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Chris Amirault

Hot Dog Styles

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I chicken-fried a hot dog today (no cream gravy, just had it on a bun with habanero-cilantro relish and Heinz 57), and I was kind of doing it as a joke, but I gotta tell you, I'll be doing that again.

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Yep -- Boar's Head natural casing hot dog; flour, then buttermilk/egg, then cornmeal/flour/seasoned salt. I wasn't super-careful about getting a thick coating on it because last time I made CFS with this cornmeal, it was too thick and some of it didn't cook fully in the nooks and crannies. So there were a couple of exposed spots where I picked the hot dog up to put it in the pan.

Pan-fried it until it split open, flipping once. I had been afraid the coating wouldn't adhere, or that it would be too greasy, but it really didn't taste noticeably greasy (relative to any other hot dog), and it was super-crispy/crunchy without the coating breaking off when you bite into it, which I hope wasn't one of those lucky things that only worked out the first time and will fail me next time.

I'm sure it would have been fine with cream gravy but I forgot to buy milk yesterday, and the ordinary hot dog condiments didn't seem out of place at all.

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After last week's dogs, I don't think I'm gonna be doing any at least for the remainder of the week.

I have to weigh in in favor of the Chicago dog, too. It really can't be beat for a day-to-day dog.

Of late, though, I've been sampling what only the truly dedicated hot dog eater could swallow: the gas station chili cheese dog. Imagine an Oscar Mayer weiner (that is what I'd truly like to beeeee) with mustard, onions, this sort of chili-like substance that is dispensed from a contraption that keeps the bags (yes, I said "bags") of chili and "cheese" sauce liquid enough to flow. At 2 for $2, they're worht every penny you pay for them and not one cent more. And yet, like crack, I can't stay away.

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Since the responses on the hamburger toppings thread have been so interesting and varied, I thought it was time to pay some attention to the other summertime favorite cookout food, the hot dog.

So.....Fellow Foodies and E-Gulletiers, what's on YOUR dog?

Mine; first choice mustard, chopped onions & sweet pickle relish.

2nd place, chili, sharp cheddar & chopped onions.

3rd place, 'kraut, mustard & chopped onions.


--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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For a quality kosher or kosher style beef hot dog, just brown deli mustard. For a milder spiced beef and pork dog, mustard and chili, or the unique, delicious relish at Rutts Hut.


John the hot dog guy

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Always, always, always mustard. Sauerkraut or other pickles are optional. Ketchup is an abomination. Cheese can be fun. I used to have chopped onion, but started getting an upset tummy after eating raw onion. (It's been a while, though... maybe I should try again.)


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Hmm at home - pickles, cheese and potato chips

At Amazing Hot Dog - chili, jalepenos, and coleslaw

anywhere else - chili, cheese and raw onions

Except for the Italian hot dog that only NJ is blessed with - which is a deep fried hotdog dropped into a roll with the texture of a medium soft Italian bread and dressed with suateed peppers, and onions, and fried potatoes usually also mustard

At home we use Bests or Sabrett - When out you just take your chances that you may get a mushy pork or mixed meat dog

tracey

whos hungry now?


Edited by rooftop1000 (log)

The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

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Nathan's or Hebrew National with mustard, onion, and sweet relish. The only way to go.

I will have Miller's dogs from the stand in the plaza occasionally but still dressed the same.

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Chili, mustard, chopped onions and either chopped dill pickles or jalapenos.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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A nice spicy mustard. I like the flavor of the dog to come shining through. :laugh:


Iris

GROWWWWWLLLLL!!

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A slightly gourmet-ified version of the classic Chicago hot dog:

dijon (instead of yellow), homemade sweet relish (instead of the bright green stuff--and if you're not familiar with a classic Chicago hot dog, the relish is seriously day-glo green), homemade dill pickle spear nestled next to the dog (rather than a spear from a jar), minced onions (preferable new from my garden), tiny pickled peppers (again homemade--usually Thai Dragons--instead of the sport peppers), with a dash of celery salt on top. I forsake the tomatoes because I am allergic. All in a poppyseed bun, of course! (Haven't gotten around to making homemade buns, though). Just about to embark upon making home made dogs (apparently a pretty difficult sausage to make).

