Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

eje

Making your own grenadine

Recommended Posts

I can get a nice grenadine at the local Middle Eastern market that's not too sweet and not loaded with HFCS. Has anyone tried a homemade grenadine against a product like this? Given how little is used in most drinks, is the homemade grenadine adding enough flavor to justify the hassle?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can get a nice grenadine at the local Middle Eastern market that's not too sweet and not loaded with HFCS. Has anyone tried a homemade grenadine against a product like this? Given how little is used in most drinks, is the homemade grenadine adding enough flavor to justify the hassle?

I haven't done the comparison in your first question. But with regards to the second question, for me, there is enough grenadine flavor in most drinks to justify the hassle of homemade.

... But there is very little hassle. I used Katie's half-hot half-cold method and it turned out great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here I was thinking, "wait a minute... that's my half hot/half cold grenadine method." And then I realized I had never posted my method to this thread. D'oh. Turns out more than one person can have a good idea. :smile:

Anyway, another variation on grenadine. From the applejack thread:

I use a supersaturated grenadine I made by doing a fourfold reduction of POM, melting in as much sugar as it would hold, allowing it to cool and then thinning it out with fresh POM.

I also sometimes add a touch of orange flower water and vanilla. I make large batches, and have found this technique and formula keeps for as long as a year. For the "storage" bottles, I'll float a bit of vodka over the surface (the grenadine is thick enough that the vodka will stay in a separate layer until shaken in).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also sometimes add a touch of orange flower water and vanilla. 

This, in my opinion, is how to make very good pomegranate syrup into extraordinary grenadine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've given the home made grenadine a go using the simmer seeds in water, strain and then make a simple syrup. Was good, much better than store bought.

I'm in Australia and have started looking about for Pomegranate juice. Has anyone tried either of the following products?

Pom Wonderful

Found Organic

Pomegranates are $5 each at the moment so the juice looks like a good option.

Damien


Edited by Didge (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I'm a cheapskate, but I still think it is weird to buy Pom and reduce it.

Pom is made from Pomegranate concentrate. Why pay them to sell you water?

Why not cut out the middle man and just buy pomegranate concentrate/paste?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Good point.  Where can one get some?

Well, I'd say Good Life Grocery or Rainbow Foods, but that doesn't help you much out on the East Coast.

Somewhere like Bell Bates in Tribeca seems like it would be a good bet. Or a Middle Eastern or Indian market?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe I'm a cheapskate, but I still think it is weird to buy Pom and reduce it.

Pom is made from Pomegranate concentrate.  Why pay them to sell you water?

Why not cut out the middle man and just buy pomegranate concentrate/paste?

I've never seen Pomegranate concentrate, although I have no doubt it exists. Whole Foods carries a Cranberry concentrate I've used in the past to bump up a homemade "cran-cello" and it was a godsend. Don't remember the brand name off the top of my head, but it was in with all the natural juices and there may have been a pomegranate version as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe I'm a cheapskate, but I still think it is weird to buy Pom and reduce it.

Pom is made from Pomegranate concentrate.  Why pay them to sell you water?

Why not cut out the middle man and just buy pomegranate concentrate/paste?

I've never seen Pomegranate concentrate, although I have no doubt it exists. Whole Foods carries a Cranberry concentrate I've used in the past to bump up a homemade "cran-cello" and it was a godsend. Don't remember the brand name off the top of my head, but it was in with all the natural juices and there may have been a pomegranate version as well.

Aren't pomegranate molasses simply pomegranate. I've got a bottle on my shelf (the brand is Anjar and it's made in Lebenon). It contains simply "pomegranate concentrated juice."

I need to actually make some grenadine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe I'm a cheapskate, but I still think it is weird to buy Pom and reduce it.

Pom is made from Pomegranate concentrate.  Why pay them to sell you water?

Why not cut out the middle man and just buy pomegranate concentrate/paste?

I've never seen Pomegranate concentrate, although I have no doubt it exists. Whole Foods carries a Cranberry concentrate I've used in the past to bump up a homemade "cran-cello" and it was a godsend. Don't remember the brand name off the top of my head, but it was in with all the natural juices and there may have been a pomegranate version as well.

Aren't pomegranate molasses simply pomegranate. I've got a bottle on my shelf (the brand is Anjar and it's made in Lebenon). It contains simply "pomegranate concentrated juice."

I need to actually make some grenadine.

