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Distinctly Canadian


Marlene
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Poutine

Tarte au sucre

Seal flipper pie  :blink:

Tourtiere

Smoked salmon and candied salmon ("Indian Candy")

Montreal smoked meat

Maple syrup candy

Ketchup-flavoured potato chips

Coffee Crisp chocolate bars  :wub:

Nanaimo bars

I love "Indian Candy" - I always grab a handful from caviar direct when at the St Lawrence Market.

Coffee Crisp

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And someone took poutine off their list? don't tell me they have them in France?! It's actually just as well I don't live within delivery distance of a decent poutine any more. And the poutine italienne--oh boy.

'Twas I. But only because Mooshmouse beat me to it. All signs point to poutine's being invented in Warwick, Quebec, in the '80s. See here.

Edited by carswell (log)
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And someone took poutine off their list? don't tell me they have them in France?! It's actually just as well I don't live within delivery distance of a decent poutine any more. And the poutine italienne--oh boy.

'Twas I. But only because Mooshmouse beat me to it. All signs point to poutine's being invented in Warwick, Quebec, in the '80s. See here.

You've never eaten one? :shock:

I'm so sorry!

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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No, the one I had was vodka, Clamato, Worchestershire, and beef broth.Could be cold or hot. PLayboy was where it came from. But I only read the ads.

I think you're thinking of a Bloody Bull, which I suppose could be made with Clamato, although it's giving me a headache thinking about it.

The Moscow Mule is something else altogether.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Expanding on the preceding post, according to Dave Broom in the New American Bartender's Handbook:

Back in the 1940s, when America hadn't woken up to vodka, John Martin of the drinks import company, Heublein, met in New York with Jack Morgan, the owner of the Cock 'n' Bull restaurant in Hollywood, California. Morgan had landed himself with a surplus of ginger beer, which was proving difficult to shift.

Martin wanted to get rid of the equally slow-moving Smirnoff vodka, for which he'd put his reputation on the line. Morgan and Martin put their heads and their products together, added a splash of lime juice, and created the Moscow Mule.

They then ordered 500 copper mugs engraved with a kicking mule and marketed it to cocktail bars. On the backpack of the mule, Smirnoff vodka's sales tripled between 1947 and 1950, and then doubled again the year after. America would never be the same again.

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Dave- I'm sorry that that's what you found on the net, but I do remember the cups, and what went in them. My daughter still has them, but that is the recipe on them. My husband and his fly buddies went for them, the only reason I particularly remember that. Vodka gags me.

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No, the one I had was vodka, Clamato, Worchestershire, and beef broth.Could be cold or hot. PLayboy was where it came from. But I only read the ads.

I think you're thinking of a Bloody Bull, which I suppose could be made with Clamato, although it's giving me a headache thinking about it.

The Moscow Mule is something else altogether. (And -- need I say it again? -- not Canadian).

Now *that* sounds delicious. They may revoke my citizenship, but I don't like Clamato.

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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Dave- I'm sorry that that's what you found on the net, but I do remember the cups, and what went in them. My daughter still has them, but that is the recipe on them. My husband and his fly buddies went for them, the only reason I particularly remember that. Vodka gags me.

I believe you. The copper mug is traditional for a Moscow Mule, so that makes sense. On the other hand, the history of (and recipe for) the cocktail is particularly well documented. Confusing, isn't it?

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I'm not claiming Clamato juice is Canadian, but the Bloody Ceasar certainly is. Now, can we move on? I'd prefer we didn't turn this into a clamato juice debate. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I'm not claiming Clamato juice is Canadian, but the Bloody Ceasar certainly is.    Now, can we move on?  I'd prefer we didn't  turn this into a clamato juice debate.

I started a Clamato thread so discussion can continue on there if wanted... The thread also has a link to pre-existing "Bloody Caesar" thread...

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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[...]Then theris Buckwheat Honey; is that still sold in the U.S.?

I haven't tried to buy any lately, but I can't see why it wouldn't be sold here anymore. I don't have honey a lot, but buckwheat honey has a wonderful buckwheaty, earthy taste.

Someone mentioned Kit Kat bars as particularly Canadian? Is there a distinct Canadian version thereof? I ask because you can get those in loads of convenience stores all over the place and it's been advertised big-time in the U.S. ("Gimme a break, gimme a break...")

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Pop Shoppe is back? Holy cow. What's next? Eaton's? Dominion? Simpson's?

I drink about two bottles of pop in a given decade or so, so they won't get rich off me, but that's still kind of cool in an off-kilter way.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Well Sears tried to bring Eaton's back but it flopped. And I still have a Dominion grocery store here in Oakville. And yes, having the Pop Shoppe back is neat if for no other reason than nostalgia.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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The versions of Kit Kat bars available in the States and Canada used to be different -- Canada had the UK offering, and the US got only the milk chocolate. These days, I think the product line is the same almost worldwide.

I'm not so sure about that. I've just sent another consignment of Coffee Crisp and Kit Kats to the US and the recipients have told me that the latter tastes different than the American ones. US chocolate always seems to be (much) sweeter and (much) lower in cocoa.

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Dave

My Dad worked for the Rowntree Company for 52 years. (7 years with Macintosh which was bought out by Rowntree's). Smarties was one of their big sellers. It never came in a package like is shown. In Canada it was in a box about the size of a chocalate bar. Because I got them free, guess who was poopulair as they say in French?

Cheers

Baconburner

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