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Char Kway Teow


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In North Sumatra it is known as 'mie tiau goreng' (where mie is noodle and goreng is fried).....

Never cockles or anything weird like that.....

That's why what you described is known as "mie tiau goreng" and not "char kway teow" which is the topic of this thread .... :hmmm:

Edited by SG- (log)
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In North Sumatra it is known as 'mie tiau goreng' (where mie is noodle and goreng is fried).....

Never cockles or anything weird like that.....

That's why what you described is known as "mie tiau goreng" and not "char kway teow" which is the topic of this thread .... :hmmm:

It's the same dish.....

It's like the guy who says he went to French restaurant and didn't eat frogs, he ate grenouilles.

"mie tiau goreng" means fried flat noodles, and so does char kway teow.

Same meaning, same dish, different executions in different places. :hmmm:

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It's the same dish.....

It's like the guy who says he went to French restaurant and didn't eat frogs, he ate grenouilles.

"mie tiau goreng" means fried flat noodles, and so does char kway teow.

Same meaning, same dish, different executions in different places.  :hmmm:

I think there's some confusion here. The literal meaning of CKT is indeed fried rice noodles.

But in Malaysia and Singapore at least, CKT has a more precise definition. It specifies a set of ingredients and a method of preparation that are unique and instantly recognized. The room for variation is limited. If the recipe is altered beyond a certain point, it can no longer claim to be CKT.

Would you make the argument that mie tiao goreng is the same dish as pad thai?

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It's the same dish.....

It's like the guy who says he went to French restaurant and didn't eat frogs, he ate grenouilles.

"mie tiau goreng" means fried flat noodles, and so does char kway teow.

Same meaning, same dish, different executions in different places.  :hmmm:

I think there's some confusion here. The literal meaning of CKT is indeed fried rice noodles.

But in Malaysia and Singapore at least, CKT has a more precise definition. It specifies a set of ingredients and a method of preparation that are unique and instantly recognized. The room for variation is limited. If the recipe is altered beyond a certain point, it can no longer claim to be CKT.

Would you make the argument that mie tiao goreng is the same dish as pad thai?

They are very similar in flavour. Pad thai really doesn't taste anything like either of them. I think it's the same dish

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It's the same dish.....

It's like the guy who says he went to French restaurant and didn't eat frogs, he ate grenouilles.

"mie tiau goreng" means fried flat noodles, and so does char kway teow.

Same meaning, same dish, different executions in different places.  :hmmm:

I think there's some confusion here. The literal meaning of CKT is indeed fried rice noodles.

But in Malaysia and Singapore at least, CKT has a more precise definition. It specifies a set of ingredients and a method of preparation that are unique and instantly recognized. The room for variation is limited. If the recipe is altered beyond a certain point, it can no longer claim to be CKT.

Would you make the argument that mie tiao goreng is the same dish as pad thai?

They are very similar in flavour. Pad thai really doesn't taste anything like either of them. I think it's the same dish

I will argue your mie tiao goreng based on what you described does not taste anything like "char kway teow". Ginger, Sweet Soy Sauce, Kerupuk, Cucumber, Chicken, Shallots!!??? Try passing of a dish like this in Singapore and Malaysia as "char kway teow" and see what kind of reponse you get.

You obviously don't appreciate nor even understand that even among Penang, Malacca, and Singapore style char kway teow which is 90% identical that there is often very heated arguments on which is the true or better version of char kway teow.

To further emphasize my point. Try making the following argument:

- Ayam bandung, KFC, Ayam goreng suharti, Southern Fried Chicken - All basically Fried Chicken Same Dish.

- Texas, North Carolina, Memphis BBQ - Same thing, just BBQ ribs.

- Pasta Bolognese, Carbonara, Alfredo. Fettuccini, Spaghetti, Penne, Fusili - Same thing, they're all just pasta.

- Mee Goreng Indonesia, Mee Goreng Mamak, Chow Mien, Bakmi Goreng - Same thing, just fried noodles.

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