Todd:

I think the Pomegranate molasses contains some added sugar or molasses already. Not positive but I don't think it's just pomegranate. If it's imported I think it's possible the label isn't subject to the same regulations and doesn't list everything?

My best homemade grenadine started with 100% pomegranate juice from the Russian grocery store. 16 oz. got boiled down to half volume and then 16 oz. sugar were added. Also added about 1/4 cup of pomegranate molasses for viscosity and mouthfeel and allowed it to melt in while still hot. Another 16 oz. was done via the "cold" method where I just shook the hell out of it until it was saturated with sugar. Approximately just a bit more than equal volume. I combined these two batches, added just a little bit of orange flower water (to my taste was about a half tablespoon, IIRC) and about 1.5 oz. of vodka (100 proof) to make it shelf stable. Voila! Homemade grenadine with both the richer flavor and viscosity of cooked and the fresh fruitiness of cold method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aren't pomegranate molasses simply pomegranate. I've got a bottle on my shelf (the brand is Anjar and it's made in Lebenon). It contains simply "pomegranate concentrated juice."

I need to actually make some grenadine.

It may vary by brand, but the most common brand in CA sells both a pomegranate concentrate and a pomegranate molasses.

The Molasses has caramel coloring and other extra ingredients that make it unappealing in a Grenadine. It also seems a bit more concentrated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Todd:

I think the Pomegranate molasses contains some added sugar or molasses already.  Not positive but I don't think it's just pomegranate.  If it's imported I think it's possible the label isn't subject to the same regulations and doesn't list everything?

My bottle is labeled "Pure pomegrannate molasse" (or "Mélasses de grenades pures" for you French speakers). Maybe it's a different product than those with sugar added.

My best homemade grenadine started with 100% pomegranate juice from the Russian grocery store.  16 oz. got boiled down to half volume and then 16 oz. sugar were added.  Also added about 1/4 cup of pomegranate molasses for viscosity and mouthfeel and allowed it to melt in while still hot.  Another 16 oz. was done via the "cold" method where I just shook the hell out of it until it was saturated with sugar.  Approximately just a bit more than equal volume.  I combined these two batches, added just a little bit of orange flower water (to my taste was about a half tablespoon, IIRC) and about 1.5 oz. of vodka (100 proof) to make it shelf stable.  Voila!  Homemade grenadine with both the richer flavor and viscosity of cooked and the fresh fruitiness of cold method.

Ok, that sounds easy. So when you reduce the juice by half it's still not as thick as the pomegranate molasses?

I'm still not clear on the cold method portion. What are you shaking? Undiluted pomegranate juice?

Someone above mentioned adding vanilla as well? How much?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ok, that sounds easy. So when you reduce the juice by half it's still not as thick as the pomegranate molasses?

Correct. Which is why I add just a bit of pom molasses as well.

I'm still not clear on the cold method portion. What are you shaking? Undiluted pomegranate juice?

I'm shaking 100 percent pomegranate juice and granulated sugar in a container large enough for it to help along the dissolving process. Cold processed pomegranate juice is stupid easy to make, but requires some endurance and a strong shoulder.

Someone above mentioned adding vanilla as well? How much?

Not sure as I've never done this. I really love the whisper of orange flower in the background. I might try this on a small portion of my next batch to see how I like it, but I think both might make it taste too much like a floral pomegranate creamsicle. I think either vanilla or orange flower. Both together would be a real flavor balancing act. The grenadine is supposed to basically function as a sweetening agent in the drinks, not bring too much to the party IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to disagree with you, Ms. Loeb; no reason grenadine can't be as complex as Orgeat or Falernum in it's own way. I do in fact like to add both OFW and vanilla extract, about 1/3 as much vanilla as ofw, so I put perhaps a jigger of orange flower water and a tablespoon of vanilla extract when I make very large batches of grenadine, somewhere between 3 and 4 quarts finished volume. It's pretty perfumey, but I think it balances nicely off of the fruityness of the pomegranate. In drinks it comes across pretty subtle. Here's what I've been making with it lately to fight the good fight against the 'Cherry Vodka Sour' fad:

Cherry Daisy

1.5 oz Beefeaters

.5 oz Grenadine

.5 oz Cherry Heering

.75 oz lemon

Shake briefly with ice and strain into OF glass with fresh ice, top with a short splash of soda. Not half bad and it gets people to try something new (sort of).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy:

