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ckbklady

Movies/Films with Food-Related Themes

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Speaking of school boys cooking, have you ever seen 'Gregory's Girl'? One of the lads is a burgeoning pastry chef who runs a nice business out of the boys restroom selling pastries and tarts. He prides himself on developing the perfect pate a choux :biggrin:

I did see Gregory's Girl at about the same time, and theater even, that I saw Eating Raoul, but I have zero recollection of the pastry chef.

Need to see if they have that at Blockbuster now...

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What is this Bandits movie you folks are talking about? I did a search for it on Internet Movie Datbase and didn't come up with anything that sounded like a match.

Big Night is wonderful and always makes me hungry. When they unmold that giant ball of foody goodness I want to climb through the screen.

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Like Water for Chocolate is an incredibly sensual food movie. I nearly weep when I think of the rose petal sauce. Nothing could possibly sound more delicious. The passion between the lovers is really remarkable.

Babette's Feast is more intellectual, but also a very serious foodie movie.

How come no one mentioned Soul Food? Great cooking and family eating scenes in there.

Chocolat was a very sweet movie (pun intended). They found the only thing that could make Johnny Depp even sexier. They gave him a wonderful brogue. I remain a fool for a guy with an accent :wub:

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So apparently Martin Scorsese is in discussions with Warner Bros. to direct a new adaption of "Willie Wonka/Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" (whichever they decide to call this new adaption).  Click here for the Internet Rumor mill.

Had to update this. Further rumors have Johnny Depp or Christopher Walken (!!) starring as Wonka.

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What is this Bandits movie you folks are talking about? I did a search for it on Internet Movie Datbase and didn't come up with anything that sounded like a match.

Bandits

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Speaking of school boys cooking, have you ever seen 'Gregory's Girl'? One of the lads is a burgeoning pastry chef who runs a nice business out of the boys restroom selling pastries and tarts. He prides himself on developing the perfect pate a choux :biggrin:

The same director, Bill Forsythe, made the movie COMFORT AND JOY about a mob war over ice cream fritter (fried ice cream) trucks. It's like most of his movies, quirky characters, slow but intricate plot, and a great sense of place.

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Speaking of school boys cooking, have you ever seen 'Gregory's Girl'? One of the lads is a burgeoning pastry chef who runs a nice business out of the boys restroom selling pastries and tarts. He prides himself on developing the perfect pate a choux :biggrin:

The same director, Bill Forsythe, made the movie COMFORT AND JOY about a mob war over ice cream fritter (fried ice cream) trucks. It's like most of his movies, quirky characters, slow but intricate plot, and a great sense of place.

Bill Forsythe's film are absolutely wonderful. I forgot about 'Comfort and Joy' - a real jem, thanks for the reminder.

Did you ever see 'That Sinking Feeling' about a group of somewhat inept theives who steal a bunch of kitchen sinks? Two other great favs - 'Local Hero' with Burt Lancaster and 'Housekeeping' with Christine Lahti.

Forsythe is truly an original. :smile:

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Tampopo

Awright I have some questions. I hate to break topic, but I gotta know how others feel about this.

Lets start at the end of the movie.

Is it fair to say the the child at his mother's breast is a statement that we all start out both needing and liking food?

Do we then look at the child and ask the question: "How is life going to skew this one's view of food? Is he going to be like one of those guys that said 'I'll have the sole and consume and no salad (I really don't give a crap about food, it's all politics)' or is he going to be like the kid who doesn't care that his bosses treat him like crap, but knows his food, in fact lives for it, or perhaps like one of those people who are willing to stand in line just because they know they love and need good food?"

Who was the guy in the white suit and why did he get shot at the same time Tampopo became a success? Who shot him, did we, by liking the outcome?

Yes, I made Ramen noodles right after each of the two time I watched it. I probably will the next time too.

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I went back over this whole thread to see if anyone had mentioned Eating Raoul. Was tickled to read a few other references to this Buck Henry wit-fest.

I have it on tape and watch it often. Absolutely hilarious. And in case no one remembers the entire plot - the whole reason Mr. & Mrs. Bland are up to their Minnie Mouse ears in such nefarious business is because they need the money to open a restaurant.

So they take to bopping would-be swingers over the head with a heavy cast iron skillet (and then stealing the dead man's money and selling his car to the equally larcenous Raoul). One of my favorite lines in the movie was when Mrs. Bland was standing there in the kitchen, wearing her happy homemaker apron and contemplating the murder weapon that had been used to dispatch so many hapless suitors. She turns to her husband and says, "I think I'd like to buy another skillet. Somehow it just doesn't feel right scrambling eggs in this one."

