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Fish and other seafood


Adam Balic
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I don't think so. Lizardfish belong to the genus Synodus, the most common European water one is the Atlantic Lizardfish (Synodus saurus or "Poisson-Lézard de l'Atlantique" in French :wink: .

Atlantic Lizardfish

There a numerous Scorpionfish species in USA waters, these belong to the genus Scorpaen (mostly) and are pretty much ignored by the local population.

One USA Scorpionfish

Edited by Adam Balic (log)
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What does "Zarganes" translate to if anything?

adam,

the only other meaining of the word in modern greek is " a tall, good looking woman"!

it is possible that the fisherman who named the fish was somehow thinking of his wife, girlfriend, ...

cheers

athinaeos

civilization is an everyday affair

the situation is hopeless, but not very serious

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Greek sense of humour I imagine. Or maybe a sailor that had not seen a women for a very long time.. :rolleyes:

the strange things of language!

today in Grreece it is rare to hear a man on the street expressing his enthusiasm for a woman using the term "zargana"

another fish name that is also used rarely in the same context is "melanouri", which is directed to women of rather darker, choclate-like complexity

the fish name in english is "saddled seabream" (oblada melanura)

the word "melan" in ancient greek means "dark"

i confess that i do not know of fish names used by women to express their enthusiasm for men - sorry! :wink:

athinaeos

civilization is an everyday affair

the situation is hopeless, but not very serious

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all seafood was located in Manila, Phillipines

Slipper Lobsters

gallery_2507_1786_1848043.jpg

Female on the right, Male on the Left Crabs

gallery_2507_1786_1187744.jpg

a Huge crab happily alive

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after a wonderful addition of butter and garlic

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some type of scallop and it's roe. would this have been dangerous to eat?

gallery_2507_1786_375320.jpg

green grouper which if i recall correctly is called lapu-lapu

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green grouper steamed with soy and scallions

gallery_2507_1786_909330.jpg

Yield to Temptation, It may never come your way again.

 --Lazarus Long

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Possibly the most important fish species in the Europe Gadus morhua "Cod". These are salt cured cod on sale in the Mercato Centrale (Florence). Notice the wide range to grades availble and where they come from. Are the still cod in Labradorian fishing grounds or does the name refer to a particular grade (such as "West Indian" salt cod)? I also like the fact that one of the most isolated islands on the planet is well represented here.

gallery_1643_811_714421.jpg

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adam,

talking about cod,

you remeinded me of two memorable dishes from the basque country:

1. bacalao pil-pil

2. kokotxas (cod cheeks) with garlic and chili peppers

and the San Sebastian market, where you can get the best cod in the world!

athinaeos

civilization is an everyday affair

the situation is hopeless, but not very serious

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Possibly the most important fish species in the Europe Gadus morhua "Cod". These are salt cured cod on sale in the Mercato Centrale (Florence). Notice the wide range to grades availble and where they come from. Are the still cod in Labradorian fishing grounds or does the name refer to a particular grade (such as "West Indian" salt cod)? I also like the fact that one of the most isolated islands on the planet is well represented here.

Adam, Labrador is on the mainland of Canada, and is part of our 10th province, Newfoundland and Labrador. So, I think the sign is referring to the Grand Banks, off the shore of Nfld. It is still a source of cod (morue) though the fishery is closed from overfishing. I can always find cod, fresh or salted, in Canadian stores, but this may come from nets that were meant to catch something else.

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So it is likely that the sign referes to a pticular grade of Salt Cod, rather then to where the fish was caught as it seems unlikely that this fish actually came from the Grand Banks. Maybe.

Yes, maybe.

I have never seen a grade of salt cod here, labelled "Labrador". What I do find, is (1) large skateboard cod, requiring a lot of soaking, in many ethnic stores, such as Caribbean or Portuguese, or Spanish; (2) A softer, boneless cod, packed in poly wrap, usually from Nova Scotia, but still "Grand Banks" though the fishery is banned within our 200 mile limit. Labrador is within the limit, as well, but there is a lot of rule breaking, by Canadian and foreign trawlers.

