Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

I am curious about the addition of the jam to Andie's mustard recipe.

Is it used because of the pectin (to add body to the mustard when cooked) or because of the fruit or because of the sugar content or perhaps a combination of all three?

Also, the shelf-life on the non-canned (not processed) mustard doesn't seem to be very long whereas commercial mustards seem to last forever. Would more acid (vinegar) help to give it longer shelf life?

Thanks for this great class! I hope to tackle a couple of the recipes this weekend.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am curious about the addition of the jam to Andie's mustard recipe.

Is it used because of the pectin (to add body to the mustard when cooked) or because of the fruit or because of the sugar content or perhaps a combination of all three?

Also, the shelf-life on the non-canned (not processed) mustard doesn't seem to be very long whereas commercial mustards seem to last forever.  Would more acid (vinegar) help to give it longer shelf life?

Thanks for this great class!  I hope to tackle a couple of the recipes this weekend.

In my original master recipe I explained that I used apple jelly (mainly) because one of my friends has an allergy to honey.

You can make mustards that are not sweet but I have found that making the basic mustard with the apple jelly makes a base that combines easily with other things such as mayonnaise, sour cream and etc. When I have made it without the sweetener, it always tastes a bit "raw" to me, but that is just my taste. You might find it totally different.

The variations are endless and you can make your own "signature" mustard by adding the particular ingredients that result in a taste that you prefer.

I often add sweet chile sauce to my mustards.

I substitute cranberry sauce for the apple jelly.

It is fun to experiment and see what flavors you can develop. One of my friends adds dill pickle relish to the mustard she makes, right into the blender. She says it is perfect on Polish sausage.

As far as it lasting, I just keep it for my own use in the fridge in one of the short glass jars with the wire spring lock that holds the top on. I just keep using it until it is used up. I have never had any spoil but have had it dry out when I failed to make sure the lid was tightly sealed.

However, when I am giving out a recipe I prefer to advise people to use caution in storing homemade products.

I have found that when it is microwaved, it reaches a fairly high temperature, mainly because of the sugar in the jelly.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please talk about the difference between the yellow and black mustard seeds.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may use less if you like.  It depends on how fresh and how strong the garlic you have. 

Very fresh and sweet garlic - use more.  If the garlic is strong - use less.

I like it this way and have made a lot of it and have not had any complaints.

Thanks for the response.

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Success! Yay! Third time's the charm!

After 2 additional tries, I am now an experienced homemade mayonnaise maker!

*Takes a bow*

Another bout with the blender failed, at which point I decided I would keep doing it until A) it worked or B) I ran out of ingredients! As somebody said, it's only an egg yolk.

The third time I used room temp everything except the egg, and stirred by hand with a whisk, and the magic happened! And after 3 tries, it does feel like magic. :smile: It is a beautiful and subtle flavor and color, mostly lost on my family members, but I enjoyed it on a multi-layer sandwich last night, and will make macaroni salad with the remainder tonight.

Unless...this morning there appears to be white spots on the surface of the mayo. It's been covered in the fridge all night, and it tasted OK, but I thought I'd mention this in case I'm about to poison my family. Given no additional input, I will probably just stir it up and use it.

Next - aioli. Can't wait.


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I attempted and failed to make my first mayo last evening. It never thickened :blink: I used a chilled bowl, chilled egg yolk, and my whisk. Is there some measure of time that I can use to know if I have whisked the egg yolk long enough? It looked creamy to me, as the recipe said it should. I added other things as per instructions, and whisked 'til I dropped. Then I put the whole thin batch into my blender and blended it, until it started to smell like cooked eggs, but was still not thick! Once again, is there any indication of how long approximately this should take in the blender?

I'd like to try again tonight - any suggestions?

We had several failures before our first success. Allow me to tell you how we "discovered" what we were doing wrong.

Attempt 1: Egg was whisked in a bowl first then added to small food processor. The oil was added rather quickly (over about 1 minute) at a constant rate. It never thickened and looked quite nasty!

Attempt 2: We thought that perhaps the egg yolk was not beaten enough before the addition of oil, so the yolk was whipped for a long time first. However, we had the same result after same addition rate of the oil.

Attempt 3: Chilled all ingredients first, repeated attempt 2. Same result.

