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Vacation bar


Dave the Cook
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Next month, I'll be hosting a family vacation. My two brothers, my mother, and various familial components will gather in a Florida house for (more or less) a week. I'm in charge of food and beverage, and I'd like to introduce the group to my new-found affection for cocktails.

Okay, it will be a re-introduction. The first cocktail I ever drank was a Harvey Wallbanger, the recipe for which my older brother brought home from his freshman year in college. My first cocktail invention was named for (and first consumed, with legendary results, by) my younger brother. My mother drank Old Fashioneds until Dad went on the wagon and we poured the booze down the drain. And my dear sister-in-law recently lamented that she had given up on Whiskey Sours because no one made them right anymore.

So I think this is a group poised for (re)discovery. The problem is, though Florida is within easy driving distance, I don't have room in the car for every possible combination of booze and equipment. I can buy liquor in Florida, of course (and I'm wondering if the reputation for cheap alcohol that Florida used to have still holds up), but I can't haul extra stuff back any more than I can haul it down.

I've been doing the cooking part of this trek for years, so I know what I'm most likely to need in that area. But this is a case of new server/new consumer. I need some help with cocktail strategies: what to take, what to make.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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For the month of July, pick up a bottle of maraschino liqueur, and prepare Floridita Daiquiri #3. White rum, maraschino liqueur, lime juice, grapefruit juice, dash of simple syrup. Delish! For the gin drinkers, that maraschino liqueur will also come in handy in Aviation cocktails (Gin, maraschino, lemon juice). For an elegant evening, prepare Dale's Ritz Coctkail---it has a "sidecar" base (cognac, cointreau, and lemon juice) with the addition of maraschino, and then topped with champagne. They'll be putty in your hands! :laugh:

Audrey

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These are great suggestions, Audrey. Given the time of year and the location, the emphasis on citrus and white liquors is well-taken.

If I add tequila to your implied list, I'm ready for daquiris and margaritas, two elegant cocktails that have been ruined by overproduction, and have probably never been tried by this crowd in their classic forms. And with the brandy, I can do Saicars, in case someone wants to test their proficiency.

To recap, I need:

gin

white rum

cognac

tequila

maraschino

Cointreau

champagne

If I double-up on the gin and rum, that's nine bottles. I figure I can take a case. So, what else?

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Florida is still home to competitive alcohol prices, compared to a lot of other states. And since you'll be looking to buy some rum, check out ABC Fine Wines and Spirits, there are about a 100 stores, probably more in Florida. While you're there, since you can't buy rhum agricole in Florida yet, look for Flor de Cana Light Dry Rum, it's aged and carbon filtered and will be a hit with almost any white rum drinker.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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If you think your family would be adventurous enough, you could add a bottle of Campari. Because it's low in alcohol, you can mix it with soda or grapefruit juice (or both) for a light, refreshing afternoon drink, then make Negronis or Jasmines during cocktail hour.

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Pisco, Amigo....Pisco. Like a bullfighter in the final act, you will simply -push- the blades through everyones shoulders with the Pisco sour!

And of course, cachaca....who doesn't enjoy the refreshment of a simple caipiriinha during the summer heat?

If you are going to double up on the gin, then get one bottle of 80 proof, and another at least 92+. And I wholeheartedly agree with Janet about Campari.

Special occasions and summer rentals are the perfect time to explore the selection of mini (50ml) bottles on your liquor store's shelves. Invaluable especially are the small-fry sized bottles of Chartreuse, Pernod, etc. A small, well-rounded selection of minis can practically "double" your bar's capacity without breaking the bank! Also pick up 375 ml bottles of vermouth.

Audrey

Charles Baker (author of The Gentleman's Companion) wrote of the "Daisy de Santiago", a recipe that he received from the offices of Facuno Bacardi----basically a daiquiri with reduced sugar, and a float of chartreuse. Splash with soda if you like. And then do it all over again, but this time, try it with gin (and go 90+ proof)...because you can.

I know we've gone over the limit, but don't forget the champagne...

Edited by Libationgoddess (log)
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If you're doing a pisco sour, Dave (and by all means, do!), then please don't shy away from the egg white. The frothy sweet/sour meringue-like delectation that results from a well-made pisco sour is unbeatable. Without the egg white, there's so much less going on. And don't be shy about using plenty of drops of Angostura on top -- there's a lot of sweet and sour to balance out with bitter!

