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veganism in Thibodaux


bavila
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Anyone see Trading Spouses the other night? Vegan mom from San Diego trades places with Cajun (and omnivorous) mom from Thibodaux.

So what do you think? Is veganism a viable option for communities that have historically made their living (directly or indirectly) off of fisheries and fur-trapping and the like?

My thought is that ideologies such as veganism are only possible in a truly affluent society, and economic microcosms like Thibodaux would vanish if the world (or even the United States) went vegan. Of course, that's a scenario that is pretty extreme.

Bridget Avila

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I didn't see the episode. Could you give us a synopsis? What did the Thibodaux mom cook for her foster family in San Diego? Or, wasn't the rest of the family Vegan? What did the Vegan San Diego mom eat in Thibodaux? Did she try to make her foster family eat Vegan while she was there?

Also, I agree with you that extreme vegetarianism is only possible in an affluent community. But there are exceptions, like in India, where there are some Vegan sects, despite the poverty of their region.

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Actually, were one to make the decision to not eat meat, this would be a good place to do it. We have fresh vegetables year round, generally, although the selection is obviously largest in the Spring and Fall (you can grow two full on gardens here-I do it every year). THere is a wide variety of locally grown produce.

That being said, how the hell could you make that choice with all of the other stuff that we have to eat here?

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I didn't see the episode. Could you give us a synopsis? What did the Thibodaux mom cook for her foster family in San Diego? Or, wasn't the rest of the family Vegan? What did the Vegan San Diego mom eat in Thibodaux? Did she try to make her foster family eat Vegan while she was there?

Also, I agree with you that extreme vegetarianism is only possible in an affluent community. But there are exceptions, like in India, where there are some Vegan sects, despite the poverty of their region.

This was actually a rerun. If I remember correctly the plot is basically "Vegan mom goes to Louisiana for a week and cajun mom goes to El Cajon for the week. Vegan mom is portrayed as militant and hypocritical (she smokes yet tells her host kid that he will die when he's forty if he drinks pop) while cajun mom tries her best to understand the her host family".

The mom from Thibodeaux ended up cooking a vegan gumbo for her host family (the whole family was extremely vegan ). The El Cajon mom spent her time telling everyone that they were horrible and unhealthy, at one point (during a party that her host family threw to show her how cajuns get down) she made everyone watch a PETA-type video about why killing animals is immoral.

It's scary that I remember so much about that particular episode, but I remember getting really pissed off watching it (I guess FOX wins again...)

Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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I don't know, I think it might be more insidious than that.

Often the dynamics od the show seem more of a conservative/simple hardworkin' folk vs. liberal/lazy. When people with 'alternative' lifestlyles (who typically perceive themselves as open-mided, socially aware etc...) and people who they consider to be backwards get matched up, what usually happens is that the hippies/vegans/whatever get 'exposed' as being more close-minded than the supposed backwards hicks, who end up being honest, nice, hardworking folk. It is, like you noticed, a consistent message. It might not necessarily be all editing (which they undoubtebly do, and masterfully at that), but I think they choose their pairings carefully.

Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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Thanks for the synopsis, Mallet. You saw much more than I did. In fact, I think the making of the gumbo will occur in the next episode to be aired.

I'll agree with Brooks that the extensive growing season would make eating veg would be pretty simple in LA, but I'm thinking of the economic impact if everyone did go veg.

India is a good example for the lack of affluence and vegetarian living. So would agriculture then become the economic driving force for those areas?

Bridget Avila

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I didn't realize it was a two-part episode, I hope I didn't ruin it for anyone ...

With respect to your original post, bavila, I think veganism is doable regardless of your financial situation. After all, most seasonal produce is cheaper per pound than pretty much any meat and if you really want to be a vegan, you can find a way. But to echo Mayhaw Man, I doubt there is a big drive for it in a place like Louisiana. If I lived there I'd be eating frog's legs, alligator and crawfish all day too.

Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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I'm happy to hear this. That episode is indeed a two-part rerun. I saw the first part, but missed the conclusion. There actually is another thread here on eGullet from the first go-around.

The Cajun family aren't just any ol' Cajuns. They operate swamp tours. And they're involved in hunting and selling such Cajun souvenirs as alligator heads. So Vegan Mom arrives at the Canjun homestead and she's literally SURROUNDED by alligator parts drying in the sun. And when Cajun Mom shows up at militant Vegan mom's house in California, she's brought gifts for the family....alligator jaws.