Your point is valid and I'll happily bow to your experience having done this. I have plenty of grenadine at home right now, but will surely try out some vanilla in at least a portion of the next batch I make. I suppose there is no reason it can't be complex. I just wouldn't want those background flavors to be too much in the forefront. If balance is achieved, more power to you. It sounds delicious, as does that Cherry Daisy. I'll try one of those as soon as I'm able. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make a half-hot-half-cold process grenadine as well, and I throw a couple star anise pods in with the hot process during reduction. It's not for every drink, but it's a noticeable (and enjoyable) note in my Jack Roses. I'll have to try vanilla and/or orange flower water in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just made my first batch of grenadine, using eje's recipe with added orange flower water and vanilla as per the thirtyoneknot's recipe. I was on the fence about whether I should heat it or not, until I tasted my pomegranate concentrate (Carlo brand) and my pomegranate juice side by side.

I purchased Trader Joe's organic pomegranate juice (from concentrate), because it was the best I could find. Tasting it, it's a fine juice, with minimal cooked flavor - of course, fresh would be better, but pomegranate season is months away.

I also tasted the Carlo pomegranate concentrate alone, then watered down side by side with the Trader Joe's organic pomegranate juice. It's really a pretty excellent product, and if I had a refractometer handy to adjust the concentration perfectly, I think it would be as good as any bottled juice made from concentrate.

Given that the Carlo concentrate is cooked, and any juice from concentrate, or even pasteurized, will have a cooked flavor, I decided I wouldn't hurt it by cooking it to dissolve the sugar and hopefully invert a small portion of it due to the acid in the juice.

The flavor of the grenadine is delicious. Next time I will probably go with pomegranate concentrate and a small amount of water, instead of pomegranate concentrate and pomegranate juice, unless I can make it myself or buy it fresh squeezed. I'm currently waiting for my grenadine to cool down, so I can mix it into a cocktail. The only question is: What to make?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Jack Rose is a great cocktail. But it's also easy to make one that results in a sound "meh." Much discussion here. Without bonded applejack, it's pretty hit-or-miss in my opinion. One easy cocktail to hit with grenadine is a Monkey Gland.

On the general topic of grenadine, as stated above I like to do a reduced hot and cold grenadine in order to get the concentration, jammy cooked flavors and saturation of the reduced hot version along with the brighter, "fresh" flavors of the cold version. This time around, rather than reducing the pomegranate juice myself, I'm starting with organic pomegranate concentrate. I'll melt sugar into that at around 4:1, and then dilute that back out with an equal volume of fresh pomegranate juice (most likely in two stages: one "warm" and one "cold") to end up with grenadine at approximately 2:1 concentration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Jack Rose is a great cocktail.  But it's also easy to make one that results in a sound "meh."  Much discussion here.  Without bonded applejack, it's pretty hit-or-miss in my opinion.  One easy cocktail to hit with grenadine is a Monkey Gland.

On the general topic of grenadine, as stated above I like to do a reduced hot and cold grenadine in order to get the concentration, jammy cooked flavors and saturation of the reduced hot version along with the brighter, "fresh" flavors of the cold version.  This time around, rather than reducing the pomegranate juice myself, I'm starting with organic pomegranate concentrate.  I'll melt sugar into that at around 4:1, and then dilute that back out with an equal volume of fresh pomegranate juice (most likely in two stages: one "warm" and one "cold")  to end up with grenadine at approximately 2:1 concentration.

i never make grenadine from fresh pomegranites but i also don't like that stewed aroma that some brands have more than others. would it ever make sense to use fresh pomegranite juice and freeze concentrate it like a faux ice wine must?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i never make grenadine from fresh pomegranites but i also don't like that stewed aroma that some brands have more than others.  would it ever make sense to use fresh pomegranite juice and freeze concentrate it like a faux ice wine must?

Going by freeze concentration I've done on citrus fruit, I'll say that yes it'll give you the best possible flavor. On the other hand, you lose quite a lot of your pomegranate juice, and it takes forever, but if you really want the perfect taste of raw pomegranate juice, freeze concentration is your best bet.

That said, I doubt it would taste anything like most grenadine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh wow. I made a batch of grenadine last night using a 1:1.5 mix of POM and granulated sugar, shaken vigorously while I watched TV. I added a dash of vanilla and OFW for a little added flavor.

Then tasted...

...dear God this stuff is good. Totally different from the stuff off the shelf in the grocery store. Now the question is, how do I use it? I'm picturing maybe a champagne cocktail with pomegranate liquer (I have a bottle of the stuff that I haven't been able to figure out a use for)....or maybe the Jack Rose that someone mentioned downthread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×