• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
mudbug

Brown Bean Paste : Yellow Bean Paste

23 posts in this topic

Brown Bean Paste : Yellow Bean Paste

What do you like to use it for, sauce, marinade, rub, primarily for pork and beef?

Any dishes that just wouldn't be the same without it?

Do you prefer brown to yellow or vise versa?

What brand do you rely on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brown Bean Paste : Yellow Bean Paste

What do you like to use it for, sauce, marinade, rub, primarily for pork and beef?

Any dishes that just wouldn't be the same without it?

Do you prefer brown to yellow or vise versa?

What brand do you rely on?

Brown Bean Sauce/Yellow Bean Sauce (or paste)are the same thing. Whatever name it is called, it is a paste made from yellow soy beans, fermented and seasonings added.

I had chicken with brown bean paste last night, and I like eggplant with brown bean sauce, also.

I'm loyal to brands. I started with Koon Chun and it is my preferred brand for this. Also, I use the regular bean sauce, rather than the 'ground' version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to buy brown bean sauce ( man see/ mean see?) in a large 48 oz cans. I can't remember the brand, but now, I have a jar of whole bean brown bean sauce by YEO'S in the fridge.

Haven't tried eggplant with this, but it sounds good!

I use it with pork ribs and plums in brine. Mix a couple spoonfuls into the ribs. Let it marinate then top with pieces of these salty plums. Steam for about 30 minutes and eat with lots of rice. Mouth is watering and we just got back from eating out!

I also use it to make BBQ duck. Mom uses it for siu jook. :smile:

Sister-in-law uses it with chicken for baos.


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Besides all the good suggestions, my favourite is a fish, preferably whole, preferably sole or flounder or any delicately fleshed fish steamed with "min see" and a few slivers of ginger and scallions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The brown bean sauce is fairly generic. From my experience the taste of brown bean sauce from many of the major manufacturers are about the same. Koon Chun, Yeo's, Lee Kum Kee... It is seldomly used alone. Most often it is used along with other ingredients such as garlic, hoisin sauce, five spice, etc. as a marinade or as an ingredient to make the "brown" sauce.

While the Cantonese use brown bean sauce in steamed fish, Northern Chinese (not sure where exactly, let's say it's North of Canton (GuangDong) :raz: ) use brown bean sauce to make "Sweet and Sour Fish". The fish is breaded and deep-fried first (or just shallow-fried without bread over slow fire in home cooking). The brown sauce is made by saute'ing some garlic, ginger, brown bean sauce, hoisin sauce, vinegar, sugar, water, and thickened with corn starch solution. Chopped green onions on top at the end as a garnish. Some versions of this, called "Ng Lau" [Cantonese], or Five Willows - five ingredients in thin shreds, add shredded daikon, carrots, celery, black mushrooms, or other vegetables (pre-cooked first) in the sauce and pour on top of the fish.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brown and Yellow Bean Paste? I've never heard of these before, much less used them in cooking. A quick Google Image Search gives me blobs of stuff.

As for fish, at home, we use LKK Black Bean Garlic Sauce.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bean paste in ayam pongteh(a nyonya chicken stew), I love it! Scroll down to the 5th recipe. You can add shiitake mushrooms if you like.


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, i am rattling from my brain as i go...

There are many types of bean paste available in chinese cooking.

The most common would be the type that is made from soy beans, which some will called "yellow bean paste/ brown bean paste/ fermented bean paste".

From the basic paste that is made from the soy bean, it can be further diversified into

1) sweet bean paste

2) salty bean paste

3) hot bean paste

not to be confused with the korean "gochujang" or the japanese "miso". although basic ingredients is the same, which is the soybean, the taste are greatly varified.

so, when you are cooking a recipe, look very carefully wether it is stating salt, sweet or hot. This is a personal experience... I didn't pay enough attention and added salty bean paste when it should be sweet. :)

Then we also have the black bean paste which is more pungent and are generally salty and are made from fermented black beans. From the basic black bean paste, you can also purchase some other type of black bean paste like, hot black bean paste and the more popular among asians, "hot black bean paste with garlic". I like to use that to cook my clams with some lemongrass, bird's eye chilli, sliced galangal, some oyster sauce, kaffir lime leaves, garlic and shallot. and some dried shrimp. fantastic with piping hot rice.

The Hokkien called the bean paste "Taucu" the Cantonese will called it "Tau See".

The black version is called "hark tau see"

hope this helps some! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Hokkien called the bean paste "Taucu" the Cantonese will called it "Tau See".

