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Camping, Princess Style


Marlene
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1 hour ago, heidih said:

Can't say I have ever had a good crispy hash well executed as you describe. I'd enjoy it. Maybe also with a poached egg to sauce it.  I always smile at the toast slice. Reminds me of grandpa who had to have the bread slice it even if other starches in meal. And not rustic artisan stuff. 

I don't have it in me to enjoy a fried egg without toast, whatever other starches might be present. Can't have one without the other, as the song says.

 

In my case it's usually in the form of "breakfast for dinner," since that's when fried eggs usually make sense for me.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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15 hours ago, heidih said:

Can't say I have ever had a good crispy hash well executed as you describe. I'd enjoy it. Maybe also with a poached egg to sauce it.  I always smile at the toast slice. Reminds me of grandpa who had to have the bread slice it even if other starches in meal. And not rustic artisan stuff. 

 

15 hours ago, Shelby said:

Me too.  Ronnie loves a good slice of bread with dinner....he's had to cut back for health reasons, but he still indulges once in a while.  

 

14 hours ago, chromedome said:

I don't have it in me to enjoy a fried egg without toast, whatever other starches might be present. Can't have one without the other, as the song says.

 

In my case it's usually in the form of "breakfast for dinner," since that's when fried eggs usually make sense for me.

 

It took me at least 15 years of marriage to start getting the obligatory toast into my long-term memory. My paternal grandfather was a "toast with dinner" person, but my father wasn't. I like bread with dinner if it's fresh and integral to the meal (garlic bread with pasta, or fresh warm bread to soak up a sauce) but otherwise just don't think about it. I can't tell you how many times I'd have dinner waiting, both of us sitting, and then realized I hadn't put bread in the toaster!

 

Last night it was our version of tuna noodle hot dish. It's funny: I've been deciding that I simply don't need as many shapes of pasta in this trailer as we've been carrying around, and had decided to eliminate some. Egg noodles was one of the shapes to go. He says that his Bedouin guide always and only used elbow macaroni, no matter the dish, including this one. Besides, I reasoned, we have a pasta maker. I could make fresh noodles if I wanted. Last week I said "nertz" to that idea and bought egg noodles again. Extra wide. Perfect for our hot dish. I'm glad I did. I'll eliminate some other shape instead.

 

Can you tell he was hungry?

 

20220124_200254.jpg

 

This morning's sunrise: more moisture in the air than yesterday.

 

20220125_075314.jpg

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15 minutes ago, Smithy said:

 

It took me at least 15 years of marriage to start getting the obligatory toast into my long-term memory. My paternal grandfather was a "toast with dinner" person, but my father wasn't. I like bread with dinner if it's fresh and integral to the meal (garlic bread with pasta, or fresh warm bread to soak up a sauce) but otherwise just don't think about it. I can't tell you how many times I'd have dinner waiting, both of us sitting, and then realized I hadn't put bread in the toaster!

 

I've gotten past the "it's not a meal without bread" aspect of my upbringing, and can't say that obligatory toast is something I've seen as a general rule. I just like it with my eggs (and my porridge, fwiw) as a textural contrast.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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2 minutes ago, chromedome said:

I've gotten past the "it's not a meal without bread" aspect of my upbringing, and can't say that obligatory toast is something I've seen as a general rule. I just like it with my eggs (and my porridge, fwiw) as a textural contrast.

 

I love it that you wrote "textural contrast". He simply says "crunch". 😄 You are a precise wordsmith, sir - a necessity in profesional writing.

 

(I did understand what you meant with regard to when you want toast. He's much more hard-core about it. The rare exception is with chili or soup, which requires crackers instead of bread to provide the textural contrast crunch.)