Christopher

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Get a bottle of mezcal, some limes, and some beer. You won't be making many cocktails, but no one will complain much after the first couple of rounds. Nothing like shots and beers with your family to encourage conviviality.

Of course, this combo could also encourage many involved to air longstanding resentments (cactus products seem to bring on prickly behavior, for some reason) so you might not want to listen to me. In fact, listening to me is usually a pretty bad idea.

Carry on.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Florida is still home to competitive alcohol prices, compared to a lot of other states. And since you'll be looking to buy some rum, check out ABC Fine Wines and Spirits, there are about a 100 stores, probably more in Florida. While you're there, since you can't buy rhum agricole in Florida yet, look for Flor de Cana Light Dry Rum, it's aged and carbon filtered and will be a hit with almost any white rum drinker.

ABC seems to be mostly in the east and south of the state -- well, more accurately, everywhere but where we'll be, which is in the panhandle. I don't suppose Flor de Cana is distributed in Georgia?

If you think your family would be adventurous enough, you could add a bottle of Campari. Because it's low in alcohol, you can mix it with soda or grapefruit juice (or both) for a light, refreshing afternoon drink, then make Negronis or Jasmines during cocktail hour.

Good call, Janet. I love Campari, so if it doesn't go over well, I'll just take it home for myself.

I had to look up the Jasmine (thank you, DrinkBoy). After reading Robert Hess's decription, I had to smile. Between your grapefruit juice suggestion, the Fresca highballs they're discussing on another topic, and the Jasmine, I guess I'll have to have to get over my lifelong aversion to grapefruit. If I'm going to juice them myself (there's a lot of grapefruit in Florida), what's my best choice?

I like the idea of a low-alcohol refresher, too. One challenge this project presents is keeping the group on the cocktail track -- they'll switch over to beer faster than a Gulf-coast afternoon shower.

Pisco, Amigo....Pisco.  Like a bullfighter in the final act, you will simply -push- the blades through everyones shoulders with the Pisco sour!

And of course, cachaca....who doesn't enjoy the refreshment of a simple caipiriinha during the summer heat?

I admit having to google Pisco -- it's not what I thought it was. Cocktail DB inplies that it's hard to find. If my serach is successful, is there a brand I should be looking for?

For some reason, caipirinhas always make me think of mojitos, which I love but haven't been able to get quite right myself. Any tips?

If you are going to double up on the gin, then get one bottle of 80 proof, and another at least 92+.
Did I mention that I was new to this? It hadn't occurred to me to think about proof and gin. What do you recommend for a 92+?
Special occasions and summer rentals are the perfect time to explore the selection of mini (50ml) bottles on your liquor store's shelves.  Invaluable especially are the small-fry sized bottles of Chartreuse, Pernod, etc.  A small, well-rounded selection of minis can practically "double" your bar's capacity without breaking the bank!  Also pick up 375 ml bottles of vermouth.
A friend gave me this brilliant advice the other day. I confess to dismissing miniatures as the exclusive hallmark of airlines, cheapskates and South Carolina. Over the last few days, I've been checking out the mini selection at the stores along my commute, and mostly it's bourbons, flavored vodkas, and a rapidly expanding population of Starbuck's coffee liqueur. But I haven't hit a really good store yet -- in fact, I'm having a hell of a time just finding maraschino.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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If you're doing a pisco sour, Dave (and by all means, do!), then please don't shy away from the egg white.  The frothy sweet/sour meringue-like delectation that results from a well-made pisco sour is unbeatable.  Without the egg white, there's so much less going on.  And don't be shy about using plenty of drops of Angostura on top -- there's a lot of sweet and sour to balance out with bitter!

In for a penny, in for a pound. I promise not to stint on authenticity -- or boldness.

. . . listening to me is usually a pretty bad idea.