Attempt 4: At this point we thought that perhaps the food processor was mixing too aggressively, so we decided to try making it by hand in a bowl with a whisk. We added the oil extremely slowly: perhaps <1/4 tsp at a time and then whisked until it was visibly thickened. Once the thickening was started, we discovered that it was possible to add the oil much faster, perhaps as much as 1/4 cup at a time. After a short time of mixing by hand we switched to an emersion blender with a whisk attachment and had great success. I think that probably our initial conclusion that the food processor was too aggressive is incorrect, and that the addition rate of the oil is much more important.

From an ergonomics standpoint, we found that using a drinking glass and an emersion blender with the whisk attachment was the most effective way to do this. The glass was just slightly larger than the diameter of the whisk, so it was possible to churn the entire mixture easily. The speed and power of the blender seemed perfect for this task. We never really did get the food processor method to work properly, and the cleanup from this method was quite easy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lazyamerican-thanks for sharing the "if at first you don't succeed, try, try again" spotlight with me - I don't feel so alone now! Since embarking on this journey of mayonnaise, I'm thinking this may be the ideal time for me to purchase one of those stick blenders - as a matter of fact I did some online shopping this morning. Mayo is certainly possible by hand, but this looks like a really good excuse to buy another piece of equipment to me!


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
However, when I am giving out a recipe I prefer to advise people to use caution in storing homemade products.

Same here. I have always just used it up, and never had a problem, but I prefer to be cautious. In our household, everything gets eaten quickly.

Please talk about the difference between the yellow and black mustard seeds.

I haven't used black myself, but I have tried both brown and yellow, and I prefer the brown. It has a sweeter, nuttier flavor, and as my recipe has minimal processing and whole seeds, the brown seems to work better.

Success! Yay! Third time's the charm!

After 2 additional tries, I am now an experienced homemade mayonnaise maker!

*Takes a bow*

Next - aioli. Can't wait.

That's the spirit! You're a trooper!


_____________________

Mary Baker

Solid Communications

Find me on Facebook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that small amounts, as in my recipe, work best when done by hand or in a small capacity blender. The trick is to add half the oil in a very thin stream or just a little at a time. If you have a problem with pouring it too rapidly, use a syrup dispenser or honey dispenser to better control how fast you add the oil.

One of my neighbors has a prosthesis on his left arm and he has trouble pouring with precision. He has one of the honey dispensers with a pushbutton on the top and he has wound a rubberband around the shaft so the button can only be pushed down just enough to allow a very thin stream of oil to be dispensed.

If you have a food processor that has a pusher with a small central hole, such as the Cusinart has, you can pour the oil into it, keeping a finger over the opening in the bottom and use that to dispense the oil, as before, adding only half to begin with.

After you have added half the oil, continue beating until the mixture is emulsified and thick. THEN add the rest of the oil.

I have a couple of vintage mayonnaise makers which are hand operated and work very well. I will post a photo when I get home this evening. There are also hand-cranked egg beaters, the ones with a flat bottom and "whirleygig" type blades, that were made specifically for mayonnaise and sauces. They actually are very efficient. Here is one offered on ebay.

Mayonnaise maker

However, when I make larger batches, using a minimum of 4 egg yolks, I make it in the blender, keeping the speed on low.

I have made one very large batch in a Cuisinart. It turned out okay but that was a rare occurrence.

I will try a small batch in my MiniPrep if I can find it and report on my success or failure.

Don't worry about the white spots on top of the mayonnaise after it has been chilled. Just stir before using and it will again look normal.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please talk about the difference between the yellow and black mustard seeds.

Yellow or white mustard can be as hot as the black or brown.

The difference is that the black and brown have an additional pungency that adds to the overall flavor.

They can be used individually or in any combination.

Coleman's and other dry mustard available commercially are all made from "white" mustard.

The three types of mustard seeds are different sized with the black being the smallest, the brown the largest.

Last year I posted some photos in this thread.

Scroll down to post # 20.

There is a closeup photo of mustard seeds, all three varieties, freshly threshed and home grown.

If you want more information. Visit the Mustard Museum web site.Mt. Horeb Mustard Museum!

You can find all three types of whole mustard seed, at very reasonable prices, at Indian markets.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just reporting in that the white spotted mayonnaise did not kill me and my family :smile: ...in fact it was delicious in the best (and maybe the only) macaroni salad I ever made! I used a Martha Stewart recipe that includes a bit of sour cream mixed in the mayo with the other usual ingredients.


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was curious about the relatively short shelf life of the catsup (vs 3 years for canned mustard). Can you give it the canning treatment as well? How long will catsup last in this manner?


Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just reporting in that the white spotted mayonnaise did not kill me and my family

I've gotten white-spotted mayo before. If you covered it with plastic wrap and refrigerated it you probably just had some condensation (water) drip back down on your delicious mayo. That is what my white spots have been.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was curious about the relatively short shelf life of the catsup (vs 3 years for canned mustard). Can you give it the canning treatment as well? How long will catsup last in this manner?

You may can catsup, just as you would any prepared food. However because of the high acid content, catsup, and other tomato products, such as marinara sauce, etc., will not keep as long because of the possibility of corrosion of the metal lids.

I rarely keep high acid foods longer than a year.

When I make sauerkraut, for instance, I make sure that it is discarded after a year.

With my marinara sauce, I check it when it nears a year, if I have any left. Usually it gets used up fairly quickly.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday morning before work I whipped up a lovely batch of aioli - it worked on the first try. YAY! Tasted alone it was quite....garlicky (not a bad thing, but a little intense, and the kids will never eat it). Last evening I used it on a Wolfgang Puck recipe - a marinated and baked and sliced chicken breast, provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato, and red onion on a crusty roll. On the sandwich the aioli was a completely different animal, not too intense at all, just yummy. I have a leftover sandwich in the fridge today, and I can smell it every time I open the door (and this is a good thing).

I'm ready to do chipotle mayo, but I'd like some suggestions for how to serve it before I make it. I'm really sensitive to the perishableness of these recipes, especially since I am in the middle of Serv Safe training right now, so before I whip up another raw egg, I want to have my plans in place. Thanks for any suggestions anyone has.


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm ready to do chipotle mayo, but I'd like some suggestions for how to serve it before I make it.

The first thing that came to my mind when I saw the recipe for chipotle mayo was using it in potato salad, deviled eggs, egg salad sandwiches...you know, the usual suspects when it comes to mayo but the chipotle mayo would add a kick to them.

I wonder how it would go with artichoke leaves? Hmmm...

There's a baked artichoke heart-cheddar cheese dip I usually make with diced jalapeños that uses a cup of mayo. Now I am thinking it might be interesting to use the chipotle mayo in the dip.

And aren't there veggie dips made with mayo and sour cream? This spicy mayo would give them an interesting slant.


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm ready to do chipotle mayo, but I'd like some suggestions for how to serve it before I make it.

The first thing that came to my mind when I saw the recipe for chipotle mayo was using it in potato salad, deviled eggs, egg salad sandwiches...you know, the usual suspects when it comes to mayo but the chipotle mayo would add a kick to them.

I wonder how it would go with artichoke leaves? Hmmm...

There's a baked artichoke heart-cheddar cheese dip I usually make with diced jalapeños that uses a cup of mayo. Now I am thinking it might be interesting to use the chipotle mayo in the dip.

And aren't there veggie dips made with mayo and sour cream? This spicy mayo would give them an interesting slant.

Both the aioli and the chipotle mayo are great for dipping various things such as French fries, cauliflower, asparagus spears. Also cubes of various cheeses. Using a squeeze bottle, make a bunch of squiggles of the condiments on plates and place cheese cubes speared with picks on the plates. It is much neater this way than having people dip into dishes and it looks prettier.

I often make a batch for dipping little meat empanadas. Not a traditional thing, but very, very tasty.

The aioli can always be "diluted" if it is too strong. I like to mix it half and half with sour cream to top baked potatoes or fried potatoes (the "cottage" style, thin sliced and fried until crusty.)

Oh, one more thing. My housekeeper likes to roll provolone cheese with a thin slice of rye bread or pumpernickle and dip the "cigarette" (as she calls it) into the aioli or the spicy mayo.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually make the chipotle mayo for slow-roasted tenderloin sandwiches. I use sourdough buns, mustard, and the sun-dried tomato catsup, and serve them with a spicy au jus (just boxed beef broth, but with slivers of garlic and jalapeno floating in it). Quite the hit with cellar crews and winemakers during harvest days.

Then I keep using any chipotle mayo left as dips for artichokes, more sandwiches, in devilled eggs, and I've even used a spoonful as a base for a quick salad dressing.


_____________________

Mary Baker

Solid Communications

Find me on Facebook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks for all the good suggestions. I really feel sluggish about this condiment course - that Serv Safe stuff really cut into my leisure cooking time! Anyway, the course is over, (hope I passed), and I plan to do chipotle mayo tomorrow evening. I thought I'd serve it on the side of some quesadillas (chicken, cheese, maybe other stuff), a Mexican salad and Margueritas. Will report in after.


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in a backwards area of the country (I've visited more backwards areas, though).