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I have to say that I always want bread/toast/rolls with breakfast and dinner, no matter how many other starches there are.  My meal feels incomplete otherwise.  I’ll never forget years ago, when I’d been participating in the Dinner thread for some time, someone (don’t remember who) asked me if I always had bread with dinner.  I had to confess that indeed I did😊.  I don’t care if I have meatballs on pasta, I still want some garlic toast.  And even if I’m serving scalloped potatoes or mashed with ham or fried chicken, I’m always going to want biscuits or cornbread.  With roast beef, I want Yorkie and roast potatoes.  I’ll stop now. 😁

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38 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I have to say that I always want bread/toast/rolls with breakfast and dinner, no matter how many other starches there are.  My meal feels incomplete otherwise.  I’ll never forget years ago, when I’d been participating in the Dinner thread for some time, someone (don’t remember who) asked me if I always had bread with dinner.  I had to confess that indeed I did😊.  I don’t care if I have meatballs on pasta, I still want some garlic toast.  And even if I’m serving scalloped potatoes or mashed with ham or fried chicken, I’m always going to want biscuits or cornbread.  With roast beef, I want Yorkie and roast potatoes.  I’ll stop now. 😁

 

Maybe you're my husband's long-lost sister!

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"Dicing the potatoes, not slicing them as he did all those years. In order to dice them, he slices them into rounds and uses an alligator chopper."

 

@Smithy  I had one of those once and it didn't work without a lot of pressure and even then I had to free up manually the bits and pieces that were stuck in the blades.  Needless to say, I no longer have it.  Can you tell me if yours cuts cleanly with not an excessive amount of pressure?  If yes, can you tell me which one you have?   Amazon carries a number of different ones.   I may be tempted to buy one.

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6 hours ago, ElsieD said:

"Dicing the potatoes, not slicing them as he did all those years. In order to dice them, he slices them into rounds and uses an alligator chopper."

 

@Smithy  I had one of those once and it didn't work without a lot of pressure and even then I had to free up manually the bits and pieces that were stuck in the blades.  Needless to say, I no longer have it.  Can you tell me if yours cuts cleanly with not an excessive amount of pressure?  If yes, can you tell me which one you have?   Amazon carries a number of different ones.   I may be tempted to buy one.

 

This is the one we have: Vidalia Onion Chopper (eG-friendly Amazon.com link). I'm not sure whether the brand matters so much as the technique; we broke the first one that my parents gave me after some time of abuse. It takes a fair amount of pressure to push the chopper lid down, and for me the best way to do it is to give the lid a sharp whack. However, it's imperative to hold the hinge end down firmly with one hand while smacking the open end with the other. If you don't keep pressure on the hinge end, then eventually the leverage of the stuff you're chopping will break a hinge. (If this doesn't make sense, ask and I'll post photos of what I mean.) It's also helpful to cut things into, say, 1-2 cm thickness before chopping so you aren't trying to push through too much at once. 

 

The thing we learned about cleaning is that onions leave debris that must be cleaned from the grid, but potatoes don't - and they'll clear most or all of the onion debris from the grid. If we only have to chop an onion, I'm likely to use a knife and he's likely to skip it - or else chop potatoes for the next batch of hash!

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Tonight was supposed to be his turn to cook: the last half of the pork shoulder roast I bought in December that's been taking up freezer space. (As a rule I'd try to reserve it for souvlaki, but we haven't much wanted to do campfire cooking yet, so I relented on its use. Besides, I'll be leaving him alone for a few days and he's feeling a bit of food insecurity. If you could see the refrigerator and freezer you'd know how preposterous that is, but he wants what he wants.) Then the weather was nice, and the roast wasn't thawing fast enough, and we spent a good deal of the afternoon playing music with a neighbor, so it came down to quick dinner instead.

 

I can now give a side-by-side comparison of the two kinds of frozen fish we have in the freezer: Van de Kamp's Beer Battered Fish filets, and Gorton's Crunchy Breaded Fish filets. Both fish are pollock, although I had to look harder at the Van de Kamp's package to figure that out.

 

20220125_203148.jpg

 

I'll admit that right off the bat I'm prejudiced: the shorter ingredient list is the reason I bought Gorton's in the first place. Still, he picked out the beer battered fish. He doesn't read ingredient lists (or corporate ownership labels), and marvels that I bother. 

 

One issue with a side-by-side test, when cooking them in the same pan, is that Gorton's was supposed to get a few minutes' less cooking. I didn't think to add them to the pan after giving the Van de Kamp's a head start. In the collage below, you can see the difference in color. On the left, the uncooked filets; on the right, finished. 

