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LONG and LOW cooking of pork butt


Bella S.F.
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I have been trying to remember a "recipe" idea I got from here a while back. It was based on a recipe from a female chef. That narrows it down, doesn't it"?!!Anyway, basically, you took a pork butt, put it in a 225 or was it 250 degree oven and cooked it for 17+ hours. I cannot remember if a rub was used, actually, I have had a brain fade and cannot remember anything else, except that it was succulent and tender. I do remember putting it in the oven at night and waking up to a smell that was just amazing. I would like to take a look at the original "recipe" again. Thanks for any help anyone can give me.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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The method you mention sounds to me like a Nigella Lawson method, which I have used. I put the pork shoulder in the oven for 24 hours (give or take, flexibly) at less than 200. I am not sure what temperature or time Nigella specifies, but I think there has been some discussion about it on egullet.

Unfortunately, I don't know how to post the links.

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i always cook pork butt. seems like if i was not bbq'ing it, i would just rub it down with brown sugar, white sugar, salt, pepper, paprika, garlic powder, and some cayenne. put the butt in the oven with a thermometer in it, and pull it out when it hits 200-205. make sure you put a pan of water underneath to catch the drippings.

The method you mention sounds to me like a Nigella Lawson method, which I have used.  I put the pork shoulder in the oven for 24 hours (give or take, flexibly) at less than 200. I am not sure what temperature or time Nigella specifies, but I think there has been some discussion about it on egullet.

Unfortunately, I don't know how to post the links.

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There is a lot of information on cooking

pork butts and pork shoulder on

eG with a lot of links to good information

elsewhere.

<br><br>

One start can be

<br>

<br>

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=28704&hl=

<br>

<br>

and that thread has a link to the relevant thread

<br>

<br>

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...12&hl=butt&st=0

<br>

<br>

with links to discussions of BBQ elsewhere.

<br><br>

TImes, temperatures, chemical reactions,

references to H. McGee,

etc. are all included.

<br><br>

There is some related material from Cook's Illustrated at

<br>

<br>

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/article.as...id=792&bdc=9504

<br>

<br>

It is also possible to braise chunks of pork shoulder;

from M. Batali can see:

<br>

<br>

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/cooking/re...6_19165,00.html

<br>

<br>

For a short answer, take a whole piece of pork butt or

pork picnic shoulder, place in oven at 225 F, and cook

to internal temperature 185-205 F.

<br><br>

Slowly cooked pork with a lot of emphasis on

vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper, garlic, and browning -- tough

to go wrong.<br>

:smile:

What would be the right food and wine to go with

R. Strauss's 'Ein Heldenleben'?

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You may be referring to Paula Wolfert's "Night-And-Day Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder" from her book "The Slow Mediterranean Kitchen". Outstanding dish.

Pre-heat the oven to 450F the reduce to 180F and cook overnight.

If this rings a bell, let me know and I'll see if I can find the recipe and post it.

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Thanks everyone for your ideas. Nigella Lawson rings a bell. I have not had a chance to read through everything yet, but will do so shortly.

dls, when you have a chance, I'd love to see the Paula Wolfert recipe. We are always looking for different things to try with a pork butt. I just have to make sure that I start writing things down. I am starting to realize that I am not too successful with remembering everything I am sure that I will remember. :smile:

One thing that we tried and found successful... we put a dry rub on overnight, smoked it for about 3 hours, and then brought it in and finished it off in a low oven till pull "apart with spaghetti grabber tender". It was nice to not have to tend the fire for that many hours, plus "they" say that after the first few hours, the smoke has done all it is going to do.

I am going to start reading. Thanks, Project, for the links.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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Bella....

Paula Wolfert's recipe follows:

Night-And-Day Slow-Roasted Pork Shoulder

1 bone-in, skin-on fresh pork picnic shoulder roast Boston butt (6 to 7 lb.)

