Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Bastille Day


Recommended Posts

Just as we have some traditional foods associated with the Fourth Of July in the United States, I began to wonder if the same applies to France and their similar holiday.

Are there any specific foods for this celebration? :rolleyes:

The threads here to date, were focused primarily upon what restaurants served but what about personal, home meals?

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cookin' in Brooklyn on Discovery Home channel (286 on DirecTV) has a Bastille Day episode on this week (it airs about 7 more times, here's a link to the schedule). The show is sort of silly/kitch, in a way similar to Mario Eats Italy, only in Brooklyn, NY. In this episode, there was an interesting visit to D'Artagnan in Newark, NJ, then the host, Alan Harding, cooked various French or French inspired delicacies at a Bastille Day street fair in Brooklyn.

Recipes:

Merguez (Lamb Sausage) with Mustard
Rouille: French Mayonnaise
Grilled Duck Liver with Apricot and Bacon
Duck Salad
Peach and Blueberry Compote with Crepes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm. Bastille day. I'm really not sure. The New York Times has a list of a few French themed restaurants offering Bastille day specials. I have never had a special set kind of food on the Bastille day holiday, they don't grill meats and drink beer, that's for sure. It's a day off, a chance for the family to get together for a meal... When we've attended parties it has involved a lot of wine (but then again most parties with our friends do no matter what the occasion). The past 2 Bastille days we have had kebabs because we were out watching the fireworks and they had set up stands on every corner to feed the crowds. It was the only food available. But this year, if we're not rained out, the fireworks will take place on the 13th for some reason only known to the city of Lyon. Public transport is stopped as usual on any day involving a "fete".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never had a special set kind of food on the Bastille day holiday, they don't grill meats and drink beer,  that's for sure.  It's a day off, a chance for the family to get together for a meal...

Yeah but in Lyon, don't you have all those weird enclosed narrow Traboule corridors linking all the buildings, which would sort of prevent you from grilling because most of the buildings dont have backyards or outdoor terraces? Paris would be somewhat different in how they celebrate, right?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it seems as if the night before, ie the 13th, there is often a fireman's bal, an outside dancing shindig sort of late night bacchanal........in paris it might be in different arrondissments? and in paris, a parade on the 14th down champs elysees........

i think that food is such a part of everyday life in france that on this specific celebration there is nothing specific. of course thoughout the land there will be food celebrations all summer and into the autumn. fete du l'ail, fete des chataignes, fete de l'ailoli.......with long benches and tables set out in the town square, big pots of aioli, veggies, fish etc.

or the strawberry fest a friend just went to in perigord: a massive huge village large strawberry tart was on the menu and every body had a taste.

but try as i might i also haven't come up with that special dish which french people save to celebrate their independence day. cake perhaps? (please forgive.....).

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have never had a special set kind of food on the Bastille day holiday, they don't grill meats and drink beer,  that's for sure.  It's a day off, a chance for the family to get together for a meal...

Yeah but in Lyon, don't you have all those weird enclosed narrow Traboule corridors linking all the buildings, which would sort of prevent you from grilling because most of the buildings dont have backyards or outdoor terraces? Paris would be somewhat different in how they celebrate, right?

In Paris it's about the same thing as Lyon. There are sound systems set up, for dancing in squares thoughout the city. I don't think grilling even crosses the minds of the people here. We were in Paris a few years ago, and spent our Bastille day walking, and we did go to the Fireman's Bal where they were blasting techno music. What did we eat? I don't remember. The beer was expensive and hard to get. Last night we went outside for the fireworks. A lot of young people were drinking beer and blowing off firecrackers in the square in front of our house. Everything came to a stop, even the traffic along the Quai, when the fireworks started. Every other street corner was set up with a stand selling beer and kebab (lamb or veal) sandwiches.

I asked my husband if the French eat anything special, and he said no. I also quizzed a few people at work just to be sure and they confirmed that the menu on Bastille day is not something set like Fois gras on Christmas or Oysters on New Years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am cooking steak and fries and CANNELES!!! After a week drinking wine in St. Emillion and having canneles every day I am hooked on these French treats. The steak and fries seem to be on the menu of many French bistros. (such as Bouchon in Yountville) :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...

I'll be working. It's not a national holiday in America, obviously. The week is pretty packed for me, I also have special classes and a workshop lined up in celebration of Bastille day.

I'm getting a little homesick, especially since my mother is ill.