 

20220125_200712.jpg

 

The panko-coated (Gorton's) filets were easier to turn; I could use tongs with them. The Van de Kamp's were flaky and tender and prone to falling apart. They demanded a spatula.

 

This was a quick dinner to prepare. Once the oven was preheated, the filets cooked in 20 minutes. In the last 10 minutes, I cooked broccoli and cauliflower on stove top, with Berbera spice mix and butter and enough water to steam them until tender. 

 

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Dinner:

20220125_190224.jpg

 

You can clearly see the difference in the fish color; the difference in texture is more subtle. The panko-coated fish were firmer as well as darker. Would the fish have been more comparable, if the beer-battered fish had been cooked longer? It will be worth finding out.

 

In both cases the fish was flaky. This is the best pair of photos I could get.

 

20220125_200952.jpg

 

We liked the flavors. At first I preferred the beer-battered (Van de Kamp's) fish because it seemed just a touch more flavorful, but after a few bites I began to think the extra flavor was mostly salt. He preferred the panko-crusted (Gorton's) fish from start to finish, much to his surprise.

 

The upshot: we'll be happy with either, for a quick nobody-feels-like-cooking dinner, but we're more likely to keep Gorton's around. There are other brands, and other treatments, so we'll probably try them. I draw the line at fish sticks, though!

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The pork roast just came out of the oven, and if it's beautiful I'll post a picture of it. Otherwise, I won't bother; you've seen it and had the cooking method described before.

 

On the other hand, the latest iteration of fruit salad for his breakfast is a work of art, don't you think? 😁

 

20220126_180724.jpg

 

I even chopped dates for it. Never let it be said that I leave him without provisions.

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I have a question that I've been worrying over for quite some time.

With all the weird and crazy things that have been happening in the country for some time, how do you go out into some of these deserted places alone and feel safe?

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35 minutes ago, lindag said:

I have a question that I've been worrying over for quite some time.

With all the weird and crazy things that have been happening in the country for some time, how do you go out into some of these deserted places alone and feel safe?

Personally feel the fear hype is media fluff. As always one must be aware of surroundings.  Looking at media one would think Los Angeles is a scary hell-hole now. Nope. No real change. 

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2 hours ago, lindag said:

I have a question that I've been worrying over for quite some time.

With all the weird and crazy things that have been happening in the country for some time, how do you go out into some of these deserted places alone and feel safe?

 

I think Heidi answered it well. There's crazy stuff all around this country, but it doesn't seem to be as widespread as one would think from the news. (To be honest, I feel safer in the country than in cities! But that's my upbringing.) There are places we wouldn't consider camping, but the places we camp at seem safe - and everyone we've ever met has been delightful. 

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Given the weather most of you are experiencing, I probably won't get much sympathy when I say that it was 45F last night and we're in the second day of a wind storm. Two nights ago a cold front went through and the trailer started rocking as the wind blew. This was yesterday's sunrise, and later on the same mountain range that disappeared due to blowing dust.

 

20220202_144545.jpg

 

We went to town despite the weather. It was Old Farts Discount Day at Fry's groceries, and boy did we save money! (Translation: that 10% discount justifies far too much spending.) There were gaps in the grocery aisles, but overall the place was well stocked and we got what we needed. I didn't take any photos inside the store this time.

 

Seen on the way out of town: the vanished hills to the north (in the top picture) and part of a mural I keep wanting to show you. Maybe this way I'll remember to show you the whole thing. 

 

20220202_144908.jpg

 

Seen between town and our campsite: the hard-working picking crews, out in that wind and dust, harvesting our winter crops. I think this one was cabbage, but it could have been cauliflower, broccoli, lettuce, or several other row crops that are steadily planted, tended and harvested in what seems like astonishingly short times.

 

20220202_145016.jpg

 

Think of these people whenever you're eating fresh produce that, like me, you didn't grow yourself. 

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Backing up a little bit: while I was in San Diego my best friend and I cooked some fine meals and thoroughly enjoyed our visiting. For one dinner party we had a chicken tagine made more or less according to a recipe in Elizabeth Bard's charming Lunch in Paris: a Love Story, with Recipes (eG-friendly Amazon.com link), and served over couscous or rice depending on each guest's taste. The side dishes were a smashingly good green bean dish, and very thinly sliced cucumbers that had been marinated in vinegar for a few hours then drained, squeezed and shaped into little cones garnished with sumac.

