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French food web sites


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Actually, leave out ALL the vegetables that are mentioned in that recipe, just cook it with liver, soy sauce, etc., and you end up with something very similar to something that a friend of mine from Shanghai cooks.

But the French sites are indeed better.

It was the beansprouts that put it over the top for me. I don't think they've caught on yet to the fact that you can't just dump a random assortment of vaguely asian-looking veg and a hunk of meat in a pan, pour some soy sauce over it and call it Chinese. God knows I love my Germans, but they make midwestern Chinese restaurants look good, which is impressive considering we gave the world crab rangoon.

Anyway, enough hijacking of the thread, sorry!

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www.austenspooner.blogspot.com

www.foodhack.blogspot.com

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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MIAM is of course excellent and you get free French lessons as well. I'm planning on translating my friend chef Sergio's recipes into English for the site. He has some wonderful photo turtorials taken at his restaurant.

blog appétit a peak into what French bloggers are making at home.

You will see a diverse array of dishes. If the French have an aversion to something I don't see it in home cooking or in our own forums.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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  • 4 weeks later...

Merci, Ptipois!

Je viens de m'enregistrer sur MIAM -- c'est bien fait. Alors, il faut pratiquer le francais, comme il fait presqu'un an depuis que je le parle. Donc, je suis un peu rusty. :wink:

Mais c'est embetant qu'on ne peu pas mettre les accents sur le web. Grr...

Amities,

Jennifer

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

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Mais c'est embetant qu'on ne peu pas mettre les accents sur le web.  Grr... 

Mais si! Il faut frapper 'Alt' + un nombre comme ça:

é = Alt + 130

è = Alt + 138

ç = Alt + 135

à = Alt + 133

ô = Alt + 147

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Mais c'est embetant qu'on ne peu pas mettre les accents sur le web.  Grr... 

Mais si! Il faut frapper 'Alt' + un nombre comme ça:

é = Alt + 130

è = Alt + 138

ç = Alt + 135

à = Alt + 133

ô = Alt + 147

Actually, I just set my language to French French. But on eGullet we're not supposed to use accents because of the problem with searchability.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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Mais c'est embetant qu'on ne peu pas mettre les accents sur le web.  Grr... 

Mais si! Il faut frapper 'Alt' + un nombre comme ça:

é = Alt + 130

è = Alt + 138

ç = Alt + 135

à = Alt + 133

ô = Alt + 147

Well now that just makes me all kinds of happy. Merci infiniment, John! Now if I could just click "Alt" to check my grammar. ;)

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

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Mais c'est embetant qu'on ne peu pas mettre les accents sur le web.  Grr... 

Mais si! Il faut frapper 'Alt' + un nombre comme ça:

é = Alt + 130

è = Alt + 138

ç = Alt + 135

à = Alt + 133

ô = Alt + 147

Well now that just makes me all kinds of happy. Merci infiniment, John! Now if I could just click "Alt" to check my grammar. ;)

Now this is just :cool: Who knew? é, è, ç, à, ô, û, ù,Ä, â, ä, à, á,

Is there a guide for these? Anyone know how to do an enye?

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Now this is just :cool: Who knew? é, è, ç, à, ô, û, ù,Ä, â, ä, à, á,

Is there a guide for these? Anyone know how to do an enye?

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

You can select the English International keyboard in Windows 2k or XP (probably earlier versions, too) and type all the accents you want relatively easily. You can get instructions and a layout you can print out at Int'l Keyboard. The printout isn't great. Somewhere on MS's website they have all the keyboards available with Windows in usable color displays. I have a printout right below my screen. Unfortunately, I can't find the MS web page where I got it.

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I can manage the e's and a's with few problems, as well as the sedillas, but it's the little chapons that don't wish to cooperate. :smile:

However, I've now gotten lots of helpful hints from others here, so thank you! I feel like such a Neanderthal writing in French without the accents.

Edited for egregious spelling error.

Jennifer<--- normuly a gud speler

:cool:

Edited by Jennifer Iannolo (log)

Jennifer L. Iannolo

Founder, Editor-in-Chief

The Gilded Fork

Food Philosophy. Sensuality. Sass.

Home of the Culinary Podcast Network

Never trust a woman who doesn't like to eat. She is probably lousy in bed. (attributed to Federico Fellini)

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