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Cherries


cabrales
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One of my very favorite summer "starters" is cold cherry soup served in cantaloupe "bowls" with a dob of sour cream on top, and a mint leaf stuck in the sour cream.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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There's a bakery in France (or so says a French pastry chef friend of mine) where they save their cherry pits to use as pie weights. With the wicked cherry habit I have this time of year, I've decided to couch the vice in this economical virtue and start saving up my pits. The only trouble: how to get them cleaned off enough to store and use for later. Any ideas?

I'll be thinking on the original question about savory cherry dishes.

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I often use cherries (fresh in season, but more often sour dried) in the farce for a duck ballotine. The cherries lend a sweet/acid edge that can be hard to get otherwise and that goes well with the richness of the duck.

Jonathan Day

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go�t de ce qu'elles sont."

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I dunno what kind they are....but I picked up 4 pounds on Canal St this AM for just as few bucks...and there hasnt been a clinker in the bunch. Seeing as how I always loved sweet with pork...especially mostardi....which a friend in Italy's Vigili del Fuoco used to send me every year...i could see doing something in that vein.

Exactly what Id have to set my twisted lil mind into....but thats what doing a 24 hour tour at work is for.

And theres nice lychees out now too....

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Cabrales: Cherries are my favorite fruit

Several years ago I took a bunch of sour cherries, pitted them and put them in a large jar with a mason jar type top. Filled the jar with cognac and a few tbsps of sugar.

I put it on the table with a small ladle and some cookies after dinner. They are yummie. As the level goes down, I add more stuff. keep it on the sideboard, cool and dark place.

It's been going for five years now. mmmm.

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  • 4 years later...

My awesome neighbour went back home to Italy for 6 weeks a week ago, and it just so happens that this year his cherry tree was producing fruit. I now have about 4 shopping bags full of plump cherries, and seriously need some help.

I would like to make some Jam, but have absolutely no recipies for cherry jam, so if anyone could help out in that department, that would be fantastic.

Second, I was wondering what other interesting ideas you folks may have regarding what to do with all these guys...recipies would be appreciated as well.

Thanks very much,

-Justin

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Dude! Get yourself a decent basic cookbook! Something like "Joy of Cooking" or "Mastering the Art of French Cooking".....something organized along the lines of recipes according to food type.

Me, I'd can them with a tablespoon of brandy - see Fannie Farmer for canning instructions - or make cherry clafoutis - see Julia Child. Lucky you!! What riches you have!

I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

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I ran a cherry upside down cornmeal cake on a tasting menu recently. It went over very well and all the staff loved the leftovers. I think it would also be great using a regular upside down cake batter. Also to note I used Ranier cherries, but I think you could play around using sour cherries or maybe bing cherries masserated in brandy.

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Hi Justin

Lucky you. A cherry glut would be nice. I pickled some cherries during our Down Under summer and we are enjoying them now with duck breasts. I keep the opened jar in the fridge and they are just delicious. And if there's any leftover vinegar, it goes well in a salad dressing.

Here's the url for my recipe:

http://cookingdownunder.com/courses/misc/misc216.htm

Cherry clafoutis is also great. You can use this recipe, substituting cherries for plums. You might want to remove the cherry stones first. An olive pitter will do the job. Or a resident slave :-) http://cookingdownunder.com/articles/2006/226.htm

Website: http://cookingdownunder.com

Blog: http://cookingdownunder.com/blog

Twitter: @patinoz

The floggings will continue until morale improves

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Cherry season here in Southern Oregon, also... I know how you feel, although I

don't (or, perhaps I do..? ;>) envy the quantity...

How about making a nice classic for a bunch of friends? Cherries Jubilee!

Also, cherries are very nice with much game, goat, or flavorful cuts of beef.

I have less than you've got in my 'fridge right now... but they're just about perfect,

and my honest-to-goodness plan..? Well...

I'm just gonna eat 'em. :-D

-J.

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First up in quick google search for cherry preserves is a recipe using Bing.

However, I also looked up my favorite store-bought item which uses sour cherries. Contrary to Zingerman's Web site, it is NOT made exclusively with fruit and sugar.

Here's the label for American Spoon's preserves, a guide I'd trust. Lemon brings out the flavor; "Acidity rocks!" says Mario.

P.S. You can also bake a cherry galette and tell your guests, you're feeding them in the manner of Michael Pollan's final, hunter-gather's meal in Omnivore's Dilemma.

Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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Not my recipe, and I've never made it (but I've tasted it and it's delicious), but here's a recipe for cherry almond jam. The recipe was posted by an rfc friend who is a Minnesota State Fair blue ribbon winner, and if I remember correctly, this was a blue ribbon winner one year.

If you click on the link to see the entire thread, you'll also find a recipe for cherry honey relish, and cherry chipotle relish.

For straight cherry jam, she says she uses the recipe from the SureJell pack. Haven't tried it, but the jam is now part of the Gedney State Fair jam line.

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Looks great cali!

Those look almost like the cherries I picked, except a bit darker I believe...

Regarding the Jam - I was told by someone that you dont need pectin, you just use equal weight sugar and cherries and some lemon juice..

Rona, really interesting idea for the cherry almond jam, may have to try putting that in one of our Linzer Torte's

-Justin

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Looks great cali!

Rona, really interesting idea for the cherry almond jam, may have to try putting that in one of our Linzer Torte's

-Justin

I know she sometimes uses it in brownies, and people love them. I think it would be great in Linzer Torte! Or swirled in another kind of chocolate-y dessert! (I sometimes think of going to TO, just to try your tarts!)

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Looks great cali!

Rona, really interesting idea for the cherry almond jam, may have to try putting that in one of our Linzer Torte's

-Justin

I know she sometimes uses it in brownies, and people love them. I think it would be great in Linzer Torte! Or swirled in another kind of chocolate-y dessert! (I sometimes think of going to TO, just to try your tarts!)

Interesting...Cherry and chocolate...Why didnt I think about that! May have to try adding a layer of it on the bottom of the swiss chocolate fudge tart...If so, I'll save you some to sample when you get here! :raz:

PS - Made a cherry and cinnamon infused vodka...looks good so far.

Getting canning jars tomorrow and jam sometime this week.

Thx for the help all.

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How about a classic cherry pie or a cherry crisp?

If all else fails, send them to me! I have 5 pies' worth in my freezer, but there's always room for more. :biggrin:

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My recommendations:

1. Find yourself a cherry/olive pitter. I am not a kitchen gadget person, but mine has saved me hours of work.

2. I second the idea of booze. I recently put up a few quarts of cherries sotto spirito -- just empty a bottle of grappa or brandy over cherries pitted, macerated with some sugar, and packed into sterlized jars. Allow to mature for a few months, filter off the liquid as a liqueur.

3. Simmer cherries in red wine (Barolo!) with spices and sugar for a dessert sauce.

4. Epicurious has a good-looking recipe for sweet cherry and lemon conserve. Jams and conserves are really not difficult -- the original Joy of Cooking has everything you need to know about canning.

5. Crisps, crumbles, and pies.

and SAVE the PITS!! Cherry pits make a tasty grappa.

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