 

20220202_145655.jpg

 

I'm cooking that green bean dish tonight, so I'll tell more about it in another post. Here's the recipe, as a placeholder: Green Bean Salad with Toasted Almonds and Feta. The need for the cucumbers to be thinly sliced sparked an email discussion about whether I had a mandoline that I could bring along, and was it really a mandoline or a madeleine? I'm afraid my email answer led to umbrage being taken, but we had some laughs about it later. We spent a lot of time discussing the virtues of various mandolines; if she buys one she'll want one that can also julienne. I came very near to pulling the trigger to buy one that would do that (mine is a cheapo adjustable slicer) and now, of course, all my online adverts are for mandolines!

 

We had one rather strange lunch in which she pulled out a package from the freezer that must have been left behind by their housesitter while they were away for the holidays.

 

20220128_122330.jpg

 

20220128_122335.jpg

 

Don't you love all the warning labels? 

 

We cooked it per directions, split it up, and decided that it needed crunch. Sunflower seeds did the trick.

 

20220202_150956.jpg

 

The best we could say about this was that it was innocuous. Not bad, but not something either of us would seek out. At least we got it out of the freezer!

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
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7 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Backing up a little bit: while I was in San Diego my best friend and I cooked some fine meals and thoroughly enjoyed our visiting. For one dinner party we had a chicken tagine made more or less according to a recipe in Elizabeth Bard's charming Lunch in Paris: a Love Story, with Recipes (eG-friendly Amazon.com link), and served over couscous or rice depending on each guest's taste. The side dishes were a smashingly good green bean dish, and very thinly sliced cucumbers that had been marinated in vinegar for a few hours then drained, squeezed and shaped into little cones garnished with sumac.

 

20220202_145655.jpg

 

I'm cooking that green bean dish tonight, so I'll tell more about it in another post. Here's the recipe, as a placeholder: Green Bean Salad with Toasted Almonds and Feta. The need for the cucumbers to be thinly sliced sparked an email discussion about whether I had a mandoline that I could bring along, and was it really a mandoline or a madeleine? I'm afraid my email answer led to umbrage being taken, but we had some laughs about it later. We spent a lot of time discussing the virtues of various mandolines; if she buys one she'll want one that can also julienne. I came very near to pulling the trigger to buy one that would do that (mine is a cheapo adjustable slicer) and now, of course, all my online adverts are for mandolines!

 

We had one rather strange lunch in which she pulled out a package from the freezer that must have been left behind by their housesitter while they were away for the holidays.

 

20220128_122330.jpg

 

20220128_122335.jpg

 

Don't you love all the warning labels? 

 

We cooked it per directions, split it up, and decided that it needed crunch. Sunflower seeds did the trick.

 

20220202_150956.jpg

 

The best we could say about this was that it was innocuous. Not bad, but not something either of us would seek out. At least we got it out of the freezer!

And at least you did not waste too many precious calories on it!

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On my way out of San Diego I found a Ralph's grocery and a World Market. I was on the hunt for Berbere spice from World Market, having discovered that the blends are not all created equal. They were out. There were MASSIVE gaps in their supplies! Ralph's grocery store claimed online that they carried the Greenland feta cheese we like. We're nearly out. Unfortunately, that must be another Ralph's in San Diego. This one didn't have it.

 

Still, it's an impressive store and I took a few pictures to give y'all a glimpse of yet another very nice grocery store. Their cheese selection is in a special area set off by itself, and the selection is massive.

 

20220202_161145.jpg

 

I didn't photograph the deli section, which was just as large, but some of their snack sausages were near the cheeses.

 

20220202_161306.jpg

 

I confess: I'd never thought of mac 'n' cheese as being a shredded cheese mix worth buying. I still don't.

 

The produce area is gorgeous. This is just a very small sample:

 

20220202_161033.jpg

 

Finally, for @rotuts, here's their olive bar. Keep in mind this is Southern California, in an area where masks are requested required although shopowners have given up enforcing it. They seem to have decided that some folks are okay with serving their own and others want it already packaged.

