Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Burgers/Meatloaf--Cook-Off 10


Chris Amirault
 Share

Recommended Posts

not to impose on the cook off as i have yet to get myself a digital camera but has anyone given any thought to the next one? i ask since it's only 2 days away. i'm thinking ravioli or some other kind of stuffed pasta

bork bork bork

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How about ice cream? A worldwide ice cream freeze off! You use local stuff, or not, and make fabulous ice cream related stuff-drinks, regular cream, mountainous cones, cakes, etc. Sherbert, Gelato, whatever, just as long as it involves freezing and calories.

This is a brilliant idea. I hope that all of you can see that. :wink:

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ice cream is a fantastic idea, what with the 4th of July approaching here in the states, and daytime temperatures approaching those of the sun. . .

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jeff Burgers

1lb button mushrooms sliced.

1 large onion finely diced.

4 tbl spoons unsalted butter

1 cup red wine.

1/2 lb blue cheese

1 lb lean (90-95%) ground beef

Procedure

1. brown button mushrooms in 2 tbl spoons butter

2. brown chopped onion

3. combine onion and mushrooms in saute pan pour in 1 cup red wine. Reduce until almost dry. Let cool.

4. Mix ground beef with onion/mushrooms, make 4 patties and chill for 1/2 hour.

5. saute patties to desired doness, surve on buns with crumbled blue cheese and dijion mustard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No one has yet made Leberkase, the Bavarian meatloaf, that incidently does not containe either liver or cheese. I think its the nicest form of meatloaf, with a unique texture. Might make some in the nextg few days, if anyone wants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want -- and let's remember, while we wonder why the Bavarians named their meatloaf thus, that hamburgers don't have any ham in them! I was reminded of this when I travelled in Muslim countries, where McDs sell "beef burgers."

edited to clarify -- ca

Edited by chrisamirault (log)

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No one has yet made Leberkase, the Bavarian meatloaf, that incidently does not containe either liver or cheese. I think its the nicest form of meatloaf, with a unique texture. Might make some in the nextg few days, if anyone wants.

I want. I'm not a fan of meatloaf because I usually find it very dense. (some would just say I'm dense). I'd be interested in seeing the different texture and learning about this one.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Burgers last night!

Started with 2+ pounds of chuck, hubby ground it in the Cuisinart

gallery_16100_231_298508.jpg

Simple s&p and a bit of worchestershire sauce

gallery_16100_231_236062.jpg

All patties made the same size, then into the fridge for a bit until the grill was ready (we didn't make a hole but did put a thumbprint in the middle)

gallery_16100_231_317802.jpg

served with bacon, grilled Walla Walla sweet onions, Tillamook Chedder, fried egg (we had an Aussie friend over and she said that is the way it's done so far be it for us not to embrace foreign culture! :raz: ), various condiments, Watermelon and Jicama salad on the side. Buns were brushed with melted butter and toasted on the grill.

gallery_16100_231_36470.jpg

Oh and Dayne also made potato chips, yum!! Burgers were great! We will always grind our own from here on out (that was our first time), the texture is so much nicer. They weren't as pink in the middle as I like so we'll work on the timing.

gallery_16100_231_34057.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

finally got to make the meatloaf last night & was just putting it in the oven when the phone rang & Friends dragged us off to dinner, so I tossed it in the fridge instead and baked it for lunch this afternoon.

I wanted to make a wheat-free meatloaf, so I tried this recipe, but I spiced up the sauce with some mustard powder & nutmeg (and skipped the splenda).

Here's everything laid out on the table ready to go:

gallery_20334_1438_40497.jpg

One of the reasons I picked this recipe was the prosciutto & provolone you roll up inside of it:

gallery_20334_1438_196927.jpg

Finished product:

gallery_20334_1438_318185.jpg

Here's a side view showing the mozz in the center:

gallery_20334_1438_101517.jpg

and here's a slice right before I devoured it :biggrin:

gallery_20334_1438_115518.jpg

It was a tiny bit dry I thought (one more egg maybe?) but the sauce made up for that nicely, and I liked the overall flavor very much. The prosciutto adds a nice smokiness, and of course I love the melty cheesy goodness of the provolone!

more pics can be found over in my album

edited to correct the sauce notes...