:laugh:

And another of my favorite "food movies" was, although not technically about food, "Frida."

Shot in Mexico, many of the scenes take place around sumptuous tables laden with the delicious fresh Mexican food that I so adore. I was absolutely overcome with the desire to have some of it.

And I don't mean that stuff that you get in Mexican restaurants in the US. I mean the REAL DEAL. There was simply nothing else for it. Three days later, I was sitting in Mexico enjoying some of it for my own self. I hadn't been able to stand it. I had gotten in the car and driven six hours to satiate my cravings for charro beans and carne a la parilla and guacamole and chilaquiles and cocteles campechana and on and on.

And oh man was it good.

:rolleyes:


Edited by Jaymes (log)

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Here are a few older films that for me had a few striking food moments:

Ted Kotcheff's 1978 film Who is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? starring George Segal and Jacqueline Bisset. I think I saw this on a flight to London.... This film has everything -- murder mystery, comedy and a love story. Disturbing though as all of the greatest chefs of Europe are being killed off according to their speciality (one dies in a duckpress, another is roasted like roast beef). Anyone remember this?

Director Bille August's coming of age Danish/Swedish 1988 film Pelle the Conqueror starring Max Von Sydow. A sentimental and touching film of a Swedish father and son immigrating to Denmark in search of a better life for his son and enjoys some of the stolen small luxuries holding onto the desire to drink coffee in bed on Sunday mornings and secretly enjoying some smuggled Swedish strawberrries in the bleak, cold, hard grey Stone Farm setting.

John Boorman's 1987 British film Hope and Glory -- in particular the patriarch's return home from the battlefront with an acquired tin of German jam on Christmas day. They were hesitant to taste, but seconds later the urge took control and all dug in with their spoons to enjoy the simple pleasure. Another fav, later in the film, the two young children being sent out in the row boat onto the river to catch fish for dinner. The littlest one, a lovely young lady of about 5 years old, exclaimed with the most heart felt, sour face "I hate Grandpa!" to her older brother when told not to return without fish.

Like Water for Chocolate -- the beginning when the young central character is being babysat by Grandma in the kitchen. She's seated in a high chair and relishes with great zeal picking up a large, thick onion slice and chomping into it with glee.

I remember one of the best Cleveland restaurants (the once thriving and famed French Connection at Stouffer's Hotel on Public Square) recreated Babette's Feast. Perhaps it was a fundraiser?

Mmmm food.

MMMMMMMmmmmmm cinema.

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Bill Forsythe's film are absolutely wonderful. Two other great favs - 'Local Hero' with Burt Lancaster and 'Housekeeping' with Christine Lahti.  Forsythe is truly  an original. :smile:

Local Hero is still, and will always be one of my favorite films of all time. Utterly quirky and hysterical, alternately bizarre and touching. Great stuff and a must see rental for anyone that hasn't seen it. Get a bottle of wine and get a little loopy before you watch and you'll laugh your butt off. :biggrin:

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Three days later, I was sitting in Mexico enjoying some of it for my own self.  I hadn't been able to stand it.  I had gotten in the car and driven six hours to satiate my cravings for charro beans and carne a la parilla and guacamole and chilaquiles and cocteles campechana and on and on. 

You are soooo lucky and I am so jealous you can do that...! I too was soo hungry at the end of Frida I had to come home and make chilaquiles, the quickest thing I could think of... Have you seen the book? Nice recipes.

I don't think anyone has mentioned "What's Cooking", the 4 families at Thanksgiving - interesting to see all the different styles of food.

There was also an Australian movie about a woman and her daughter and the aunt comes to visit and cooks up all kinds of storms after her husband leaves her - can't remember the name, takes place in the 50's.

And I saw a bit of a movie, probably American telemovie, where Scott Baio plays a baker (?) keep missing it...

Anyone?

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Just remembered - La Spagnola is the Australian movie - there is a good scene with a zucchini! Which also reminded me of Divine's fillet of beef which has been marinating all day in her "special sauce"....

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I think Dinner Rush came out in limited release and is now on video but it has been one of my favorite food movies. My video store recently got Mostly Martha which was excellant. No video store in my city has Big Night which is by far my favorite. What about rumors of the Tony Bourdain bio on film ? I don't remember where I heard that but... I think that would be great flick to see.