I buy the softer version because it freshens easily. I have been served bacala and cod with ackee in Portuguese and Caribbean restaurants in Toronto that was too salty for me. And too bony, but this is a matter of taste, and culture.

For those on a budget, salt cured pollack is available, but doesn't have the same taste.

We can also get salted and smoked haddock from Eastern Canada. Great for chowder.

When visiting the area, you can find a lot of home curing and smoking for sale, by the roadside, in the Atlantic provinces, as well as Quebec.

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I also like the fact that one of the most isolated islands on the planet is well represented here.

:blink: ... you mean you weren't talking about the Faroe Islands??? Next to the Labrador cod there are "Faroese Gigante"... The Faroe Islands are pretty isolated.

"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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So it is likely that the sign referes to a pticular grade of Salt Cod, rather then to where the fish was caught as it seems unlikely that this fish actually came from the Grand Banks. Maybe.

Yes, maybe.

I have never seen a grade of salt cod here, labelled "Labrador". What I do find, is (1) large skateboard cod, requiring a lot of soaking, in many ethnic stores, such as Caribbean or Portuguese, or Spanish; (2) A softer, boneless cod, packed in poly wrap, usually from Nova Scotia, but still "Grand Banks" though the fishery is banned within our 200 mile limit. Labrador is within the limit, as well, but there is a lot of rule breaking, by Canadian and foreign trawlers.

I buy the softer version because it freshens easily. I have been served bacala and cod with ackee in Portuguese and Caribbean restaurants in Toronto that was too salty for me. And too bony, but this is a matter of taste, and culture.

For those on a budget, salt cured pollack is available, but doesn't have the same taste.

We can also get salted and smoked haddock from Eastern Canada. Great for chowder.

When visiting the area, you can find a lot of home curing and smoking for sale, by the roadside, in the Atlantic provinces, as well as Quebec.

It is possible that the grading system is added at a latter stage then point of origin I guess. Mark Kurlansky mentions that for historical reasons the poorest quality salt cod was graded as Caribbean or West Indian.

This market in Florence also sold presoaked stuff, so that you didn't have to bother with it yourself, some of the higher grades were pearl white and nearly three inches thich.

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A new fish for me "Cusk" Brosme brosme. This is a cod relative and looks a little like a Burbot/Eelpout (although this is a freshwater fish). Nice white flesh, good flavour, not quite as flakey as Cod. Having filleted the fish I know why it isn't more commonly seen, the skin in incredibly tough and slimey, making it hard to work with.

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Incidently, people sometimes ask about worms in fish on egullet. Here is one encysted in the fishes flesh. I don't think that I have had a fish that didn't have a few worms like this.

gallery_1643_978_343926.jpg

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They look great, what would the basic sambal recipe be, I have one for cuttlefish, but that sauce looks a little more orange?

Not a sambal...but this recipe should more or less be what's in a balitong sauce.

3 tablesp oil

5 cm knob of young ginger

4 cloves garlic

Combine:

1 teasp dark soya sauce

1 tablesp light soya sauce

1 tablesp sugar

1/2 teasp salt

1 tablesp lime or lemon

10 - 12 bird's eye chillies, sliced

5 shallots, sliced

2 - 3 stalks spring onion, cut into 1 cm lengths.

Mince together the young ginger and garlic and fry till fragrant in the oil. Add the combined sauce. Cook till it boils and thickens. Switch off heat and add chillies, shallots and spring onion.

This thread is so amazing...a lot of seafood I've never seen before. Thanks, (I think), for the worm in the fish pic...I was wondering about that, never having seen or was in the look-out for those crawlies before. Eew.

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Mark - are they fennel stalks with the turbot?

More Greek fish. From a recent trip to Hydra, some very large baked grouper (will work out species later), these fish had meat of the same texture and a similar flavor to milk fed veal. Still feel bad about eating these large fish though.

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Another view of this huge fish

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