The black version is called "hark tau see"

Welcome, mflo. I look forward to reading your perspective of Chinese cooking.

One small note: In Cantonese, as in Mandarin, the pronounciation is "Dau" (with a D instead of a T - In Mandarin it is Dou) for beans. "Dau See" [Cantonese] - fermented black beans.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A thousand apologies, hz, while I crush your small note like a tau see. Msian/Sporeans tend to spell it with a 'T' rather than a 'D'. After all, the sound is a cross between the 2. When we spell it with a 'T', we don't say the word through our teeth like an actual 'T' sound, but rather with the tongue behind the top teeth. Blunt sound. A 'D' sound would be placing the tongue too far back.

Another kinky example is the confused spelling for words which is a cross between B and P sounds, like 'white' in cantonese. It's not a clear-white 'B' or 'P' sound, is it?

This is getting to be too funny! Talking chinese in english! :raz::laugh: We're all turning into bananas, if we're not one already!


Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let this "banana" wade into the beans here:

dau see is one way of pronouncing fermented black beans. Tau see may be a variation if you are outside of HK. :blink:

hark tau see would specifically indicate black fermented soy beans to a novice. Most cooks familiar with Cantonese would know that "dau see" ( :raz: ) is black fermented soya beans.

Brown beans = mean see, or mean see jern (paste), man see duen in Toisanese. :biggrin:

Tepee...I say bak dow with a "b"... :rolleyes::raz::laugh:

With all the tragic news around the world, we need beans to make us laugh a little!


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A thousand apologies, hz, while I crush your small note like a tau see. Msian/Sporeans tend to spell it with a 'T' rather than a 'D'. After all, the sound is a cross between the 2. When we spell it with a 'T', we don't say the word through our teeth like an actual 'T' sound, but rather with the tongue behind the top teeth. Blunt sound. A 'D' sound would be placing the tongue too far back.

.....

Hmmm.... Tepee... I need to suggest you to live in Hong Kong/Guangzhou/Shenzhen for a few years to retrain your Cantonese pronounciations... the official, proper way. No, no, approximation doesn't count. :laugh::laugh::laugh: I would imagine that the spoken "Cantonese" in Malaysia or Singapore have transformed somewhat over the centuries.

I can see that being a master of 5 Chinese dialects, it's easy to get confused. The orthodox Cantonese pronounciation for beans is a D.

And for "white", it's a B. Not a cross of B-P. Pure B.

I may be a banana in thinking... but my linguistic training is based on official Cantonese. :smile:


Edited by hzrt8w (log)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No fair! Two against One!

Methinks all of us need a nice trip to Tong San not only for language refresher classes but to satisfy other more innate needs.

BTW, hz, whom do you practise your 25-years-ago Cantonese with? Your toisanese other? 25 years is a long time.... :wink:


Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving the discussion from linguistics back to food... I use it in dishes like old fashioned beef and turnip, as a thickener for the stewed sauce.

Is this bean paste we're talking about essentially the same as the Amoy-brand sauce labelled 'Chu Hou'? The first ingedient in that is fermented soybeans.


Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is this bean paste we're talking about essentially the same as the Amoy-brand sauce labelled 'Chu Hou'?  The first ingedient in that is fermented soybeans.

Chu Hou sauce is different from brown bean paste. I think that Chu Hou has other ingridients blend in besides fermented soybeans. You will find Chu Hou used in Cantonese BBQ and beef stew often.


W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The linguistics tangent was an enjoyable, interesting, and educational read. That's what I love about this particular forum. We're all here for the same fundamental reasons but contribute based on our own life perceptions and experiences.

Perhaps a better question to ask would be:

What are the most common uses for Brown or Yellow Bean Paste?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Min see (bean sauce) is not chu hou sauce, Chu hou sauce is more akin to hoi sin sauce, not as sweet though.

Min see deng is one of those indispensible staples in th Chinese larder that is never missed until you need it. For me, it is an essential component in the marinades for Chinese styl bbq meats. Min see with steamed fish is a great rice accompaniment. Green beans chowed with pork, min see, a dash of sugar and a bit of 5-spice is to die for. I also use it in twice-cooked pork.

Be adventurous.

