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Burnt foods of the World


shelora
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Nickarte,

I've confessed NEARLY everything in my life, but never ever ever, before this, did i confess to loving burnt popcorn! And ain't it grand that there are others out there too! I love you all!

x marlena

ps sometimes i slice a couple cloves of garlic into the pan with the popcorn. i kinda like burnt garlic too.......

and have you ever made popcorn using a wok? its easy to get a real lot of burnt stuff, cause the surface of the wok is so big in comparison with the volume.

Edited by marlena spieler (log)

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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Open faced toasted cheese, done in the toaster oven....take about 5 slices of cheap american cheese and lay on a slice of bread, place in toaster oven and watch till the cheese puffs up and turns almost black. Then you peel the blackened cheese off put it on your plate and repeat 1 or 2 more times then you can fold your sandwich together with whatever cheese is left. Little bite of sandwich ...little bite of burned cheese alternating :cool:

yummies

tracey

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

My Webpage

garden state motorcyle association

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The line of charcoal in the middel of a Morbier cheese

Tradtionally chimney soot, dividing the morning from the evening milk

And California's riff courtesy of Cypress Grove...

Humboldt Fog

(Goat’s milk, Cypress Grove Chèvre, California)

The grayish-blue streak running through the white, chalky center of Humboldt Fog is often mistaken for blue mold, but it's actually flavorless vegetable ash, which also lightly covers the soft, exterior rind. Mildly goaty and tangy, often fluffy in the middle with a runny texture and stronger flavor around the rind as it ages. Humboldt Fog is Cypress Grove's signature cheese and must be tried by anyone interested in domestic, artisanal cheese.

click

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I love burnt popcorn too!, always let it go way beyond done. In fact as a kid my favorite was burnt Jiffy Pop (wonder if that still exists).

of course it does! we used to make it over the campfire.

The pan is black now... looks like plastic... I'm assuming it doesn't melt.

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Ohhh burnt popcorn. Remind me to never have movie night with any of you. As it is now, I can burn as much as I want and no one else will it it. It's mine, all mine!

I really like burnt sausages and hot dogs. If it has a casing on it... burn it. Bacon too. Burnt bacon is pure bliss.

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Not QUITE burnt black, but the little crunchles which slough off while you're frying chicken and remain in the skillet through one or two more fryings are deeply, brownly, richly tasty. Hubby always requests that I fry a pan or two of chicken wings while he is cutting corn; I pour the oil into another container, and he "fries" the cut kernels and scraped corn milk in the last bit of oil in that hot black skillet, with all those wonderful crunchy bits, even a bit of well-browned flour which escaped and sifted down. It's heavenly corn, and we had a bowl for dinner tonight.

And a childhood friend always toasted her marshmallows twice: she caught it on fire, let it blaze blue for a moment, ate that crust; then she stuck the stick with the naked, gooey middle back over the fire for another mini-inferno before she ate it.

But I just saw my beloved Miss Ina put her chicken to marinate in a tomato-based sauce BEFORE putting it on the grill. Tomato BEFORE=BAAAAAD burnt, not tasty.

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Charring peppers over an open flame would count as burnt too, wouldn't it? Or does removing the peel from the vegetable disqualify it from this category?

If it is included, then there is also the vast range of eggplant dishes as well where you char the skin, peel it off, and then mash the flesh and use as desired, whether as the Indian baingan ka bharta, or in countless other dishes.

Oh, now I have to go and buy eggplant and lay it on the stove...

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Cornflakes:

Will Keith Kellogg was the founder of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, founded in 1906. In 1894, Kellogg was trying to improve the vegetarian diet of hospital patients. He was searching for a digestible bread substitute using the process of boiling wheat. Kellogg accidentally left a pot of boiled wheat to stand and the wheat became tempered (soften). When Kellogg rolled the tempered or softened wheat and let it dry, each grain of wheat emerged as a large thin flake. The flakes turned out to be a tasty cereal. Kellogg had invented corn flakes.

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