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Distinctly Canadian


Marlene
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Liberty/Liberté. United Statesians regularly ask Montrealers to bring tubs of Liberty cream cheese (the only cream cheese worthy of being schmeared on a St-Viateur bagel) with them when they visit. And going by comments on the Montreal, Quebec and Eastern Canada forum and the Chowhound Montreal board, the dessert yogurt line (apple pie; cranberry orange; cranberry rhubarb; cranberry strawberry; cranberry blueberry; coconut; fig, date and raisin; orange marzipan; etc.) has developed a States-side cult following.

Oooh yes, the Liberty yogurt is so good. Forget the flavoured ones, even just their regular yogurt is fantastic. My family is like a Liberty yogurt cult - we spend a few weeks by the seaside in Nova Scotia every summer, and I swear we spend half the time driving around the nearby little towns trying to hunt some down!

Cutting the lemon/the knife/leaves a little cathedral:/alcoves unguessed by the eye/that open acidulous glass/to the light; topazes/riding the droplets,/altars,/aromatic facades. - Ode to a Lemon, Pablo Neruda

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Liberty/Liberté. United Statesians regularly ask Montrealers to bring tubs of Liberty cream cheese (the only cream cheese worthy of being schmeared on a St-Viateur bagel) with them when they visit. And going by comments on the Montreal, Quebec and Eastern Canada forum and the Chowhound Montreal board, the dessert yogurt line (apple pie; cranberry orange; cranberry rhubarb; cranberry strawberry; cranberry blueberry; coconut; fig, date and raisin; orange marzipan; etc.) has developed a States-side cult following.

I have shamelessly driven hundreds of miles to fill a cooler with yogurt from the Liberte dessert series... but the last time I checked, only the apple pie, orange marzipan, coconut, fig/date/raisin and banana royale (nasty) were available (carswell, I do remember you mentioning in a different thread that an unpleasant addition, 'blueberry muffin', had been made). What's up with all the new flavors involving cranberry? Any good?

Inform me, please.

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Another Liberty fan but good lord is it expensive when compared to other brands.

I think many Canadian items have been cited but to the question of chcoloate bars I can confirm that in my brief stint with Nestlé there existed an entire room of Nesquick bottles and their respective formulas, all with slight variations in makeup, packaging and so on. it was amazing to see the different labels...some shhowed it being used on ice cream, otehrs showed it being mixed with milk..

There was a similiar room for chocolate bars with noticeable differences in fat, milk and sugar content. I seem to recall the UK version that we produced for export was the best tasting because it had a higher percentage of sugar and butter fat.

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What's up with all the new flavors involving cranberry? Any good?

They're seasonal (the packaging reads "4 seasons, 4 fruits"): cranberry orange for winter, cranberry rhubarb for spring, cranberry strawberry for summer and cranberry blueberry for fall (go figure). Of course, it's just a marketing gimmick. First, they can't be using fresh fruit. Second, they're probably looking to cash in on the purported health benefits of cranberries (they prevent urinary tract infections, night blindness, cancer and the heartbreak of psoriasis, you know). In any case, you'll usually find only one of the four on sale at a given time. All are good, though the cranberry rhubarb is very mild and not particularly rhubarby and the cranberry strawberry just tastes like zingy strawberry. (Wonder why they or some other enterprising yogurt manufacturer isn't marketing the obvious strawberry rhubarb). Cranberry blueberry is neat because both flavours remain distinguishable.

Edited by carswell (log)
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Does a "Mr Sub" count?

I realize that the USA also has grinders etc but the soft white bun, the abundance of veggies and the "sub sauce" still make it distinctive to me.

How about sweet and sour rye?

Edited by Bernaise (log)

Life! what's life!? Just natures way of keeping meat fresh - Dr. who

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Canadian Rye bread

Am I missing something? There are good rye breads available all over Canada, but many are similar to those in the U.S. or Europe. I have heard of Boor St W. stores importing true rye dough from the Baltic countries, but I am at a loss to think of distinctive Canadian rye bread.

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Canadian Rye bread

Am I missing something? There are good rye breads available all over Canada, but many are similar to those in the U.S. or Europe. I have heard of Boor St W. stores importing true rye dough from the Baltic countries, but I am at a loss to think of distinctive Canadian rye bread.

Well, here in Manitoba, we have two bakerys that sell it , Guns and City bread. If you came here, or visited, you would know what I am talking about. It is very simulare to a cracked wheat with caraway, it's a whole rye flour, rather then a dark rye bread. Tastes diff, looks diff, and is only from here.

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Well, here in Manitoba, we have two bakerys that sell it , Guns and City bread.

I always thought of their breads as good Jewish Rye, not Canadian... I have had similar elsewhere. :huh: Good stuff though :biggrin:

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