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how do you make the perfect garlic chip


origamicrane
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hello

I've been making garlic chips and I have a simple question.

I use a mandoline and make 2mm slices out of the garlic cloves and then frying in a little oil until they go crispy.

They are quite nice but sometimes they are a little bit too browned or sometimes a little oily.

But went to a food festival over the weekend and they had these perfectly dry and perfectly crispy garlic chips?

anyone know how to make them this good? i suspect they are baked but would like some cofirmation :smile:

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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I've seen them cooked at a teppanyaki counter in Japan, which would be very much like frying them. I remember them being slightly oily (not in a bad way) when they were served up.

I've cooked them at home a few times and drained them on kitchen paper to absorb any excess oil. Not having the skill of a Japanese tappenyaki chef, I did find it quite difficult to keep all of the slivers of garlic on the move and avoid some becoming too dark, so I just picked out the offending chips at the end.

I'm interested to hear that you managed to use a mandoline for slicing the garlic. I painstakingly cut the garlic into slices, so now you know why I've only made these chips a couple of times!

Edited by Corinna Dunne (log)
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I'm interested to hear that you managed to use a mandoline for slicing the garlic.  I painstakingly cut the garlic into slices, so now you know why I've only made these chips a couple of times!

very carefully :wink:

If you get the really large bulbs of garlic the cloves are about the size of a thumb so you can mandolin about 3/4 of the way down before you get scared and return to a knife. :smile:

I swear mandoline cause more injuries then any other kitchen utensil.

or you can get one of these

mini garlic slicer

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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I swear mandoline cause more injuries then any other kitchen utensil.

Second only to the cutting edge of the box of plastic wrap.

Here's how I learned to do shallot and garlic chips: thin slice. Soak in milk. Drain and blot well. Dust with salted flour. Fry. Etc.

"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office
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the mandolines, or "housewife's" as i have heard them called are great. the one i am referring to are sold at your local asian market, also called bernier slicer, still very very dangerous though.

The complexity of flavor is a token of durable appreciation. Each Time you taste it, each time it's a different story, but each time it's not so different." Paul Verlaine

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housewife's? :unsure: why they called that?

razor sharp tongue? will bleed you if you not respectful?

yep i got a large bernier its very good but cut me a few times :sad:

"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

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I'm scared of the mandoline, although I use it a lot. Always with respect though. I also have a few scars. As for the garlic chips, there are some garlic slicers in the market. You can check one of them out here. I worked with one of them and it was wonderful.

Keller has a recipe for garlic chips. He slices the garlic and then cooks it in milk three times, starting with cold milk, bringing to a boil, draining and rinsing with cold water every time. He then drins well with paper towels. He deep fries them and drains the excess oil in paper towels.

My experience, your oil shouldn't be too hot. Let them brown slowly. Take them off the oil befere they achieve the desired browness as they will keep cooking (browning). We didn't do chips, but we did sauces with browed garlic slices: a little oil in the pan, cherry tomatoes and some garlic. When the slices began to brown on the edges, we added tomato sauce and basil. It was the sauce for gnocci. For the chips, I would also take the garlic out when the edges start to brown.

EDITED to correct the link provided... by mistake I was adding the same one as Origamicrane... not very smart....

Edited by godito (log)

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:raz: I love when E-Gulleters lose their minds and start re-inventing the wheel. The best Garlic chips are not baked, boiled or fried. They are machine sliced and Dehydrated. Every seasoned chef knows that dried spices and herbs are much more flavorful, potent and more reliable than fresh. Garlic chips are readily available at a spice store or send me an email.

hello

I've been making garlic chips and I have a simple question.

I use a mandoline and make 2mm slices out of the garlic cloves and then frying in a little oil until they go crispy.

They are quite nice but sometimes they are a little bit too browned or sometimes a little oily.

But went to a food festival over the weekend and they had these perfectly dry and perfectly crispy garlic chips?

anyone know how to make them this good? i suspect they are baked but would like some cofirmation  :smile:

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:raz: I love when E-Gulleters lose their minds and start re-inventing the wheel. The best Garlic chips are not baked, boiled or fried. They are machine sliced and Dehydrated. Every seasoned chef knows that dried spices and herbs are much more flavorful, potent and more reliable than fresh. Garlic chips are readily available at a spice store or send me an email.

I am happy to re-invent the wheel, lose my mind and challenge the status quo. Guilty as charged! However, I'm not sure that frying garlic would be my best example of this. On dried garlic: I'm sorry - no offence intended as I know that this is your business - but this is one of my pet hates. I absolutely detest the stuff. I use plenty of dried spices and some dried herbs, but feel that some have more of a right to be in the store cupboard than others. Dried basil anyone?

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:raz: You are allowed to detest dried spices. I wear orange on St. Patrick's Day sometimes too. The basis for all gourmet cooking, no matter the country, is dried spices. Everyone is allowed their choice, have a lovely day..

:raz: I love when E-Gulleters lose their minds and start re-inventing the wheel. The best Garlic chips are not baked, boiled or fried. They are machine sliced and Dehydrated. Every seasoned chef knows that dried spices and herbs are much more flavorful, potent and more reliable than fresh. Garlic chips are readily available at a spice store or send me an email.

I am happy to re-invent the wheel, lose my mind and challenge the status quo. Guilty as charged! However, I'm not sure that frying garlic would be my best example of this. On dried garlic: I'm sorry - no offence intended as I know that this is your business - but this is one of my pet hates. I absolutely detest the stuff. I use plenty of dried spices and some dried herbs, but feel that some have more of a right to be in the store cupboard than others. Dried basil anyone?

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