1 head garlic

1 tablespoon coarse salt

1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano or marjoram

1 teaspoon dried thyme

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 large onion, thinly sliced

1 carrot, sliced

1/2 cup oloroso sherry

4 cups chicken stock

Crushed hot red pepper

1 1/2 teaspoons sherry vinegar or balsamic vinegar

1. Preheat oven to 450F. Score skin in a crisscross diamond pattern like a ham, making deep cuts about 1 inch apart. Separate and peel garlic cloves. In a mortar and pestle, crush garlic, salt, oregano, thyme, and pepper into a coarse paste (or mince garlic, then mix with salt, herbs, and pepper). Rub garlic paste all over roast.

2. Set roast, skin side up, on a rack in an oiled shallow roasting pan. Roast until deep golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes.

3. Scatter onion and carrot slices around pork. Pour 1/2 the sherry and 1/2 the stock into pan. Add chile.. Baste pork with some of the pan juices. Reduce oven temperature to 180F and bake until a thermometer inserted through the center of thickest part at bone reads 170F to 175F, about 12 hours. If pork is done before you're ready to serve, reduce oven temperature to 160F and hold in oven up to 4 hours.

4. About 30 minutes before serving, transfer pork to a carving board. Cover loosely and set in a warm place. Pour remaining sherry and stock into the pan. Bring to a boil, scraping up browned bits from bottom of pan. Boil, stirring occasionally, until liquid is reduced to about 1 cup. Strain the pan juices into a bowl, pressing on vegetables (discard vegetables). Skim off and discard fat. Stir in vinegar and correct the seasoning.

5. Lift skin off pork and cut it into thick strips; place on a serving platter. Slice meat across the grain and arrange on platter. Pour pan juices over meat.

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dls, thank you! That sounds amazing! Only caveat... I have never seen a pork butt with the skin on here on the west coast. I always use a reguler pork butt and leave on some of the coating of fat.

Oloroso sherry is a new one for me. I need to look it up. Is that what you use or have you substituted another type of sherry?

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

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dls, thank you! That sounds amazing! Only caveat... I have never seen a pork butt with the skin on here on the west coast. I always use a reguler pork butt and leave on some of the coating of fat.

  Oloroso sherry is a new one for me. I need to look it up. Is that what you use or have you substituted another type of sherry?

Bella - The only way I can get a skin on shoulder is to pre-order from my butcher. I've done it both ways (skin on or off) and it's not a big issue with the final result. The crispy skin is just an added bonus.

Oloroso is a dry, full-bodied sherry that I'm not sure there is a substitute for. Someone else more expert in sherries may be able to provide a better answer. In any event, you should be able to find it at any decent wine shop.

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There is a lot of information on cooking

pork butts and pork shoulder on

eG with a lot of links to good information

elsewhere.

<br><br>

One start can be

<br>

<br>

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=28704&hl=

<br>

<br>

and that thread has a link to the relevant thread

<br>

<br>

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...12&hl=butt&st=0

<br>

<br>

with links to discussions of BBQ elsewhere.

<br><br>

TImes, temperatures, chemical reactions,

references to H. McGee,

etc. are all included.

<br><br>

There is some related material from Cook's Illustrated at

<br>

<br>

http://www.cooksillustrated.com/article.as...id=792&bdc=9504

<br>

<br>

It is also possible to braise chunks of pork shoulder;

from M. Batali can see:

<br>

<br>

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/cooking/re...6_19165,00.html

<br>

<br>

For a short answer, take a whole piece of pork butt or

pork picnic shoulder, place in oven at 225 F, and cook

to internal temperature 185-205 F.

<br><br>

Slowly cooked pork with a lot of emphasis on

vinegar, sugar, salt, pepper, garlic, and browning -- tough

to go wrong.<br>

:smile:

Another EGullet butt thread including many butt pictures, some of them cold and naked

Behold my butt

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Weber has a pretty complete treatment of pork butts. Naturally, it revolves around using the Weber Smoky Mountain (Weber Bullet) charcoal smoker but the information isn't restricted to using their smoker. There is a lot of useful information on selection and preparation.

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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