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molasses: what am I supposed to use?


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I have a recipe that calls for LIGHT molasses. I've done my research to know the differences between light, dark & blackstrap.

What I cannot figure out is whether the brand Grandma's "original" is the same as "light" or whether the "Robust" (less sweet that light is supposed to be) should be used. The recipe calls for 1 cup of light molasses for a ginger cake. I need to bake tomorrow.

(Friday, June 10, 2005)

Please help

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I use Brer Rabbit Full Flavored molasses for gingerbread. I think it was Cook's Illustrated that did a molasses taste-off, and this was the winner. It makes a luscious gingerbread - I used to use Grandma's, but the BR makes a much tastier cake.

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I use Brer Rabbit Full Flavored molasses for gingerbread.  I think it was Cook's Illustrated that did a molasses taste-off, and this was the winner.  It makes a luscious gingerbread - I used to use Grandma's, but the BR makes a much tastier cake.

I hate to dis "grandmas" twice in two day in the same forum, but I prefer Brer Rabbit brand too. Usually items using molasses tend to be fairly full flavored in other respects to, so I think any brand or strength would work alright in most recipes.

SB :wink:

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Its all about taste, doesnt make a difference in formula, its all about taste. You can interchange them however to suite your preference. You can even switch it out with invert sugars like trimoline, neuveline, glucose and different types of corn syrup, not including all the different kinds of simple syrups. It all depens on what your doing and what you want it to taste like. Texture is a factor, but that comes secound to me.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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As you probably know, but which I will repeat so that if you don’t know now you know; Grandma’s OG is not real molasses in that it is not a by-product of cane sugar manufacture. Molasses is made from the liquid left over after the sugar crystals have been drawn out of cane juice for making granulated sugar. However, Grandma’s is made of whole cane juice. The result is a much smoother, sweeter syrup that lacks a lot of the qualities one looks for in molasses. I think it lacks molasses flavor and has none of the bitterness that I believe is an important characteristic that is a necessary element in most applications that call for molasses.

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Does anyone know where to buy Brer Rabbit molasses or ANY product called "light molasses?" I've googled it & the only light molasses product online was for $47+ in a mass quantity that I didn't need.

As for substituting other syrups/sugars in the recipe which is not for a gingerbread, but rather a ginger-molasses CAKE, I would be fine to do that if it wasn't the first time I was making the recipe.

Please advise again.

thanks

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Wow! I learned something today. I typically use Grandma's "Robust" molasses (with the green label) when I make baked beans from scratch. But I didn't know it wasn't real molasses.

In my local Pathmark supermarket, they sell Brer Rabbit, and it's been on sale for several weeks (about 80 cents cheaper than Grandma's brand). I think I'm going to pick up a bottle and compare the two.

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hold your horses. Dont start saying grandma's molasses isnt real molasses. it is.

molasses, real molasses, is what grandma's is. It's non-extracted pure cane sugar. Meaning there is a much lower level of sucrose refined from the sugar cane. When this happens they reduce the higher purity level down to gain a thicker and darker syrup. This is what you will most likely find used in wholesale products like dark rum, not the left over products from refined sugar cain. Thats usually the molasses with less appeal I feel.

The molasses that has been "discharged" from the refining crystallized sugar is called "first molasses" or "robust". And Grandma's actually has a "robust" version and the pure veriosn (light like some of you called it).

The more you boil and refine the less sweet the molasses is going to be. But to me it starts to get off flavors that I dont even like to smell less taste.

Some molasses like Grandma's or "light" is made not because its a lesser product but thats the way some of the world feels it should be. Once again its all up to the PERSON whos using it.

just a side note. When you see sunriped sugar cane that means its flavors have matured in the sunlight slightly souring the cane sugar producing more profound flavor. Though if you ever go to the west indies and feel the need to cut and taste your of sugar cane, dont leave it in the sun too long or it will an awful sour taste.

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

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