Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

WTN: Mixed Bag (Some oldies but goodies...)


geo t.
 Share

Recommended Posts

Bennett Traub was back in town, and he had some spare time to spend with his Gangster bredrens, so we renewed acquaintances at a local spot with a liberal policy regarding what we could bring in and uncork. Bennett, Kim and this taster were joined by that vivacious bon vivant, Margaret Marchak, and Bill Schwab aka The Psychopomp also made a brief cameo appearance. As is usually the case with such gatherings, we got things started with a glass of white.

2002 Donna Fugata Chiarandà Sicilia DOC, 13.5% alc.: Made from not - quite - equal parts of the native Sicilian Ansonica and Chardonnay, this pale golden libation sports notes of toasty oak lending a subtle touch of butter and maple syrup over fairly rich apple and pear flaves and whiffs; Mr. Schwab added an impression of key lime meringue, while Bennett found the oak to be a little sour. The wine has a creamy texture, with undertones of minerality and just enough acidity to make it all come together nicely. A nice starter on a hot summer's evening, but you probably won't find this in stores; we were informed that it's an "on - premises (restaurant) only" selection.

Bennett brought along the following two little gems, and they were each delightful and delightfully different.

1978 Monte Vertine La Pergole Torte, 12.5% alc.: A bricked ruby red in color, this gives up a slightly funky, musty (in a good way) nose showing mostly cheese rind and a little cedar. While the flavors are predominantly secondary, there's still a solid, fairly rich core of fruit underneath it all, garnering such impressions as red currant, mushroom, forest floor, herbal, ferny and potting soil. Fully mature, and by no means over the hill, this is drinking very nicely indeed, making a fine match for a plate of carpaccio and giving testament to Mr. Traub's cellar master skills.

Imported by Diamond Wine Merchants, S. Francisco, CA

1985 Charles Joguet Chinon Cuvée du Clos de la Dioterie Vieilles Vignes, 11 - 14% alc.: There's little rust as of yet to the ruby garnet color of this 20 year old Loire Valley Cabernet Franc, and it exudes copious notes of herbs and underbrush on the nose, following through on the palate with plums and berries. As it opened in the glass, it attracted such impressions as lemon balm, lavender, savory, bay leaf, dirt and pepper. Fresh, yet fully mature, this may not be for everyone, due to its heavily herbaceous character, but it was very well received at our table, and was my favorite wine of the night. Bennett and I hooked up online because of our mutual admiration for Joguet Chinon, and I'm pleased that he carried through with his promise to bring one of these oldies, a veritable revelation for this taster.

Imported by Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant, Berkeley, CA

1993 Pogio Antico Brunello di Montalcino Reserva DOCG, 13.5% alc.: Margaret pulled this one from her bag of goodies just in time for our entrees; it's another one of those things she brought back from her travels in Italy. Showing just a hint of rust, this dark garnet is all about sticks and underbrush over deep, dark sour cherries, black cherries, licorice and earth. Lots of structure here, and while it really opens with air, giving a good idea of what's ahead, and was probably the best match for some prime, medium rare Colorado lamb chops, it's really best to leave this in the cellar for at least another 3-5 years.

1993 Fisher Sonoma Cabernet Sauvignon Wedding Vineyard, 13% alc.: From what I heard, this deep, dark garnet colored cab was rather tight when first poured, but I gave my glass half an hour to open whilst considering the previous two selections, so by the time I got to it, it was quite tasty, offering hints of cedar and tobacco over cassis and black currant, with a kiss of well - integrated oak on the nose and subtle earthy undertones on the palate. A classic Fisher cab, this is rich and sweet, without being in any way excessive, and it still has at least a few years of improvement left in it. The only thing wrong with it is that it had the disadvantage of being thrown into a mix of more complex, and dare I say, more interesting wines.

There you have it, another fine evening with great friends enjoying some delicious food with excellent wine, and isn't that what it's all about?

- from Mixed Bag

Reporting from Day-twah,

geo t.

George Heritier aka geo t.

The Gang of Pour

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That Donnafugata Chiandara is waaaay too much money for an oaky chardonnay and ansonica blend. But I'll bet GR gave it two or more bicchieri. For a far better value, and a more interesting wine, I'd steer you toward Donnafugata's Anthilla -- more ansonica, less oak. But the 2003 version is a bit fat. If you can find a 2002, you'll enjoy it.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That Donnafugata Chiandara is waaaay too much money for an oaky chardonnay and ansonica blend.  But I'll bet GR gave it two or more bicchieri.  For a far better value, and a more interesting wine, I'd steer you toward Donnafugata's Anthilla -- more ansonica, less oak.  But the 2003 version is a bit fat.  If you can find a 2002, you'll enjoy it.

Yeah, well we tried to order one of Pieropan's better Soaves, but they were all out, so the wine steward suggested this in its place. We didn't know until later that it cost $20 more than the Soave!

Having said that, while we all felt that the wine WAS overpriced after the fact, we all enjoyed whilst drinking it.

:blink:

George Heritier aka geo t.

The Gang of Pour

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Geo,

Jouget used to set the standard in Chinon; I think there is at least discussion these days as to whether that's still true. But the Clos de la Dioterie cuvee seems to never miss. I have had a few even older than the one Bennett brought and several of recent vintage; all are excellent examples of Chinon and reflective of the variations in vintage.

I don't buy much Jouget these days, but if I could find a source for this cuvee, I'd likely buy it every year (cost permitting).

Best, Jim

www.CowanCellars.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...