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In the works: negotiations are underway for Sam Mendes (American Beauty, Road to Perdition) to film Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street. Let's face it, there may be food scenes in musicals, but there aren't many musicals where the preparation of food figures as importantly in the plot as it does in this one. :biggrin::raz::biggrin:

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Not sure if this message board is still active, but there are some great food scenes in the film "Defending Your Life" (which coincidentally is one of my favorite movies!). Pretty funny stuff - basically revolves around the food in the afterlife - everything tastes great, and has no negative effects (fat, cholesterol, etc.). Oh, and you gotta love Albert Brooks dryness to really appreciate this film!

Anyone else seen this movie???

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Anyone else seen this movie???

Yes, it's one of my favorites.

All three Godfather movies have great food scenes in them, as does Goodfellas. In fact I credit my interest in Italian cooking to Godfather I and Big Night.

Incidentally I saw a preview for Willy Wonka last night . . . it looks . . . interesting.

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I love Babette's Feast, I had to watch it in a college french class and was mesmerized. I think that sealed my interest in working in the food industry some day. It was an artform in that film.

I also adore Chocolat. I'm with KatieLoeb, Johnny Depp with an accent is like gilding the lily. I am also a sucker for accents.

My mother saw a preview for the new "Willy Wonka" with Mr. Depp and she also said it looked interesting. I think I might have to go see "Lemony Snicket" just so I can see the preview for "Willy Wonka", which is one of my favorite all time movies. Period.

I must admit an affection for a newer foodie type film, although it leans more towards the wannabe wine geek in me, Sideways. Not the best movie I have ever seen, but just so genuine and beautifully acted.

Shannon

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Tam-popo. Tam-popo. Tam-popo.

The Big Night. I loved the simple breakfast scene at the end.

Eat, Drink, Man, Woman. Also Ang Lee's The Wedding Banquet.

Ditto! I love these films.

My favorite scene in Big Night is also the awesome breakfast scene. So glad to hear someone apprecites it as much as I do.

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I forgot about another film that I really love. It's called "Bread and Chocolate" and it was shot at Le Beau Rivage in Lucerne. There is a scene with the waiter trying to peel an orange with madame watching... it's priceless.

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Although not a film, as such, the PBS classic, I Claudius, is poignant to me when Nero and his mother poison Claudius (Old King Log) and he eats the mushrooms willingly, while knowin' full well they are deadly.

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Just last week caught "Le Divorce" with Kate Hudson on cable. The film is set in Paris, and there are many, many beautiful plates prominently featured, as much of the action takes place in upscale restaurants. Not just food happening to be in a scene, but deliberate, overhead shots of the plates.

Also, "Woman on Top", starring Selma Hayek as a Brazilian chef that comes to New York and gets her own cooking show. Fluffy little movie, but great food scenes.

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Woman on Top was actually Penelope Cruz, but still a great food flick! Made me want to swim directly to Bahia for some spicy shrimp. Also loved the coffee maker that was used... sort of a cloth bag contraption. Anyone know what that was?

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The musical Gigi was on Turner Classic Movies the other day. There is a great scene where Gaston opens the lid of a pot and smells inside, saying that it smells good. "Just a pork cassoulet..." Mamita Alvarez explains, "It was impossible to get any goose this week." She adds wistfully. Gaston promises to send up a brace from the country.

Later, while Gigi and Gaston are playing cards, Gigi asks what he is having for dinner that night. (This is all preceeding the Night They Invented Champagne song). Gaston answer the question, "Oh, the usual.... filet of sole with muscles, for a change. And filet of lamb with truffles. But it can't compare with your Grandmother's cassoulet!"

All-in-all, one of my favorite scenes, but the entire movie is studded with foodie bits (Uncle Honore offering him some cheese, the entire Champagne song, teaching Gigi to eat ortolons, etc.)

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All of comic genius Jacques Tati's classic Hulot films have extremely funny bits involving food, cooking and restaurants, from the hyper-modern home kitchen in Mon Oncle, to the ka-thunking restaurant door in M. Hulot's Holiday, to the built-in barbecue in the prototype car in Traffic. But the height of Tati's talent for good-hearted wry commentary is expressed in the second half of the brilliant Playtime, which builds to its hysterical climax of a restaurant's most disastrous and hilarious opening night.

As Suzanne_F notes, those in New York can see a newly-restored 70mm print of Playtime at the Walter Reade Theater through January 5. I caught this print when it was here in San Francisco at the Castro this summer. It's truly amazing. Don't miss it if you can.

(I also love many of the films mentioned above, including Tampopo, Big Night and Mostly Martha.)

Cheers,

Squeat

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