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Dry ribs


Marlene
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My husband has a hankering for dry ribs. We've had these at various times in different restaurants but they seem to be fading from many menus.

So I'd make them for him if I could figure out how to make them. The ones I've seen have usually been cocktail size. Any ideas? Of course, if you have a recipe, consider putting it into ReceipeGullet :smile:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I'm not going to put this in RecipeGullet because I'm not 100% sure on the steps, etc.,. This is one of the Spouse's signature dishes. I've made them a few times though and here's the general description. (I would confirm but he's not home at the moment.)

1. Preheat oven to 425F (or 400 or 450? This is one of the questions I have to ask him every single time. A hot oven, at any rate.)

2. Cut your slab into individual ribs and put them on a foil-covered baking sheet.

3. Season with freshly ground pepper and garlic powder.

4. Bake for an hour (or maybe 45 minutes? no, an hour sounds more familiar.)

5. Remove from oven and put ribs in a large bowl. Season with kosher salt.

6. Serve.

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I actually did dry ribs last week, and I cooked them overnight in a very low home oven, as low as it could go, and they came out wonderful. The problem you're going to have with a hot oven, is that the connective tissue won't break down that well, and probably will be a little bit more tough. I like my ribs pulling away from teh bone, and even though that means that they are techinaclly overcooked according to competition standards, I don't care. You just need to make a rub to put on them before hand, usually something like paprika, cayenne, garlic powder, onion powder, kosher salt, black pepper, I like to add some curry powder to mine, some tomato powder if you can get it, and a little bit of brown sugar. Let them sit for about 7 hours, and then into an oven for 12-14 hours as low as you can go. I like to pull mine, let them rest, and finish them on the grill to get some charr on them. Good luck!!

Tonyy13

Owner, Big Wheel Provisions

tony_adams@mac.com

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I actually did dry ribs last week, and I cooked them overnight in a very low home oven, as low as it could go, and they came out wonderful.  The problem you're going to have with a hot oven, is that the connective tissue won't break down that well, and probably will be a little bit more tough.

These are anything but tough. No, they're not the "fall apart if you look at them" type of rib but I think they're more like what Marlene is looking for. Of course, I'm assuming that Marlene is after the type of rib that used to be available in Chinese restaurants years ago and then expanded to the "appie menus" of places.

Given Dave's response, I wonder if they aren't a Canadian phenomenon. (Or, Marlene could be talking about something entirely different... :laugh: )

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My husband has a hankering for dry ribs.  We've had these at various times in different restaurants but they seem to be fading from many menus.

So I'd make them for him if I could figure out how to make them.  The ones I've seen have usually been cocktail size.  Any ideas?  Of course, if you have a recipe, consider putting it into ReceipeGullet :smile:

I buy a lot of whole spices from Penzey's. With few exceptions, I toast them, then mix according to whatever recipe I'm using. I use a couple from fine cooking, from Bruce Aidells complete meat, and steven raichlen most often.

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I'm not going to put this in RecipeGullet because I'm not 100% sure on the steps, etc.,. This is one of the Spouse's signature dishes. I've made them a few times though and here's the general description. (I would confirm but he's not home at the moment.)

1. Preheat oven to 425F (or 400 or 450? This is one of the questions I have to ask him every single time. A hot oven, at any rate.)

2. Cut your slab into individual ribs and put them on a foil-covered baking sheet.

3. Season with freshly ground pepper and garlic powder.

4. Bake for an hour (or maybe 45 minutes? no, an hour sounds more familiar.)

5. Remove from oven and put ribs in a large bowl. Season with kosher salt.

6. Serve.

This sounds right. It must be a Canadian thing. :biggrin:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I think the only thing Canadian about this is calling them "Dry Ribs."

It's similar to what James Beard always recommended:

Salt and pepper a slab of ribs, put on a rack over a baking sheet. Roast at 350 for 45 minutes. Turn and roast another 45. Let rest about ten minutes, cut into two-rib portions and serve.

Simple as it is, it's still one of my favorite dishes, especially if I have a convection oven at my disposal.

I have to say that I don't understand why you would cut them up before roasting. Oh, wait -- maybe that's why they're called "dry."

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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I like Bruce Aidell's dry rub mix from the Complete Meat Cookbook, as well, and Raichlen's Barbeque Bible is great.

I have also rubbed, steamed up the riblets, stacked on a rack in my wok, then given them a finish in smoke. That always worked real good at breaking down the fat and melding it all together. You can wok a pigload of ribs stacking them like Lincoln logs. I also liked to mix wild plum preserves and oyster sauce to brush on them before they smoked.