On Bastille everybody in Montmerle would gather for a picnic by the Saone, then go to the center of the village to dance and drink, and drink some more.

Mick Micheyl is a resident of Montmerle, she was a well known artist especially in the 60's in Paris. She was (possibly still is) associated with Les Dryades. She gave me one of my first jobs there. She would pick me up in her helicopter to take to work sometimes. I also had a room in the hotel. The chef was an old pro, in the finest sense. He worked in top tier places, including Michelin starred places. He would buy 35 different types of yogurt and we would spend a couple of hours doing a yogurt tasting. I was talking about this someone the other day, and he said, "What, a yogurt tasting? 35 different kinds?!??!"

I'm homesick and rambling a bit.

So what will you be doing for France's national holiday?

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what with all of the craziness around me, i completely forgot about Bastille Day. AND I'm going on a wine and food pairing in Bergerac from Sunday to Tuesday night--if only we could have stayed through the celebrations!

I'll be back in Blighty by the time the fireworks are going off on the other side of la manche!

happy Bastille Day, Farid! And i wish your mother health,

marlena

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've invited over a handful of friends for a French themed dinner. (we may not BE french, but we sure appreciate the bits of food & culture they send our way!)

The menu will include an array of french cheese, wine & olives of course.

I may even bust out & buy a loaf of Poulaine bread (one of the local stores has it FedExed in from Paris :biggrin: )

A lamb and olive roast from Nimes

The celery root and apple puree from Wolfert's "cooking of Southern France"

probably a red pepper and tomato salad or maybe a green salad with roasted chevre? (more cheese can't be wrong!)

and either a fresh fruit tart, Mont-blanc or Prunes in armagnac for dessert

plus whatever ice-cream/sorbet Bill feels like making that week.

Still a bit up in the air...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I usually do not celebrate, pretty much these days for the same reasons Farid mentionned. Nevertheless, one of the French bistros on my street in NY organizes something every year. They shut the street to traffic, dump tons of sand and set up some kind of Petanque tournament. This is all accompanied of course by a fair amount of food and drinks.

Never thought of participating, but I might this year if I have nothing else planned that day, just for the hell of it..

Sorry to hear about your mother Farid, bon courage..

"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chef Zadi, I thought your "rambling" was very nice. I wish your mother good health and I hope that you see her again soon. I will be spending the day preparing for our long-awaited two weeks in Paris. We arrive on the 19th, too late for the holiday, but we will celebrate nonetheless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's turning into more like Bastille week. I'm missing out on a grill this Saturday with friends in the aftertoon because I have to teach. In the evening though we have another get together, everyone wants couscous, roast chicken with preserved lemons and olives and few side dishes.

I already mentioned that the actual day and evening of I'll be teaching so I can't attend some of the special dinners at the local French restaurants, alot of the menus seem more Provence inspired for some reason.

Next weekend there's more a picnic with roast chicken, salad, cheeses, olives, bread, a fruit tart or chocolate cake, etc... (no pan bagnat)

I'll try to post some pics.

(To everyone who responded in this thread and via PM, thank you for you concerns about my mother. She should get through it, but she has chronic health problems.)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

alot of the menus seem more Provence inspired for some reason.

I noticed that in my own menu. Maybe it's because with summer all the lovely mediterannean type produce (peppers, tomatoes etc) is available, and that's what's on people's minds? From reading previous threads on this topic I gather there are no particular foods traditionally associated with Bastille Day to anchor a menu around so I just asked myself "what do I feel like cooking that's from my French repertoire?"

Most of my favorite dishes from my visits to Paris are a little heavier and don't seem right with warm weather. Of course that could be because I never visit Europe in the summer :smile:

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In honor of the people of France, and the spirit of liberte, egalite and fraternite we will leave the pits in our cherry clafoutis. (We will also learn how to put accents onto our e's.)

Mrs. B and I are scheduled to cook an "authentic" french bistro meal for eight on the night of the 16th -- our services were purchased at auction at our daughter's school -- so perhaps we'll turn that into a Bastille Day bash, late though it is.

Any suggestions on traditional Bastille Day dishes?

(Did I ever tell you about the time I wandered around Place du Bastille looking for the Bastille itself?) :laugh:

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In honor of the people of France, and the spirit of liberte, egalite and fraternite we will leave the pits in our cherry clafoutis.  (We will also learn how to put accents onto our e's.)

