterday, and it was AMAZING! An omelette made with 4 egg whites and one yolk (I'm a member of the whisk it with some water brigade), filled with fresh sliced tomatoes sauteed with a sliced yellow onion and a huge fistful of fresh flat leaf parsley, then sauced with buttermilk! Oh, MyMyMy, it was too yummy! I ate a hunk of rye toasted in the oven, too. But that's another thread. So, my final addition to this thread is: Eggs with buttermilk!


More Than Salt

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I have 9 reliable sources for fresh free range organic eggs, and when the pullets I ordered this spring begin to lay in a couple of months, I will have 25 more sources.

Hah, I didn't count the individual hens! :laugh:

Cool that you're raising your own. Can't get more control over quality than that.

The egg-over-easy with toasted homemade bread is my Sunday morning standard. This weekend the bread is sourdough rye, and the eggs are from Blue Egg Farm.

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I used to make "farmer's breakfast" for my kids--slice and fry potatoes; when they're almost done add chopped onion, then eggs and cheese. The kids called it "slop." Looked awful, tasted good.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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It’s wrong. I know… But I really like to eat eggs with fried tortillas.

I start with enough hot corn oil in a large cast iron pan. I add 2-3 small taco-sized corn tortillas cut into wedges. I fry the tortillas until mostly crisp. Then I add 2 eggs and let the white set slightly before scrambling them into the tortillas.

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On the last day of a camping trip, trying to clear the cooler, I diced and fried the last few slices of bacon, stirred up the rest of the carton of eggs, and scrambled them with the bacon. The remainder of the cheese was melted on top.

When I dished it up for the kids, one refused to eat it. "Looks like cat barf", he said. (He relented, after big brother reached for his plate.)

Cat barf was a family staple for years.


sparrowgrass

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Soft-boiled eggs, coated in panko and nuts, flash-fried and split, with a little sea salt and hazlenut oil on the runny yolk. Amazing.


"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office

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hard boiled and pickled............

the brine can be almost anything as long as it's hot as hell........

nothin like a few of those with some icy beer after work..................

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The better question is, how do I NOT like eggs? :wub: I can't think of a single way!

My absolute favorites are nothing fancy:

- devilled. 'nuff said.

- poached atop any variety of supporting cast members.

- overeasy, cooked in bacon drippings, mopped up with a side of medium brown toast.

Guess what I'm having for dinner? :cool:


Nikki Hershberger

An oyster met an oyster

And they were oysters two.

Two oysters met two oysters

And they were oysters too.

Four oysters met a pint of milk

And they were oyster stew.

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If there's some warm rice left in the rice cooker and the fridge is completely empty, sometimes I'll go for a Japanese staple: fried egg on top of rice, with a little soy sauce poured over the egg.

Runny yolks, hot rice, a touch of shoyu. Mmmm.


Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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Hmmmmm....

- Jean Georges' Egg Caviar

- Eggs scrambled with half and half, cooked gently in a double boiler (they get all custardy...)

- Spaghetti carbonara

Oh, man. Now I'm hungry!!!


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Sauteed onion and green pepper, eggs scrambled in, then rolled into a warm flour tortilla. Cool sour cream or salsa for dipping. My avowedly redneck BIL asks often, "When you going to make some of those BOO-reedos?"

And a morning staple when the kids were in school: the one-eyed sandwich.

Cut a little round out of the bread slice, fry gently in a little butter, then break in an egg. Gently flip to cook other side. Pass the honeybear for making a circle round the edges of the bread, careful not to get any on the egg.

And hash nests: Chop leftover corned beef, fry gently with onions, peppers, diced potatoes til everything's tender. Make indentations in hash, break an egg in each one...salt and pepper eggs. Bake in low oven til whites are firm and yolks still softly runny.

And one more, from a friend's repertoire...messy but delicious: Pour an 8 oz. container of whipping cream into a buttered pie plate. Break in as many eggs as will fit without overflowing the pan. Sprinkle eggs with salt and pepper. Completely cover eggs and cream with thin-sliced Gruyere or Fontina; bake til cream bubbles and eggs are softly cooked. Serve over toasted Engish muffins with asparagus or spinach or broiled tomatoes.

Or eat right out of the pan with a spoon. :wub:

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And a morning staple when the kids were in school:  the one-eyed sandwich.

Cut a little round out of the bread slice, fry gently in a little butter, then break in an egg.  Gently flip to cook other side.  Pass the honeybear for making a circle round the edges of the bread, careful not to get any on the egg. 

Known as "Egg in a Hat" (??) in our house......still my 21 year old's favorite "Mommy" food :wub:

Pour an 8 oz. container of whipping cream into a buttered pie plate.    Break in as many eggs as will fit without overflowing the pan.  Sprinkle eggs with salt and pepper.  Completely cover eggs and cream with thin-sliced Gruyere or Fontina; bake til cream bubbles and eggs are softly cooked.  Serve over toasted Engish muffins with asparagus or spinach or broiled tomatoes.

Or eat right out of the pan with a spoon. :wub:

OMG.....that sounds so good it should go in the Guilty Pleasures, thread ! I gotta try this on Sunday ! :biggrin:

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Cut a little round out of the bread slice, fry gently in a little butter, then break in an egg.  Gently flip to cook other side.  Pass the honeybear for making a circle round the edges of the bread, careful not to get any on the egg. 

Alright, so happens to that little round? Two-eyed egg?


Edited by sanrensho (log)

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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Mmmm, eggses...I like 'em numerous ways: soft-boiled on toast, soft-scrambled with fresh morels, in egg salad (made with Dijon mustard, mayo, bits of crispy bacon and sliced Spanish olives), and fried on top of fried rice, Thai-style. Yum.


There is no sincerer love than the love of food. -- George Bernard Shaw

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