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I think the only thing Canadian about this is calling them "Dry Ribs."

It's similar to what James Beard always recommended:

Salt and pepper a slab of ribs, put on a rack over a baking sheet. Roast at 350 for 45 minutes. Turn and roast another 45. Let rest about ten minutes, cut into two-rib portions and serve.

Simple as it is, it's still one of my favorite dishes, especially if I have a convection oven at my disposal.

I have to say that I don't understand why you would cut them up before roasting. Oh, wait -- maybe that's why they're called "dry."

They do cook differently when they've been cut. They end up being slightly drier than ribs cooked in a rack (in a good way though).

Also, the salt must go on after they're cooked, not before. I learned that one the hard way. If you put it on before, they really dry out and are tough.

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What may be "Canadian" about them is that these things have made it onto the appetizer menus here. I don't see these on American menus when I visit various places in the States.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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If you really want to do it right.. I would tell you to get a water smoker.. I just picked up one from home depot the other day for 40 bucks . If you have any type of backyard you can use this thing.. Its a lot of fun and you get better ribs then anything you can buy at a restaurant..

Here is some stuff i did with mine..link

Edited by Daniel (log)
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Marlene's query inspired me to take a bunch of ribs out the freezer for dinner tonight and the Spouse let me document his process to share with you all. He cooked them tonight on the grill but normally they'd be done in an 425 F oven.

First, you season the ribs:

ribs.seasoned.jpg

When he first started making these, he'd use salt, pepper, and garlic powder. Every once in a while he tries something different and, for the past little while, he's been using paprika and Montreal Steak seasoning.

After about 30 minutes or so, the ribs are turned:

ribs.grill.jpg

In total, they're cooked for 50 minutes in the oven. (This can vary wildly if you use the grill though. Tonight, they took over an hour.)

Here's what they look like close-up and personal...

ribs.closeup.jpg

When they're all done, he will move them all to one end of the pan and then prop that end up. (In other words, he drains all the fat off.) Then, they go into a bowl and are tossed with some kosher salt.

And here they are on the plate:

ribs.plated.jpg

And there they are...dry ribs!

Edited by Jensen (log)
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Hi, I'm new to eGullet. This is my first post. I love "dry" ribs ,Greek style, done on the grill.

Greek Ribs

==========

Baby Back Ribs

1 or 2 garlic cloves

dried oregano

1 lemon

salt and pepper

Mince garlic and press with back of knife to turn into a paste. (or use a

microplane)

Rub ribs with garlic, rub on oregano and salt and pepper. Squeeze juice of

whole lemon over ribs a few hours before cooking.

Note: These can be marinated earlier in the day or overnight, but do not

add the lemon until a few hours before grilling or the lemon will change the

texture of the meat.

Heat grill to high (both sides)

Place ribs on one side of grill and turn that side off. Cook, turning

occasionally until ribs are tender.

Takes between 45 minutes and one hour depending on the grill.

22906039-M.jpg

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Welcome to eGullet Ann. Greek ribs are another of my husband's favourites. Since leaving Saskatchewan, he hasn't been able to find any that compare.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Does the "dry" or Greek rib method work well with "long and slow" cooking?

YIKES! Never mind. All my questions were answered in the Baby Back Rib thread.

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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Megan, I'm not sure what others definitions of Dry ribs are but I consider dry ribs to be those cooked without BBQ sauce. I'm not a fan of sweet sauces or ketchup based sauces on ribs or wings so I do both dry. There is only one sauce that I'll use and only as a dipping sauce, never to cook with and it is the TBQ sauce from the Tunnel BBQ restaurant in Windsor, Ontario. Thankfully they ship.

Ann

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 weeks later...
I think the only thing Canadian about this is calling them "Dry Ribs."

It's similar to what James Beard always recommended:

Salt and pepper a slab of ribs, put on a rack over a baking sheet. Roast at 350 for 45 minutes. Turn and roast another 45. Let rest about ten minutes, cut into two-rib portions and serve.

Simple as it is, it's still one of my favorite dishes, especially if I have a convection oven at my disposal.

I have to say that I don't understand why you would cut them up before roasting. Oh, wait -- maybe that's why they're called "dry."

Dave, do you lower the temp or cooking time with a convection oven?

from overheard in new york:

Kid #1: Paper beats rock. BAM! Your rock is blowed up!

Kid #2: "Bam" doesn't blow up, "bam" makes it spicy. Now I got a SPICY ROCK! You can't defeat that!

--6 Train

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