Noted.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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As someone who is not a cocktail expert but who is very experienced with off-site culinary projects, I would strongly suggest focusing on equipment first. You should be able to get basic spirits, mixers and fresh fruit wherever you're going. The only ingredients you should have to bring with you are the exotic ones that have to be searched for, and really your life will be fine without those. It's supposed to be a vacation. What you really need to be sure you have is the right equipment. You should have the right number of the right kind of glasses so that everybody can be served cocktails at once and you can break a glass or two and still be okay. You should have a cocktail shaker large enough to make everybody a drink at once, or if you are going to make different drinks you should have more than one shaker. You need all the necessary measures, lemon/lime juicer, etc., or making cocktails will become a real chore. Do you need a blender? When traveling, equipment is so important that you may want to consider starting with an equipment list and then working from there to see what drinks you can produce comfortably.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Pimm's is a good way to go for a refreshing beach cocktail

Also, as far as the blender goes-I don't think that I have ever had a beach rental that didn't have one. They seem to come along with the deal, just like the bad beach art on the walls.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I'm not so sure you really need to worry all that much about equipment. You can serve a cocktail in nearly any glass (as long as it isn't plastic) and no one is really going to complain. The only bit to worry about is eyeballing the volumes when you pour. You need a lemon juicer that turns the halves inside out (it can be used for limes too, and even quartered grapefruits in a pinch), a cocktail shaker, a jigger with 1 oz and 2 oz measurements and 1 and 1/2 and 3/4 oz measurements. And a blender if you want to flash blend things. A cocktail shaker can make about 4 drinks at a time. I find it a lot easier to just do that twice then deal with measuring out for 8 at once. When I don't want to bother, I make a pitcher of something instead of shaking them.

To your list of suggestions, I'd add a couple bottles of bitters (if I had to take just one, I'd take orange bitters) and some dehydrated cane juice to make really tasty simple syrup. Tom Collins are an often neglected summer cocktail that I really enjoy when made right.

I'm a serious cocktail drinker, but in the summer I turn a lot of drinks into fizzes, that is, I shake my favorite cocktail, pour it over ice, and top with soda water. I wilt in heat and this makes it so I can drink the cocktail more slowly and not get even hotter.

I've always thought Mojitos were kind of hard to screw up. I'm of the 1 lime/drink, leave a half of the squeezed lime in the drink camp. What don't you like about yours?

regards,

trillium

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...I've always thought Mojitos were kind of hard to screw up.  I'm of the 1 lime/drink, leave a half of the squeezed lime in the drink camp. ...

Well, one might think that Mojitos are idiot-proof but one would be mistaken. I attended a "Mojito party" a month or so ago hosted by a gal who considers herself an expert on the subject of Mojitos. In fact, at one point she tossed out an already muddled drink for which my pal only needed to add fizzy water simply because she hadn't made it. Oy. In her favor she had plenty o'mint and nifty chunks of actual sugar cane to be used as stirring rods (and for gnawing on after suitably stewed in hooch). Not in her favor was the use of 7-Up and ginger ale in place of fizzy water and her extremely indifferent mixological skills. I'm hardly opposed to "eyeballing" or free-pouring but this gal was really wingin' it. She also ran out of 7-Up, ginger ale and ice but that could happen to any host, I suppose... I made it through about a half a Mojito and switched to under-iced beer.

I will say, though, that she had a great spread of food available so all was not lost.

Kurt

“I like to keep a bottle of stimulant handy in case I see a snake--which I also keep handy.” ~W.C. Fields

The Handy Snake

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Vacation houses are always a gamble, equipment-wise. Brooks is right that many of them have blenders, but they're often really crappy examples. Likewise with cookware. But most of them have a surprisingly good assortment and quantity of glassware. Generally, if the house is advertised as accomodating 12 people (as this one is), it will have ample glassware for that dozen. If I lack for anything in this area, it will be for decent 4- to 5-ounce cocktail glasses. I sort of agree with trillium that most people won't care, but I will.

But the point of hashing all of this out six weeks in advance is so I can make intelligent choices about what to I need to take and what I can procure at the destination. My experiences in hunting down things like orange bitters and maraschino in a city as big as Atlanta has made me apprehensive about the availability of, say, Pisco brandy on the Redneck Riviera.

On the other hand, Targets and Wal-Marts litter the landscape. I can get glasses and blenders and lidded Rubbermaid carafes for shaking if I need them. Paper umbrellas and decent sword picks might be difficult, however.

You need a lemon juicer that turns the halves inside out (it can be used for limes too, and even quartered grapefruits in a pinch)
I've started a topic on citrus juicers here.
Tom Collins are an often neglected summer cocktail that I really enjoy when made right.
I agree. TCs are one of my favorites.
I've always thought Mojitos were kind of hard to screw up.  I'm of the 1 lime/drink, leave a half of the squeezed lime in the drink camp.  What don't you like about yours? 
Not enough mint, not enough sweet. I suspect myself of indifferent muddling.
I made it through about a half a Mojito and switched to under-iced beer.