Edited by Eden (log)

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bavarian Leberkase

(No liver or cheese; Atkins friendly)

600g Pork mince (or shoulder)

200g Bacon

2 onions

2tsp salt

1/2 tsp saltpetre/Cure #1 (optional)

1/2 tsp white pepper

1 tsp dried Marjoram

1/2 tsp Nutmeg

1/2 tsp clove

2 cloves garlic (or more)

2 eggs

Grind together everything except the eggs, then add the eggs.

The original recipe said put it though the fine plate of the mincer twice, then emuslify in a food processer in small batches

gallery_7620_135_9752.jpggallery_7620_135_10798.jpg

Put a a greased loaf tin and steam for 90 minutes, then bake for 15 in ahot oven to brown the top

gallery_7620_135_3502.jpggallery_7620_135_2770.jpg

gallery_7620_135_17808.jpg

Not as successful as I would have liked. Anyone have a genuine recipe? You find good Leberkase all over Germany, and especially in Munich, where its a standard cheap lunch item. Anyone know how its made??

I think less cloves next time - my hand slipped a bit.

Its not as pink as the originals I remember, which were ham coloured - maybe more saltpetre. However the main problem is the texture which is still not fine enough, despite food processing for 10 mins. The original is more like a continuous slightly spongy texture, rather than very fine mince. I didn't mince it, just used the food processor, and maybe it does need to mince it first. Maybe also I should have used pork shoulder rather than pork mince. Also it contracted rather than exanded during steaming. Maybe not hot enough.

Edited by jackal10 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Little Miss Foodie, anyone whose pulse doesn't spike looking at that grilled bun, burger, and melty cheese stretched across has just got to turn in their burger card!

Jackal10 that's a very tasty looking meatloaf. Maybe we've been going at moist all wrong. I've been keeping my meatloaf moist for a long time by using quick grits in my meat mix, as well as sausage, as mine are usually game meats-requiring that extra fat. But maybe (as far as oven baked) a bain marie would turn out what I'd like. And done in a water smoker, same principle, more smoke flavor!!

As good as the Marlene burger looks and sounds, I am currently allowed no peanuts by my doctor, and she's bigger than me. But when I get a go-ahead, I'll be all over them like foxes in the henhouse! They look great!

Brooks, that meatloaf is downright purty :wub:

Edit to ask self: why do you not proof stuff before hitting send?

Edited by Mabelline (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bavarian Leberkase

(No liver or cheese; Atkins friendly)

600g Pork mince (or shoulder)

200g Bacon

2 onions

2tsp salt

1/2 tsp saltpetre/Cure #1 (optional)

1/2 tsp white pepper

1 tsp dried Marjoram

1/2 tsp Nutmeg

1/2 tsp clove

2 cloves garlic (or more)

2 eggs

Grind together everything except the eggs, then add the eggs.

The original recipe said put it though the fine plate of the mincer twice, then emuslify in a food processer in small batches

gallery_7620_135_9752.jpggallery_7620_135_10798.jpg

Put a a greased loaf tin and steam for 90 minutes, then bake for 15 in ahot oven to brown the top

gallery_7620_135_3502.jpggallery_7620_135_2770.jpg

gallery_7620_135_17808.jpg

Not as successful as I would have liked. Anyone have a genuine recipe? You find good Leberkase all over Germany, and especially in Munich, where its a standard cheap lunch item. Anyone know how its made??

I think less cloves next time - my hand slipped a bit.

Its not as pink as the originals I remember, which were ham coloured - maybe more saltpetre. However the main problem is the texture which is still not fine enough, despite food processing for 10 mins. The original is more like a continuous slightly spongy texture, rather than very fine mince.  I didn't mince it, just used the food processor, and maybe it does need to mince it first. Maybe also I should have used pork shoulder rather than pork mince. Also it contracted rather than exanded during steaming. Maybe not hot enough.

That looks tasty, but just for your benefit: both liver and cheese are Atkins friendly.

Hell, I have been on Atkins for almost two years, and I certainly wouldn't do any diet that denies me my organ meats and cheese...

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I've been meaning to post a note about a couple of our most recent burger meals. Then we had a hamburger for brunch today, and it prompted me.