Where can one find a reliable source for high quality brown and black mustard seeds?


I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many thanks for all the good suggestions. I really feel sluggish about this condiment course - that Serv Safe stuff really cut into my leisure cooking time! Anyway, the course is over, (hope I passed), and I plan to do chipotle mayo tomorrow evening. I thought I'd serve it on the side of some quesadillas (chicken, cheese, maybe other stuff), a Mexican salad and Margueritas. Will report in after.

You did great, Maggie! I hope your family enjoys the chipotle mayo. Let us know what they think.

I live in a backwards area of the country (I've visited more backwards areas, though).

Where can one find a reliable source for high quality brown and black mustard seeds?

Here's one: Penzey's Spices


_____________________

Mary Baker

Solid Communications

Find me on Facebook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the chipotle mayo this morning before work...and I must say, it did not taste great. Mostly just like oil with a little heat. Maybe I just don't like the oil I have, or maybe I bought some really inferior brand of chipotles in adobo (the only brand I could find, Goya, I think). I added more lemon juice, salt, pepper, and more adobo sauce, and put it in the fridge. I'm hoping the hours in the fridge help the flavors to intensify. I'm sure the Margueritas will help too! :smile:

Edited to say...Oops...Should I be spelling that Margarita?


Edited by MaggieB (log)

Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm also thinking about adding cumin or cilantro tonight if it still tastes like oil.

I was just reading the Splendid Table Weeknight Kitchen newsletter and I see that next week's recipe is Grilled Vegetable Sandwiches with - you guessed it - chipotle mayonnaise! Small world. That's one of the reasons why I am trying this Basic Condiment Course - I have never used or tasted, to my knowledge, anything other than Hellman's. Talk about having your horizons broadened!


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm also thinking about adding cumin or cilantro tonight if it still tastes like oil.

I was just reading the Splendid Table Weeknight Kitchen newsletter and I see that next week's recipe is Grilled Vegetable Sandwiches with - you guessed it - chipotle mayonnaise! Small world. That's one of the reasons why I am trying this Basic Condiment Course - I have never used or tasted, to my knowledge, anything other than Hellman's. Talk about having your horizons broadened!

Actually you can get an amazing range of flavors with the regular mayo by using a flavored vinegar or lime juice instead of the lemon juice. I meant to mention this in the intro but forgot.

The oil that you use should actually be rather neutral in flavor. An extra virgin olive oil would be too "green" or rather the taste would be too vegetal. A plain olive oil, lighter yellow in color or even a canola or other oil works much better. I sometimes use walnut oil but it has to be very, very fresh, it becomes rancid if not used soon after opening. I have also used avocado oil and grapeseed oil, both are very neutral.

When I make the spicier versions, with chipotles or other chiles, I first make the mayo using only 3/4 of the oil then blend the chiles into the remaining oil and only then do finish adding it to the mayo.

For my taste it is usually too spicy-hot to use straight so I cut it by mixing it half and half with sour cream.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Andiesenji-

I'll taste it when I get home and redo using your suggested method if I need to.


Maggie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By markovitch
      A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good.
      has anyone made their own condiments before?
      care to share experiences?
    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By sartoric
      I make this a lot. Traditionally served with dosa, but great with all kinds of Indian food, even just scooped up with bread or pappads for a snack. Although it's slightly different every time, depending on the tomatoes and chillies used, plus the strength of the tamarind, it's easy, quick to make and always delicious.
       
      In a blender - half a medium red onion chopped, 7 dried red chillies broken up a bit, 2 ripe tomatoes chopped, 1 tsp of sea salt, 3 tsp tamarind paste.

       
      Whizz until purée like about 2 minutes.

       
      In a sauté pan over medium heat add 60 ml sesame oil (gingelly), when it's hot but not smoking add 1 tsp black mustard seeds.   

       
      Quickly cover the pan to prevent escape and sizzle for a minute.

       
      Add 1 tsp of urad dal (black lentils, skinned and split they are light grey).

       
      Fry until golden, another minute or so.

       
      Throw in about 20 curry leaves. These splatter so cover the pan again. 

       
      Lower the heat and add the  blender contents.

       
      Simmer, stirring frequently for about 10 minutes, until you get a runny jam consistency.
       
      Ta da !

    • By HoneyMustard
      Pennstation's Honey Mustard taste so good, but they don't sell it in stores like Big Boy Frisch's sells their tartar sauce.

      I am assuming they buy it in bulk from a certain name brand. Does anyone know what that brand is or at least a similar Honey Mustard recipe?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...