I've been hoping for a rerun, so that I can see how it ends.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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So Vegan Mom arrives at the Canjun homestead and she's literally SURROUNDED by alligator parts drying in the sun.

:raz: That reminds me of my friend in Lafayette. Let's say she lives in a "transitional" neighborhood near the railroad tracks. I think she established herself well at the outset by tanning deer and rabbit hides in the carport. I think she has a reputation as some sort of witchy woman amongst her neighbors.

Anyway... perhaps I can better clarify my question about economics. While it may be possible for low-income individuals to go veg, I wonder what the vegan's answer is to entire communities who would be out of work if everyone went veg. While it might be easy to make out the "big-bad-beef-industry" as cruel and avaricious, it's much harder to paint watermen (notoriously dirt poor) the same way. I don't know what their alternative would be.

Must respond to potty-training toddler's request to use potty...

Bridget Avila

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I didn't see the episode. Could you give us a synopsis? What did the Thibodaux mom cook for her foster family in San Diego? Or, wasn't the rest of the family Vegan? What did the Vegan San Diego mom eat in Thibodaux? Did she try to make her foster family eat Vegan while she was there?

Also, I agree with you that extreme vegetarianism is only possible in an affluent community. But there are exceptions, like in India, where there are some Vegan sects, despite the poverty of their region.

This was actually a rerun. If I remember correctly the plot is basically "Vegan mom goes to Louisiana for a week and cajun mom goes to El Cajon for the week. Vegan mom is portrayed as militant and hypocritical (she smokes yet tells her host kid that he will die when he's forty if he drinks pop) while cajun mom tries her best to understand the her host family".

The mom from Thibodeaux ended up cooking a vegan gumbo for her host family (the whole family was extremely vegan ). The El Cajon mom spent her time telling everyone that they were horrible and unhealthy, at one point (during a party that her host family threw to show her how cajuns get down) she made everyone watch a PETA-type video about why killing animals is immoral.

It's scary that I remember so much about that particular episode, but I remember getting really pissed off watching it (I guess FOX wins again...)

Sure it can. nonliniar edidting gives you the ability to slice and edit on a frame level. You can make mother T look like a boob or Stalin look like happy dad if you have enough raw footage to work with.

Living hard will take its toll...
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[...]Also, I agree with you that extreme vegetarianism is only possible in an affluent community. But there are exceptions, like in India, where there are some Vegan sects, despite the poverty of their region.

See Jainism. Jainism, a very ancient religion, is still practiced by millions of people, primarily in India.

[...]Non-injury involves being strictly vegetarian. The Jain is expected to follow the principle of non-violence in all his thoughts, words and deeds. There are some Jains who wear masks over their mouths and noses to avoid any possibility of breathing in tiny insects.[...]

Bavila, I don't think you have much reason to fear that communities in Louisiana are suddenly going to become all-vegan.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Anyway... perhaps I can better clarify my question about economics.  While it may be possible for low-income individuals to go veg, I wonder what the vegan's answer is to entire communities who would be out of work if everyone went veg.  While it might be easy to make out the "big-bad-beef-industry" as cruel and avaricious, it's much harder to paint watermen (notoriously dirt poor) the same way.  I don't know what their alternative would be.

I'm pretty sure that instead of "big bad beef industry" there would be a "big-bad-eggplant industry", which would employ just as many people. For every economically ravaged community there would probably be another sprouting up around the new industry (minus the cowboys).

If the particular brand of veganism you're invisioning is more of a local/artisanal type, then I would guess that the economic impact might even be positive (note that I think it would be positive for ANY purely local/artisanal model, not restricted to veganism).

Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

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Guys,

This is a great topic. Would one of you like to split it off, say into General, and start a new topic there? It's really no longer about either the show or Thibodeaux (that's "tib-uh-dough" by the way), but it is a good topic and you might get a little better discussion going in general.

Thanks

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Sure, cher....

Veganism....Is it only for the rich?

:cool:

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I'm in Texas, and I think it's airing on Tuesday at 7pm Central. But not sure.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I'm in Texas, and I think it's airing on Tuesday at 7pm Central.  But not sure.

Yeah, well, that doesn't mean much to the rest of us. After all, Texas is a whole nother country. :wink:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I'm in Texas, and I think it's airing on Tuesday at 7pm Central.  But not sure.
Yeah, well, that doesn't mean much to the rest of us. After all, Texas is a whole nother country. :wink:

But I figgered all y'all might could be fixing to visit us. And so it'd hep all y'alls schedules to know when the show will air.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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