This morning we were craving a BELT (a BLT with an fried egg on it), but didn't have any bacon in the house. So we looked in the freezer to see what we did have and there was a pack of about a half pound of ground round. We thawed it, and made hamburgers for brunch... on potato rolls with lettuce & tomato and a fried egg (and onion on mine).

gallery_13038_1496_371.jpg

This burger recipe, Napa Valley Cabernet Burgers, is one of our favorites. I'm glad I was reminded of it today, as I wanted to share the idea with you on this thread. We had them recently, only it was Sonoma wine that we used and drank, so I guess they would be called Sonoma Valley Cabernet Burgers. We also used rolls instead of foccacia.

gallery_13038_1496_77513.jpg

gallery_13038_1496_65327.jpg

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

I know this is *way* belated, but in San Diego it being 'winter' is usually not an impediment to grilling:

Burger_Separated.sized.jpg

Burger_Together.sized.jpg

The photograpy.... I'm very much of the 'point and shoot' school, best I could do being with indoor lighting and no tripod.

Also, 3/$1 avocados make guac pretty much a necessity. It's not that I don't love mushrooms, bacon, tomato and all those other 'necessary' burger fixins, but I'm not a structural engineer. I suppose the only thing I'm fairly picky about on my burgers is the cheese (Cabot 24-month aged white cheddar is my staple cheese for pretty much all sandwiches, plus it is a very reasonable $4.50/lb at Costco).

I've always been a fan of plain old salt & pepper seasoning on my burgers, but if you're feeling adventerous, I recommend marinating the ground meat in 'Basque' brand marinade for a few hours before you toss them on the grill. If you can't find it in the store, its composition is farily simple, about two parts red wine vinegar to one part nice Red like a Cab or Merlot, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, ground pepper to taste. The only thing is that this can make the meat a bit more prone to breaking up on the grill, but as long as you don't manhandle it, it should be fine.

"He's, uh, talking to the ketchup, now."

"Ketchup.... Catsup?"

"Ketchup?.... Catsup"

"Could you come along with us, sir?"

"Are you here to solve my Ketchup problem?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know there is a very large, burning hot room in Hell filled with people who eat California Burgers topped with Guacamole. At least I hope there is.

Welcome to the site!

I know avocado is the cliche "California Cuisine" addition, but if you live this far south, its ubiquity and cheapness really makes it a 'normal' food, I eat avocado slices with my scrambled eggs, for example :raz:

Burgers can be tricky, more is definitely not always better. If anyone has ever been to a Claim Jumper's Restaurant, they have something called the "Widomaker" burger, in short, 1/2 patty, 3-4 thick slices of bacon, ditto for avocado, a few slabs of cheddar, onion rings, and all the fixins. Now on the menu, you think, ok, a few onion rings, sounds like a larf. When I got this monstrosity, it was basically as it was described on the menu, except that it was more like a side of onion rings with burger topping. I had to remove at least 6 or 7 of them before I could fit it into my gaping maw. Afterwards, I felt dirty.

"He's, uh, talking to the ketchup, now."

"Ketchup.... Catsup?"

"Ketchup?.... Catsup"

"Could you come along with us, sir?"

"Are you here to solve my Ketchup problem?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know this is *way* belated, but in San Diego it being 'winter' is usually not an impediment to grilling:

'Scuse me?

Winter an impediment to grilling?

As long as you can make a clear path to the grill, what's a little sub-freezing weather?

Lack of outdoor space--now that's an impediment to grilling.

Don't get me wrong--I love my countertop grill. But it's not quite the same thing, and besides, you can't barbecue on it.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      This cook-off focuses on felafel. I've enjoyed fine felafel here in the US and overseas, but I have literally no idea how to make this, the national street food of at least a handful of Middle Eastern countries. Several people who have recommended this cook-off did so because, while they felt they had some clues, they didn't really have a consistently successful recipe or method. Sounds like a good cook-off topic, eh?
      There are a few topics on the felafel matter, including this one on tips and tricks, an older topic that finds more woes than techniques, and this preparation topic, How Do You Like Your Falafel? I also found this recipe by Joan Nathan, which seems like it might be useful.
      But what do I know? Not much, I'll tell you. Time to chime in, you!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...