Okay, mine aren't that bad.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Okay, let's assume for the sake of argument that equipment is not important. Let's assume that three hours of driving around Atlanta in search of some exotic bitters that are useful in making one cocktail is time well spent. Let's assume that you can just roll into any Target and acquire all your cocktail-making equipment in five minutes. Humor me anyway. Let's make an equipment list:

- Lemon/lime juicer (being discussed on the other topic)

- Lemon/lime zester

- A blender that can actually crush ice

- Two Boston cocktail shakers

- Strainer

- Measuring cups (jiggers) in various sizes

- Proper 5 oz. martini glasses

- Rocks glasses

- Ice pick or ice crusher

- Extra ice cube trays

- Muddler

- Swizzle sticks

- Straws

- Standard kitchen equipment: paring knife, small cutting board, spoons, bowls

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Dave, in what part of Atlanta do you live? I have found that either of the Tower's (Buford Highway/Doraville & Piedmont Rd/Buckhead), most of the Green's (Buford Hwy/near I-85 & Ponce in VA/Highlands), & Pearson's (smack dab in the middle of B'head) all carry an excellent assortment of "off the wall" liqueurs, &c not found in your average liquor store. I would definitely get Maraschino Liqueur, Lillet, Pisco (although this might not be a problem in Fl), Campari, & Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth before venturing out as you seldomly find in the standard neighbor hood package store. I am working to get those things carried up in Flowery Branch but it will take a while.

Several years ago we were given a burlap wine tote that we have found is ideal for travel. It was made for wine but works just as well for liquor bottles. The up sides are that it is flexible (unlike a box) and if worse comes to worst you can take the liquor out & stash it in various spots in the trunk then put it back in the bag for carrying purposes, it is easy to carry, self-contained, & the dividers help sep the bottles and keep them fr/ breaking. It also keeps all of your "supplies" in one place when you get where you are going. We are to the point where it stays filled w/ litre bottles of gin, scotch, Noilly Prat, MM, cheap champagne (for the Fuss' Sunday morning Poinsettias), & the last section has general bar supplies (shaker, acrylic tumblers, knife, bitters, &c) for grabbing when we run out of the house for an over night trip.

in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--

the best cat ever.

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Another thing that really comes in handy is a tray that can carry a bunch of glasses. This saves innumerable trips from the prep area to where the people are.

If you do decide to bring martini glasses with you, I'd suggest contacting one of the local Libbey distributors in Atlanta so you can get them by the dozen in their original packaging. The original shipping cartons should be usable for transporting the glasses conveniently and safely. Whereas, if you get them at a retail store, chances are they will be out of carton.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Okay, let's assume for the sake of argument that equipment is not important. Let's assume that three hours of driving around Atlanta in search of some exotic bitters that are useful in making one cocktail is time well spent. Let's assume that you can just roll into any Target and acquire all your cocktail-making equipment in five minutes. Humor me anyway. Let's make an equipment list:

- Lemon/lime juicer (being discussed on the other topic)

- Lemon/lime zester

- A blender that can actually crush ice

- Two Boston cocktail shakers

- Strainer

- Measuring cups (jiggers) in various sizes

- Proper 5 oz. martini glasses

- Rocks glasses

- Ice pick or ice crusher

- Extra ice cube trays

- Muddler

- Swizzle sticks

- Straws

- Standard kitchen equipment: paring knife, small cutting board, spoons, bowls

"necessity being the mother of invention" (did I just coin that phrase?)

I have found that I can make do w/ lots of stuff when I have to do so. Most places will have simple items that can do in a pinch.

juicer: if worse comes to worst you can "fork" your lemon/lime. You will not get all the juice but, hey, some times you have to "make do".

zester: hopefully the house will have some sort of grater and most of those have a zesting section. Again it is not perfect but should serve the trick

blender: noted that most beach houses have some sort of a blender. Granted the thing will not be perfect--what at a rental is?--but at some point you will have to hit a Target/K-Mart/&c so grab a cheapie blender if necessary but I would not worry about packing one.

cocktail shakers: plan to carry one & if another is necessary use a large tumbler and top it w/ a plastic cup that will fit snugly into the tumbler. Again it is not ideal but will work when necessary.

strainer: hopefully a beach house will have some sort of a seive or the strainer in the shaker will some times work and there are always fingers ":^)

jigger: some plastic and glass shakers have the measurements on the side and I have a metal shaker that has the increments on the top which is handy. Again there should be a measuring cup of some sort at the house to be used in a pinch.