BTW: the real Toysanese among us with pronounce "white" with a "w" ie: "waak" similar to the "waak" as in "waak wah" or draw picture. :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We use both Yeo's and the Thai version, which I think tastes more flowery. We stir-fry ong choy (except we call it kang kung, the Malay word) with it, chillies, garlic and fish sauce, make bah kut teh, mix it with black beans and put it on shrimp to be steamed, use it when we make char siu, etc. etc. Like Ben says, it's a pantry staple.

regards,

trillium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The linguistics tangent was an enjoyable, interesting, and educational read. That's what I love about this particular forum. We're all here for the same fundamental reasons but contribute based on our own life perceptions and experiences.

Perhaps a better question to ask would be:

What are the most common uses for Brown or Yellow Bean Paste?

http://www.wingyipstore.co.uk/product-229807.html

Scroll down for recipes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be a banana in thinking... but my linguistic training is based on official Cantonese. 

Unfortunately, there's no "official" Cantonese, and many Cantonese speakers themselves don't even consider it to be "real" Chinese. Whenever a non-Chinese person says they want to learn Cantonese, even a Cantonese person will invariably tell them to learn Mandarin instead. In the past I've searched for study materials to help improve my Cantonese but good ones are almost nonexistent.

Cantonese as it is spoken in Guangzhou is not the same as what's spoken in HK. Which one do you consider more "official?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess what the labels of Koon Chun's Hoisin, Chee Hou, and Chap Kam all have in common? All the ingredients are exactly the same and in the same order: Sugar / vinegar / soya bean / water / salt / wheat flour / garlic / sesame seed / chili / spices / and artifical color fd & c red # 40. Koon Chun's "Flavoring Sauce" has the same label ingredients.

Yet they all taste a little different from each other. I guess it is different amounts of one of the flavorings?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow I just used kikkoman's black bean sauce with garlic in place of brown bean paste (i can't get that anywhere nearby) - ignorance isn't always bliss

it was wayyy too sweet but I cut it with natural peanut butter, tastes ok now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow I just used kikkoman's black bean sauce with garlic in place of brown bean paste (i can't get that anywhere nearby) - ignorance isn't always bliss

it was wayyy too sweet but I cut it with natural peanut butter (and threw in some classic stir fry sauce from house of tsang :huh: )

it was great on noodles - put some shredded cabbage on top for crunch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      I was recently asked by a friend to give a talk to a group of around 30 first-year students in a local college - all girls. The students were allowed to present me with a range of topics to choose from. To my joy, No. 1 was food! They wanted to know what is different between western and Chinese food. Big topic!
       
      Anyway I did my best to explain, illustrate etc. I even gave each student a home made Scotch egg! Which amused them immensely.

      Later, my friend asked each of them to write out (in English) a recipe for their favourite Chinese dish. She has passed these on to me with permission to use them as I wish. I will post a few of the better / more interesting ones over the next few days.

      I have not edited their language, so please be tolerant and remember that for many of these students, English is their third or fourth language. Chinese isn't even their first!

      I have obscured some personal details.

      First up:

      Tomato, egg noodles.

      Time: 10 minutes
       
      Yield: 1 serving

      For the noodle:

      1 tomato
      2 egg
      5 spring onions

      For the sauce:
       
      1 teaspoon sesame oil
      1 tablespoon sugar
      ½ teaspoon salt

      Method:

      1. The pot boil water. At that same time you can do something else.

      2. Diced tomato. Egg into the bowl. add salt and sugar mixed. Onion cut section.

      3. Boiled noodles with water and cook for about 5 minutes.

      4. Heat wok put oil, add eggs, stir fry until cooked. Another pot, garlic stir fry the tomato.

      5. add some water to boil, add salt, soy sauce, add egg
       
      6. The tomato and egg sauce over noodle, spring onion sprinkled even better.
       


      More soon.
    • By zend
      I just bought these greens from the neighborhood Asian grocery. Had them once in China as a salad, and they tasted exceptional - a bit peppery like arugula, yet much more subtle and fresh, with hints of lemon.
      Store lady (non-Chinese) could not name them for me other than "Chinese greens".
      Any help identifying them is greatly appreciated
       

    • By liuzhou
      China's plan to cut meat consumption by 50%
       
      I wish them well, but can't see it happening. Meat eating is very much seen as a status symbol and, although most Chinese still follow a largely vegetable diet out of economic necessity, meat is still highly desirable among the new middle classes. The chances of them willingly giving it up, even by 50%, seems remote to me.
    • By JohnT
      I have been asked to make Chinese Bow Tie desserts for a function. However, I have never made them, but using Mr Google, there are a number of different recipes out there. Does anybody have a decent recipe which is tried and tested? - these are for deep-fried pastry which are then soaked in sugar syrup.
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.