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Migas in Austin


NewYorkTexan
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With all of the new Austin members, I thought I’d start a thread for favorite places for migas.  My favorite is the migas with sausage at Maudies and Las Manitas is a close second.  It is hard to find a restaurant that does not overcook the eggs.    

Where does everybody get their migas fix?

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NYT

I saw lot's of mentions of MIGAS when I was in Texas but never quite figured it out.  Could you fill me in?

Thanks.

BTW - if you have not seen my post on the General board, just loved Austin.  Probably the most chilled out town I have visited in the US.

S

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I haven't had migas in a while, but I think Magnolia cafe serves a decent plate, two versions in fact.

Next time I go to Las Manitas for lunch, I'll give their migas a try. I work downtown, so it's a ten minute walk for me...

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Simon- I thoroughly enjoyed your post.  I was amazed at how many of the high points of Austin you hit in a short period of time.  There are several descriptions of migas under Steven’s Austin thread, but in essences they are tortillas strips, peppers and onions (sometimes tomatoes) sautéed with eggs, served scrambled, covered in meted cheese.  The usual sides are beans and more tortillas.  The reason I am found of the migas at Maudies is because they use serrano peppers.  While the cheese balances the heat of the peppers, it is a true wake-up call.

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I like the migas at Magnolia and Kerbey Lane any time of day.  But now I'm all fired up to have them at Maudie's after reading the description of them.  Mmmmmm.... serranos.

I keep meaning to go to Las Manitas for them, I keep hearing that they have the best.  On the East side I hear that Juan in a Million serves a pretty plate and cheap to boot.

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what's a picadillo?

Thanks (I thought it was a small sin, but that doesn't seem to fit the context. Maybe it does if the wait is longer, though...)

Apparently it's easier still to dictate the conversation and in effect, kill the conversation.

rancho gordo

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Picadillo = pico? Picadillo is not a term I often hear, so I'm just guessing that it's short for the ubiquitous pico, which is basically a tomato and chili pepper relish that goes on nearly everything Mex.

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Actually, a picadillo is a mini-loaf of bread, sort of like a little french roll, slit open along the top and filled with a spicy meat mixture.  Cisco's is pretty famous for them. I've never had one, my dad says they are pretty good.  It's sort of a strange little item, really.

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Actually, a picadillo is a mini-loaf of bread, sort of like a little french roll, slit open along the top and filled with a spicy meat mixture.  Cisco's is pretty famous for them. I've never had one, my dad says they are pretty good.  It's sort of a strange little item, really.

Actually, the "picadillo" IS the meat mixture.  Mexicans use it to fill all sorts of things (such as chiles rellenos) or as a dip.  I've even had it over baked potatoes and it's wonderful.  There are lots of recipes for it in various authentic Mexican cookbooks.

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Trudy's, off Guadalupe ,does a good migas, and they have the poquito platter so that you don't over eat and explode.

Cisco's ...wow...I used to eat there in the mid-70's.

Maudie's migas were introduced by Jorge Arrendondo, of Casita Jorge's when he bought Maudies. Any place Jorge has opened a restaurant, the Tex-Mex is good. Anybody ever eat at Enchiladas Y Mas just off the freeway near St. David's? That was his place too. I'ts moved somewhere, I can't remember where.

God bless Texas...and Tex-Mex!

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Nah, I only explode if I forget to drink the beer that neutralizes the gas! Not a likely scenario.

I tend to regards beer as a producer rather than a neutralizer of gas.  A random sample of amber foaming bellywash recently quaffed - Harp, Negra Modelo, Kirin Ichiban, Boddingtons - seems to confirm that.  Certain foods act as a "force multiplier" - Fado's (Austin) Irish breakfast (with British baked beans) washed down with a couple of pints of Bass is a prime example.  Although nothing beats Brussels sprouts.

Back to migas.  One of my favorite Austin eateries is Fonda San Miguel - maybe the finest "interior Mexican" restaurant in the country.  The chef there - Miguel Ravago - collaborated with food writer Marilyn Tausend on a Mexican cookbook entitled "Cocina de la Familia" which has some great recipes.  I like their "Easy Migas":

2 tablespoons canola oil

½ cup chopped white onion

3 fresh serrano or jalapeño chiles, seeded and chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

6 ripe plum tomatoes, chopped

sea salt and freshly ground pepper

For the migas:

8 eggs

50 unsalted tortilla chips slightly broken up (approx 10 oz bag)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

¼ cup shredded queso añejo or Parmesan cheese

Warm the oil in a medium size skillet and sauté the onion and chiles over medium-high heat.  Add the garlic, cook for 1 minute, and add the tomatoes.  Lower the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.  Add salt and pepper to taste, and keep warm (the food, not you).

In a large bowl, beat the eggs lightly and carefully fold in the tortilla chips.

Melt the butter over medium heat in a large, heavy skillet or earthenware casserole.  Pour in the egg mixture and cook very briefly, stirring constantly, until the eggs are set but not dry.  Remove from the heat and fold in the sauce.  Taste and season more if needed.  Scatter the cheese over the top before serving.