glassware: I have drunk my martinis out of coffee cups when necessary so I guess it depends on how formal you wish to be. We carry acrylic (I know they are not glass but acrylic is ideal for traveling) martini & rocks glasses w/ us in our handy bag (two parts that piece together so they take up little room). Any glass can be used in a pinch but if necessary certainly you can pick them up at that trip to the store.

extra ice cube trays: now this one I will give you as I have yet to find a rental property w/ enough ice. I start making ice as soon as I get there & will freeze water in zip locks, soda bottles, or any other container and break it up when needed if necessary.

muddler/swizzle sticks: spoons work in a pinch

straws: I have never found them necessary but can be put on the "pick up list"

standard kitchen equipment: should be at the house any way

We are entertaining friends & relatives here so we can make do if necessary.

in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--

the best cat ever.

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Hey, if you want to suffer, you can also fashion a knife out of a rock. The point is, once you've spent half an hour crushing 20 limes (aka 40 lime halves) with your bare hands and extracting the amount of juice you would have gotten from a dozen limes squeezed in five minutes with a proper lever-model juicer, you'll be ready to drive all the way back to Atlanta to get the right piece of equipment.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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  extra ice cube trays: now this one I will give you as I have yet to find a rental property w/ enough ice.  I start making ice as soon as I get there & will freeze water in zip locks, soda bottles, or any other container and break it up when needed if necessary.

Or, just buy a bag or two of ice when you hit the local liquor store. :raz:

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If you like to get your ice off a big block with an ice pick, the zipper bag trick works pretty well, though the oddly curved and pointed pieces it produces can be difficult to manage -- a square container (like the disposable ones from Glad and Zip-Loc) makes more easily manipulated blocks that will sit tight on a towel while you chip away at them. If you like cubes, you can buy bagged ice, but there's something about buying ice that upsets me. It also sometimes smells bad.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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.   

Several years ago we were given a burlap wine tote that we have found is ideal for travel.  It was made for wine but works just as well for liquor bottles.  The up sides are that it is flexible (unlike a box) and if worse comes to worst you can take the liquor out & stash it in various spots in the trunk then put it back in the bag for carrying purposes, it is easy to carry, self-contained, & the dividers help sep the bottles and keep them fr/ breaking.  It also keeps all of your "supplies" in one place when you get where you are going.  We are to the point where it stays filled w/ litre bottles of gin, scotch, Noilly Prat, MM, cheap champagne (for the Fuss' Sunday morning Poinsettias), & the last section has general bar supplies (shaker, acrylic tumblers, knife, bitters, &c) for grabbing when we run out of the house for an over night trip.

We have one of these and they are simply fabulous for travel. We keep ours stocked for trips in the RV and it keeps bottles and things from rolling around the RV and it's easily portable. Get one. You won't regret it.

   glassware:  I have drunk my martinis out of coffee cups when necessary so I guess it depends on how formal you wish to be.  We carry acrylic (I know they are not glass but acrylic is ideal for traveling) martini & rocks glasses w/ us in our handy bag (two parts that piece together so they take up little room).  Any glass can be used in a pinch but if necessary certainly you can pick them up at that trip to the store.

  .

I'm sorry, but there are just some things that you gotta have. The proper glassware is essential, although acrylic is fine and that is what we use in the RV. But drinking a martini out of a coffee cup or a glass of wine out of styrofoam just doesn't do it for me. A proper glass is just part of the overall enjoyment of a good cocktail. :raz:

Just buy bags of ice. If you've got a cooler, or can delegate one or more of your family members to bring coolers, then dump the ice in there, which also has the advantage of keeping the beer nice and cool. Freezing ice cubes can take a while, and you could be left iceless when you most want some.

Also, if you are going to store ice cubes in a ziplock bag, start saving wine corks now. Putting a few of them into a bag of ice keeps the cubes from sticking together.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Also, if you are going to store ice cubes in a ziplock bag, start saving wine corks now.  Putting a few of them into a bag of ice keeps the cubes from sticking together.

If science can confirm that this works, it is surely one of the great innovations of the era.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I'm telling you it works. I've tested this with bags of ice without corks and bags with corks. Invariably, the bags of ice without corks stick together. The ones with corks do not.

Try it. Seriously.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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