Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Iranian Cusine


Recommended Posts

Hello, Everyone.

I was wondering if anyone had some great "starter" Iranian recipes in their personal databases that they would be willing to share with me. I really have no idea to begin, but I would love to try.

Thanks for any input.

Kelli

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A while back, I posted a few recipes with which I've had success:

Several Iranian Recipes

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jaymes recipes sound good to me. Here is my favorite Persian recipe.

Exported from MasterCook *

Khoresh Bademjan (Persian)

Recipe By : Barbara

Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00

Categories : The Main Feature

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method

-------- ------------ --------------------------------

1 pound lamb, cubed -- trim fat

1 pound eggplant -- sliced

2 tablespoons salt

1 onion -- diced

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons tomato paste

water -- as needed

salt and pepper

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon turmeric

1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

1 tomato -- sliced

2 cloves garlic -- minced

2 tablespoons finely chopped mint

Cut eggplant into quarters and then diagonally into 1/2-inch slices. Sprinkle liberally with salt and set aside. Set aside 1 tablespoon onion for garnish.

In a large skillet, cook onion in olive oil until golden brown. Add meat and brown. Cover with water and add tomato paste, turmeric, cinnamon and nutmeg. Let simmer until meat is tender.

Meanwhile, rinse eggplant and dry with paper towels. Brown slices on each side in a hot skillet sprayed with olive oil spray or a dab of oil. Lay over meat and top with tomato slices. Add salt and pepper if desired. Cover and simmer until eggplant and tomato are tender, about 10 minutes.

While meat is continuing to cook, place remaining onion in a small pan with a little olive oil and cook until soft. Add minced garlic and mint and cook 1 minute.

Turn meat mixture into a serving dish and top with onion mixture.

NOTES : Serve with steamed rice. A Spinach and Orange salad would be good with this and, for another Persian touch, yogurt with cucumbers or spinach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I posted a recipe for split-pea stew a while ago:

Khoreshteh Ghimeh

Also a simple and elegant Persian cookie:

Nan Berenji

I can be more helpful if you tell me what you are looking for (sides, entrees, light, vegetarian, etc.)

I recommend the book "Persian Cuisine: Traditional Foods" by M.R. Ghanoonparvar. The recipes are simple but good, and incorporate ingredients that are readily available in the US.

Persian Cuisine

Best of luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what do folks think about Najmieh Batmanglij's cookbooks? I've been quite happy with them, but my only comparison is to the food in Persian/Iranian restaurants, not to real home cooking...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what do folks think about Najmieh Batmanglij's cookbooks?  I've been quite happy with them, but my only comparison is to the food in Persian/Iranian restaurants, not to real home cooking...

A few years back I was learning Persian from an Iranian lady (originally from Teheran). She absolutely adored food and cooking (the topic of food came up with a most pleasing frequency in the classes :rolleyes: ). She would bring food to class - regional specialties, and breads such as nan-e-barbari that she'd baked specially for us that very morning.

She swore by Najmieh Batmanglij's books, and in fact urged us all to buy them. I would trust her opinion, as this lady was from Iran, a good cook, and a good home cook.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was younger, my friend who grew up in Iran made hamburgers with pureed onions mixed in (perhaps a variation of a Persian dish) grilled over charcoal. But he liked so much onion that the meat mixture didn't hold together all that well. So he would stoke the charcoal fire will a blowdryer :shock:. so that the patties would cook before falling apart.

He did make corn on the cob this way (he told me this was a Persian way): husk the corn and place directly on the coals, turning. Then "wash" the cooked cobs in a salt water mixture. Unusual, I thought, til I tried it. Plan on doing it again this summer with some Silver Queen white corn :wub:

Edited by bbq4meanytime (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a Persian home cook, I enjoy looking at her books, but I do not cook from them. The photographs are beautiful, and the recipes are authentic, but they are far too elaborate to be practical. I have found equally good, but far simpler recipes in other books. As an example, her recipe for rice cookies is far longer, but results in a cookie inferior to the simple recipe from Home Baking.

what do folks think about Najmieh Batmanglij's cookbooks?  I've been quite happy with them, but my only comparison is to the food in Persian/Iranian restaurants, not to real home cooking...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a Persian home cook, I enjoy looking at her books, but I do not cook from them. The photographs are beautiful, and the recipes are authentic, but they are far too elaborate to be practical. I have found equally good, but far simpler recipes in other books. As an example, her recipe for rice cookies is far longer, but results in a cookie inferior to the simple recipe from Home Baking.

thank you that's very useful to know. I love cooking from her books, but I only do so when I'm ready to dedicate a full day to the process, and really get into the zen of washing rice :biggrin:

I will look for the book you recommend above & see if I can enjoy Persian food without it being an "event"

Ooh now that I'm thinking about it, I really want some sour-cherry pulao :wub: I might have to make some this weekend...

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...