 

20220202_161420.jpg

 

Still...no Greenland feta cheese. I bought a sandwich for the road (roasted chicken, lettuce on a very nutty whole grain bread) and hit the road.

 

 

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Too funny. My Ralphs has their produce in the same order - even the zukes - green on left, "white"  on right :) think the little cucumber cones w/ sumac were worth the effort - as in you would repeat?

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4 minutes ago, heidih said:

Too funny. My Ralphs has their produce in the same order - even the zukes - green on left, "white"  on right :) think the little cucumber cones w/ sumac were worth the effort - as in you would repeat?

 

Yes, I'll definitely do the cukes again when it gets warmer!

 

I will say, however, that we were glad to have a large kitchen, plenty of counter space, and three of us working on dinner. He handled the couscous and rice, she handled the chicken and the cukes, I did the green beans - and we were barely ready when company arrived. The cukes can be done up to a day in advance, I think. I'll get clarification on that point.

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6 hours ago, heidih said:

Too funny. My Ralphs has their produce in the same order - even the zukes - green on left, "white"  on right :) think the little cucumber cones w/ sumac were worth the effort - as in you would repeat?

 

5 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Yes, I'll definitely do the cukes again when it gets warmer!

<snip>

The cukes can be done up to a day in advance, I think. I'll get clarification on that point.

 

Here was the procedure for the cukes, per my friend: 

Peel 2 medium to large cucumbers. Slice them very thinly (I think it was the smallest slot on my mandoline; basically, you want the slices so thin they're flexible and almost transparent.) Put them into a bowl.

 

Whisk about 1/2 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp sugar into about 1/2 cup vinegar. The friend who taught my friend this recipe used white wine vinegar, but we didn't have any. I don't remember whether we used rice vinegar, white vinegar, red wine vinegar or a mixture, but we decided later that the vinegar type probably doesn't matter. At any rate, it needs to be enough to cover the cucumbers, but just barely. Pour the mixture over the cuke slices and let them marinade for at least an hour. You want them to collapse and "wilt" somewhat in the marinade. 

 

Drain the cukes and squeeze the excess moisture out. Make little golf ball-sized mounds, squeezing with your fingers to shape them and drain out a bit more moisture. Place on a plate. Garnish with something of a contrasting color: I said sumac, but actually hers was so dark she used a little sprinkling of ground red pepper flakes instead.

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Look at that sun move north!

 

20220204_064056.jpg

Unfortunately, the wind is still howling. It lulled briefly yesterday evening - enough that my darling said "we could have cooked over a campfire!" By then I had made other plans for dinner. Sometime in the night the wind came up again - unusual for nighttime - and despite the furnace it was cold. Well, cold by our standards. 50F outside right now, with the wind chill making it more like 40F. I know, I won't get much sympathy. :) 

 

I didn't get around to doing the green beans yesterday as I'd planned, but I did try out a recipe that @Ann_T has shown to great advantage on the Dinner topic: Parmesan Crusted Halibut, as posted on her web site.

 

I am not as good a cook as Ann_T. 

 

The recipe looks so easy. Set up 3 bowls: one with flour, one with egg wash, one with a mixture of shredded parmesan, panko and lemon zest. Dredge, dip, then coat each filet. Pan-fry until one side develops a good golden brown crust, then flip the filets and put the pan into a 450F oven until the fish centers are "pearly white and opaque". 

 

My first issue was oven space. We also wanted Tater Tots, and they bake at the same 450F. The oven has only 1 rack, but I thought I could make the baking sheet of Tots and the pan of fish share that rack. I was mistaken. I had given the Tots a head start by 15 or 20 minutes, but still had to stack them atop the skillet while the fish finished cooking in the oven. (Doesn't the fish look beautiful after the initial flip?) 

 

20220203_194052.jpg

 

The problem with this method was that I had no easy way to check the fish without disturbing the tots. The recipe doesn't give a time estimate for how long the fish will take to arrive at that "pearly white and opaque" stage. I can tell you now that it's well under 10 minutes.

 

Pretty, isn't it?

 

20220203_190822.jpg

 

Travesty of travesties, the fish was terribly overcooked. 