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Ahhh... even though I was a longtime Chicago resident, I never supported the Chicago dog. As the emperor in Amadeus said to Mozart: "too many notes."

Pure: yellow mustard, chopped onions (preferably from the little onion grinder at Wrigley Field, to be eaten with one hand while watching the Cubs with a beer in the other hand)

Pimped: with chili, onions & velveeta.

A homemade dog, however, is definitely something I would be interested in hearing more about.


...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

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Hot dogs. A subject near and dear to my heart. :wub:

My favorite dog is Hebrew Nationals all beef with the natural casing. On a soft bun, dressed with a thin stripe of yellow mustard, is Heaven itself.

Oddly enough, a close runner up is the roller dogs from Quik Trip. .99 cents each, two please.

With that out of the way, I like many kinds of hot dogs/sausages. Brats, Smokies, etc, it's all good to me.

Oh yeah. Anyone attempting to put ketchup on my dogs will be made to cry.


Edited by Norm357 (log)

Chicks dig wheelguns.

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Brats..........mmmmmmmmmmmmm. Just as they are, please. And the next day, pan fried with eggs. Yummy!


Brenda

I whistfully mentioned how I missed sushi. Truly horrified, she told me "you city folk eat the strangest things!", and offered me a freshly fried chitterling!

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All-beef, on a toasty bun, with Sriracha, yellow mustard, minced onion and minced green chili peppers. Really pretty color combo, spicy delicious, and your breath can put people off for hours unless you brush your teeth! :biggrin:

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I prefer a Nathan's skinless dog w/kraut, pickle relish and brown mustard. If not grilling, I will do them on a cast iron skillet, rolling them continuously.

Recently, in a hedonistic mood, I covered some pan grilled dogs in buns w/bechamel and Gruyere and put them under the broiler. Not sure what to call it (Croque Chien?), but it sure was tasty (knife and fork definitely required).


"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."

~ Fernand Point

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Hmmmm... what I like on hot dogs

Chili (no beans) with cheddar

shredded cheddar, dill pickle slices, mustard (Caspers got me started on that)

mustard only

mustard with dill relish

NO ketchup, no turkey dogs. I prefer beef or beef/pork/chicken mix weiners.


Cheryl

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All-beef, on a toasty bun, with Sriracha, yellow mustard, minced onion and minced green chili peppers. Really pretty color combo, spicy delicious, and your breath can put people off for hours unless you brush your teeth!  :biggrin:

I thought I was the only nut that put sriracha on dogs! For me, my standard pure home dog is a light painting of dijon, and a thin line of sriracha. The other day, I tried just sriracha and relish and found it to be fantastic, sweet, tart, and hot.

From Heidelberg, this great hot dog and beer place on the local boardwalk, I like it plain with their hot pepper relish, or with chili, onions and the pepper relish. The relish fights with the fake cheese, so when dining there, I leave it off. Another favorite is a bit of sauerkraut, and the pepper relish.

At home chili dogs are another story...these are an event unto themselves. Chili, processed cheese, pickled japepeno slices, diced onion, hot sauce, and sour cream.

My bun of preferance, when making dogs at home is a sweet, soft yellow potato roll.

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My ultimate hot dog, never to be repeated, would be one of the hot dogs that I sold in my restaurant in rural Manitoba.

Handmade weiner, (read "country butcher", NOT "artisinal"), deep fried, (which I thought was weird, until I tried it.), on a bakery bun...soft and white. This was opened, lightly buttered, and put on the grill.

Fried onions went on, and a homemade sauce that was a lot like Thousand Island dressing. (Miracle Whip, pickle relish, enough Ketchup to make it a bit pink.)

These were hot dogs to swoon over, weird as they might sound. It was the weiners, of course, European style, utterly fresh, natural casings, beef and pork with no by-products. They were big without being ostentatious, they didn't try to outrank the bun. They nestled in, knowing their place.

I still dream of these, not to mention the burgers that we made.

Sherry

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All-beef. Lightly toasty/still soft, lightly buttered bun (a la for a lobster roll). Kimchi and pickles. This is all.


Edited by Bueno (log)

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