Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Korean Dining-Proper Etiquette


Recommended Posts

I love Kimbap. Big fan of the end peices. The stuff I buy or the ones I make are never as good as the ones my mom makes.

Never thought about the sesame oil but you are correct, texture of the rice is everything. It took me a few years before I figured out my mom's trick. She treats the rice in the same way as rice for sushi. The filling she makes from scratch (mostly) but I really like the suggestion about using prepare bibimbab stuff. I will give it a try.

My favorite filling (for the meat part) is actually spam. When she is short on time, thats what she uses and I think it taste great!!! And don't forget about the neon yellow pickled radish, Dakquan (sp?). Yum. I need some Kimbap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So getting back to the topic, I'm a little curious as to banchan -- is this common only during dinner, or does it appear at other times, as in for instance lunch or brunch?

And is it banchan or panchan? I've seen both but more recently banchan.

Are there other measures of respect that have been codified, you know, like in Chinese cuisine (when fish is served, the head or cheeks are usually given to the elders or head of household)?

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So getting back to the topic, I'm a little curious as to banchan -- is this common only during dinner, or does it appear at other times, as in for instance lunch or brunch?

And is it banchan or panchan?  I've seen both but more recently banchan.

Are there other measures of respect that have been codified, you know, like in Chinese cuisine (when fish is served, the head or cheeks are usually given to the elders or head of household)?

Soba

Banchan appears at all meals. The most common one is napa cabbage kimchi.

Measures of respect in Korean society are extremely codified. As for table manners, I could rattle off a whole list of things. I'll have think about how to discuss it without opening a can of worms.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would, as would many others (I'm sure) appreciate it, JY.

I'm curious about this and Korean food in general.

You'll have to forgive me. I can count the number of times I've had Korean food on one hand (liked them all though!), not to mention my lack of knowledge and experience. These were at places in Little Korea, in New York, mostly bulgogi and bbq/cook it yourself places. I've seen as few as four banchan and as many as nine or ten. I think one of them once or twice was a plate of dried, salted fish.

Come to think of it, a thread on banchan might be a good idea (if there isn't one already).

Soba

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if this is just my family, or all Korean families, but we make a big deal of making sure the eldest adult eats first. And now that I'm older, if we go out to eat somewhere where it's family style, I make sure to serve my grandparents from the plates before serving myself.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And I think since banchan is spelled with the "b" consonant in Korean, then banchan is more appropriate than panchan.

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SobaAddict,

The variety of banchan and type depends on the restuarants. I've gone to resturants that specialize in soup or noodles and have gotten few as 2. But 6 to 8 is most common. If you want a korean meal with a lot of variety, go to a larger korean resturant and order a meal (it is not a dish) called Junshik (sp?). At Woo Lea Oak in Washington DC area, it is my favorite thing to order. If I go with friends, I actually order two of these, in addition to the main course (but it can be order instead of the main corse). Junshik is usually one of the more expensive items on the menu. It will come with a lot of side dishes around 12 to 15 but if you order more than one you get more variety. I think I had Junshik in NY at the Woo Lee Oak. Also some of the larger BBQ places in NY serves them as well. There is a BBQ place right next to the holiday inn in koreatown in manhatten. I think the last time I was there I saw it on the menu. In addition to all the sides, you usually get a Geegae (stew) and a grilled fish.

As for the B or the P in Banchan, I think many of the korean sounds fall somewhere in between english sounds. But I will be the first to admit, I am expert in neither language.

I would love to know what are some of the more unusal banchans you've gotten or have made. My favorite is raw crab pickled in soy sauce.

Soup

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to know what are some of the more unusal banchans you've gotten or have made.  My favorite is raw crab pickled in soy sauce. 

The most interesting banchan I've seen has been on Guam where there are a lot of first generation Koreans who own restaurants. They have incorporated tropical fruits such as green papaya, green mango, star fruit and atis (not sure what this is in English) with excellent results.

"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...