 

20220203_191114.jpg

 

Hard, flavorless meat. Halibut isn't among my fish favorites anyway, but what little flavor it had was certainly cooked out because of my ineptitude. There ensued at the table a long, circular dissection of the dish. My darling was, and still is today, convinced that the fish filets were too thick for this method. I couldn't get him to acknowledge that a thinner filet would have been even more overcooked! To be honest, I think for him it's more about the coating than the fish itself.

 

The coating itself is fabulous, and the method is easy. I will try this again, probably with thinner filets, almost certainly with different fish. (I think - and hope - we're out of halibut now.) I think with a thinner fish I'll just pan-fry it on both sides and forget the oven. Then I'll have the oven available for tots, or better still for Ann_T's oven fries.

 

I also think I'll try that coating on chicken. Parmesan-crusted chicken, anyone? I think that will be excellent. 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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14 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Look at that sun move north!

 

20220204_064056.jpg

Unfortunately, the wind is still howling. It lulled briefly yesterday evening - enough that my darling said "we could have cooked over a campfire!" By then I had made other plans for dinner. Sometime in the night the wind came up again - unusual for nighttime - and despite the furnace it was cold. Well, cold by our standards. 50F outside right now, with the wind chill making it more like 40F. I know, I won't get much sympathy. :) 

 

I didn't get around to doing the green beans yesterday as I'd planned, but I did try out a recipe that @Ann_T has shown to great advantage on the Dinner topic: Parmesan Crusted Halibut, as posted on her web site.

 

I am not as good a cook as Ann_T. 

 

The recipe looks so easy. Set up 3 bowls: one with flour, one with egg wash, one with a mixture of shredded parmesan, panko and lemon zest. Dredge, dip, then coat each filet. Pan-fry until one side develops a good golden brown crust, then flip the filets and put the pan into a 450F oven until the fish centers are "pearly white and opaque". 

 

My first issue was oven space. We also wanted Tater Tots, and they bake at the same 450F. The oven has only 1 rack, but I thought I could make the baking sheet of Tots and the pan of fish share that rack. I was mistaken. I had given the Tots a head start by 15 or 20 minutes, but still had to stack them atop the skillet while the fish finished cooking in the oven. (Doesn't the fish look beautiful after the initial flip?) 

 

20220203_194052.jpg

 

The problem with this method was that I had no easy way to check the fish without disturbing the tots. The recipe doesn't give a time estimate for how long the fish will take to arrive at that "pearly white and opaque" stage. I can tell you now that it's well under 10 minutes.

 

Pretty, isn't it?

 

20220203_190822.jpg

 

Travesty of travesties, the fish was terribly overcooked. 

 

20220203_191114.jpg

 

Hard, flavorless meat. Halibut isn't among my fish favorites anyway, but what little flavor it had was certainly cooked out because of my ineptitude. There ensued at the table a long, circular dissection of the dish. My darling was, and still is today, convinced that the fish filets were too thick for this method. I couldn't get him to acknowledge that a thinner filet would have been even more overcooked! To be honest, I think for him it's more about the coating than the fish itself.

 

The coating itself is fabulous, and the method is easy. I will try this again, probably with thinner filets, almost certainly with different fish. (I think - and hope - we're out of halibut now.) I think with a thinner fish I'll just pan-fry it on both sides and forget the oven. Then I'll have the oven available for tots, or better still for Ann_T's oven fries.

 

I also think I'll try that coating on chicken. Parmesan-crusted chicken, anyone? I think that will be excellent. 

For me, baking fish is hard.  I do much better when I'm frying and can constantly "feel" ...or maybe "poke" is a better term...the fish.  If it's a really thick piece I even use my thermapen to check the temp.

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44 minutes ago, Shelby said:

For me, baking fish is hard.  I do much better when I'm frying and can constantly "feel" ...or maybe "poke" is a better term...the fish.  If it's a really thick piece I even use my thermapen to check the temp.

 

Thanks for that information. What internal temperature would you use in this case?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Sorry for your disappointment. I lik halibut. But how were you supposed to guage "pearly white and opaque" without bustng through the crust? I see @Shelby's thermapen suggestion. Otherwise?  

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