Whole thing takes 20 minutes with practice.

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Back to migas.  One of my favorite Austin eateries is Fonda San Miguel - maybe the finest "interior Mexican" restaurant in the country.  The chef there - Miguel Ravago -

I think I read somewhere that he had left.  Does anyone know if that's true and, if so, where he went?

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what's a picadillo?

Decided that since this is a "foodie forum," I'd expound a bit on Picadillo (Peek-a-DEE-yo), in case someone out there would like to know more about it.

It is a minced meat mixture...very popular among Mexicans...  they use it to fill empanadas, meat pies, tortillas, and the most wonderful chile rellenos you ever ate.  There isn't really anything similar to Picadillo in North American cooking (at least not that I am familiar with) but I guess the closest you could come would be the hamburger filling of Stuffed Green Peppers.  However, Picadillo has no rice, is much more flavorful, and has a loose texture, like Sloppy Joe meat.

Of course, there are as many recipes for Picadillo as there are Mexican cooks, but the usual ingredients are: minced or ground meat (either beef, pork, or a combination) and the ubiquitous spicy peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic, vinegar, raisins, and nuts (almonds or pecans).

I make it often, frequently adding water chestnuts which, although obviously not Mexican, add a nice crunch.  A Mexican friend suggested it...she does, too.

I like to serve it as a dip, warmed in a chafing dish, with tortilla chips alongside.  It's always a big hit.

Every Mexican cookbook I've ever seen has at least one or two recipes for it, but it's not well-known in North America.  That's a shame....it's wonderful.

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Enchiladas Y Mas moved to Anderson Lane.  I think Ravago left Fonda San Miguel to write books.  I hate Cisco's migas (though I am aware they are renowned).  All the places listed are good but overlook the best places.

The strip on South First is fabulous, my favorite is Polvo's.

The strip on East Sixth & Seventh too, my favorite is Dario's.

Anglos can make good migas and Tex-Mex, but don't forget the places ran by Latinos.  El Rey's another good one.

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I think I read somewhere that he had left.  Does anyone know if that's true and, if so, where he went?

Ravago left in 1996 and set up in competition in the Bertram Building (what is now the Clay Pit).  When I next visited Fonda San Miguel, I asked whether they were now calling the place "Fonda sin Miguel" which I thought was excrutiatingly funny.  I didn't realize there had been a significant falling out between partners - my humor was frostily received!

Ravago has now been back at Fonda for a year or so and it's as good as ever.  The Sunday brunch is outstanding - a wide range of interior Mexican dishes arrayed on tables set in a square, with Ravago and an assistant standing in the center explaining their provenance (the dishes, that is), and serving where necessary.  I have eaten myself to a standstill on the barbecued pork, and two different chicken moles, one dark and rich with chocoloate, and one a mole verde.

About 30 green drinking coupons a head.

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When I next visited Fonda San Miguel, I asked whether they were now calling the place "Fonda sin Miguel" which I thought was excrutiatingly funny.  

Well, I'm sure it doesn't equate with wild on-the-spot laughter than one can bask in the immediate glow of, but if it is any consolation, I think it is hilarious.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I must add the best migas I have EVER had...better than the ones mentioned in y'alls recommendations (with the exception of El Rey's and Fonda San Miguel) is the Tamale House on the drag.  It's been a while, but they still may be worth checking out.

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I must add the best migas I have EVER had...better than the ones mentioned in y'alls recommendations (with the exception of El Rey's and Fonda San Miguel) is the Tamale House on the drag.  It's been a while, but they still may be worth checking out.

Thanks, Seashells...

Now, hustle yourself on over to the Austin Food Trail thread and let us know some more favorites!

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Mr. coolranch and I are planning to try Juan in a Million this weekend...will follow up with a migas report...

I like Nopalito--good migas and extra cheapy cheapy--Little Mexico isn't bad either, actually you really can't go wrong with most of the choices on that stretch of S. 1st st.

And another vote for Maudie's.

I had brunch at Fonda's about a month ago and Miguel Ravago was working the mole station.

Challah back!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello E-Gullet! first post :)

Jorge Arredondo's place is called AusTexMex and is still on 26th and I-35.

My fave enchiladas in town.. for awhile he moved around so much I felt like a stalker trying to keep up. :)

Not sure if Enchililadas Y Mas on Anderson is related to Jorge's or not.. it's pretty decent tex-mex too.

As for Migas.. Star Seeds Cafe! Around 32nd and I-35 by a dumpy old motel. Very Austin Hippy Funky w/ the best migas and pancakes in town.

IMHO :)

Tripe my guacamole baby.. just one more time.
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Hello E-Gullet!  first post :)

Hell Steebles...welcome!

Thanks for that info. We'll be looking forward to more! Maybe the Austin folks can congrate for migas y mas one of these days. Those chic New Yorkers get together all the time, as do the Brits, and we can't let them show us up, verdad? They drink a lot of beer and call it a "piss-up." We should show them that no one can piss up like us Texans!

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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