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Marlene

Camping, Princess Style

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I was intrigued by the suggestion of bathing in it for soft skin.  In this desert climate it might do wonders for me.  There are two problems, though: no bathtub, and no place to store that liquid until I have enough.  (If we had that kind of storage capability, my darling would have a beer keg refrigerator.)

 

And actually, I'm not sure I'd want to get into a vat of whey. O.o

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Breakfast, a couple of days ago: grilled cheese sandwiches on the last slices of herb bread.

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Because sometimes you just have to kick over the traces. This is comfort food, and I've been needing it.

 

Thanks to this topic about preferred cookware, I decided that I needed to use one of my clay pots. 

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I bought this in Egypt, thanks to Paula Wolfert's discussions in these forums about cooking in clay, and because I am crazy about Egyptian moussaka - which is made in pots like this.  They may excellent braisers: they provide even heat and somehow provide a more moist product than many of my metal pots.  (The background discussion is scattered around in the forums - Paula was one of the original eGullet enablers - but some of it can be seen here and here.) They can be used on stovetop, provided the heat changes aren't extreme, and they are oven safe.  In Egypt I saw them sitting in coals as the moussaka cooked.

 

Chicken, seasoned and browned....

 

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then smothered in mild Hatch chiles and their juice...

 

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and cooked in the oven until done.

 

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Meanwhile, green beans were being cooked with bacon and a number of vegetables on the stove top.

 

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I tend to forget about this chicken treatment when we're camping, because we so often cook chicken over the campfire.  But it's been windy, and it gets dark early, and I've had quite a few reasons to wimp out on campfire cookery the last few days.  This is a stellar way to treat chicken.  These thighs come out fork-tender and juicy, and the chiles add a nice seasoning.

 

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There were two thighs apiece, but we restrained ourselves and saved some for the next day's lunch.

 

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Yeah that chicken looks awesome.  I will have to try that.  

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Back to whey. You can make other cheeses from it. I've never done this (and it looks time-consuming), but here are some references to making a Scandinavian style cheese (gjetost from goat's milk, prim-ost or mysost when made from cow's milk). We often had Ski Queen gjetost in the house when I was a kid, but not everyone liked it as it has a caramel-type flavour, sweetish rather than the usual salty cheese tang. Maybe you've had that cheese? 

 

The first link mentions making this style of cheese from leftover yogurt-making. There's also a mention (and a link) in the second article about making Mexican dulce de leche from whey. 

 

http://blog.cheesemaking.com/prim-ost-anyone/

 

https://joybileefarm.com/make-gjetost-whey/

 

 

 

 

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34 minutes ago, FauxPas said:

We often had Ski Queen gjetost in the house when I was a kid, but not everyone liked it as it has a caramel-type flavour, sweetish rather than the usual salty cheese tang. Maybe you've had that cheese? 

 

I have indeed. Gjetost is easy to come by in the Duluth area, and a very dear friend who's quite proud of her Norwegian heritage made it a point to introduce me to it.  I thought it was okay - the sort of thing that I enjoy in the proper context (as in, skiing and picnicking with her) - but haven't been drawn to it on my own.  I did not know it was made from whey!

 

Thanks for those links.

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38 minutes ago, Smithy said:

I did not know it was made from whey!

 

I didn't either! Or if i did, it didn't really sink in. xD

 

I just happened to be browsing on iGourmet and was looking at their Norwegian gift baskets and saw their description of it as a whey cheese. Remembering the discussion of what to do with whey, I looked a bit further and found several references to making the cheese. 

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I had a friend who's parents were  2nd generation Norwegians in Wisconsin in the early 1900s.He once offered me some Gjetost , and said that his father's breakfast every morning was a slab of Gjetost on a piece of bread.

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My late DH was , in his words, “a Norse God” and had the T-shirt to prove it.

He introduced me to pickled herring, which I actually came to enjoy.

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4 hours ago, lindag said:

My late DH was , in his words, “a Norse God” and had the T-shirt to prove it.

He introduced me to pickled herring, which I actually came to enjoy.

 

A man of excellent taste - I love pickled herring!

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5 hours ago, lindag said:

My late DH was , in his words, “a Norse God” and had the T-shirt to prove it.

He introduced me to pickled herring, which I actually came to enjoy.

 

49 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

A man of excellent taste - I love pickled herring!

 

Pickled herring is quite definitely something that "took" with me when I moved up north!  Great stuff!

 

Lutefisk...well, not so much. I have my limits. 

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