Mrs. B and I are scheduled to cook an "authentic" french bistro meal for eight on the night of the 16th -- our services were purchased at auction at our daughter's school -- so perhaps we'll turn that into a Bastille Day bash, late though it is.

Any suggestions on traditional Bastille Day dishes?

(Did I ever tell you about the time I wandered around Place du Bastille looking for the Bastille itself?) :laugh:

Typing French accents, another option and more.

You'll notice I rarely type in the accents.

A menu for a Bastille Day picnic would be pretty simple. Wine, bread, cheeses, charcuterie, maybe some savory tarts, pastries, etc... Most of it store bought.

For dinner if you want to do a bistro meal with a Bastille day theme, I'll post some menu suggestions later.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Camping in the high desert of Nevada, Ghost town, Steam Trains and a giant copper mine. Foie and French cheese for shacks.

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By dcarch
      Happy Bastille Day!
       
      As I was thinking of cooking something appropriate for today and have the music playing in the background. 
      I thought the lyrics of the France National Anthem can be slightly modified and used against the covid-19 tyranny. 
       
      I did make crepe for breakfast, but have not decided what to make for dinner. May be I will make something for tomorrow.
       
      Anyone have ideas?
       
      dcarch
       
       
    • By bleudauvergne
      Clafoutis de Fevettes au Parmesean et Basilic
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      This recipe appears in French in issue no. 140 of the Saveurs magazine as part of a series of recipes accompanying an article on 'primeurs', or local vegetables that appear at the markets only during the first few weeks of Spring.
      It can be prepared with feves that have been frozen fresh, but I would not recommend using dried beans.
      This recipe should work fine with both American all purpose and French type 55 flour, as the quantity called for is slight in comparison to the other ingredients.

      500 g fresh young feves
      4 eggs
      20 cl milk
      10 cl heavy cream (liquid)
      70 g freshly grated parmesean
      2 T flour
      1 small bouquet of basil
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
      fresh ground white pepper

      Preheat your oven to 160 C / 320 F.
      Blanche the feves a large pot of boiling salted water and refresh in cold water. Drain and reserve.
      Combine the eggs, the milk and cream in a large bowl and beat until well combined.
      Wash and dry the basil, remove the leaves from the stems and mince it finely.
      Add the salt, the flour, the parmesean, the pepper, the grated nutmeg, and the freshly minced basil. Add the young feves.
      Butter a clafoutis dish (noted in the recipe as 'un plat a clafoutis', but which a deep sided 10" square dish such as a corningwear would work, or a large loaf pan), give the batter a last mix, pour it into the pan, and put it in the pre-heated oven. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown and the center seems firm when you shake the pan.
      Serve it hot or cold, with a simple roquette salad or with chicken, rabbit, or veal. Goes well with a good rose champagne.
      Keywords: Main Dish, French, Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Easy
      ( RG1243 )
    • By bleudauvergne
      Clafoutis de Fevettes au Parmesean et Basilic
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      This recipe appears in French in issue no. 140 of the Saveurs magazine as part of a series of recipes accompanying an article on 'primeurs', or local vegetables that appear at the markets only during the first few weeks of Spring.
      It can be prepared with feves that have been frozen fresh, but I would not recommend using dried beans.
      This recipe should work fine with both American all purpose and French type 55 flour, as the quantity called for is slight in comparison to the other ingredients.

      500 g fresh young feves
      4 eggs
      20 cl milk
      10 cl heavy cream (liquid)
      70 g freshly grated parmesean
      2 T flour
      1 small bouquet of basil
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
      fresh ground white pepper

      Preheat your oven to 160 C / 320 F.
      Blanche the feves a large pot of boiling salted water and refresh in cold water. Drain and reserve.
      Combine the eggs, the milk and cream in a large bowl and beat until well combined.
      Wash and dry the basil, remove the leaves from the stems and mince it finely.
      Add the salt, the flour, the parmesean, the pepper, the grated nutmeg, and the freshly minced basil. Add the young feves.
      Butter a clafoutis dish (noted in the recipe as 'un plat a clafoutis', but which a deep sided 10" square dish such as a corningwear would work, or a large loaf pan), give the batter a last mix, pour it into the pan, and put it in the pre-heated oven. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown and the center seems firm when you shake the pan.
      Serve it hot or cold, with a simple roquette salad or with chicken, rabbit, or veal. Goes well with a good rose champagne.
      Keywords: Main Dish, French, Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Easy
      ( RG1243 )
    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...