Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Egg Weight


MightyD
 Share

Recommended Posts

hi everyone,

does anyone know what the accepted general weight of eggs are? there are so many different versions - harold mcgee says 55g (17g yolk, 38g white), rees & amendola says 1.70oz which is 48.2g (15.6g yolk, 32.6g white), and i noticed that the PA&D magazine has egg conversions of 49.5g per egg (18.9g yolk, 30.6g white).

i am trying to standardize my recipes and this is proving to be very difficult esp with larger yields.

:blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have always used 50 grams (20g yolk and 30g white) for large eggs, a value I took from the Cake Bible.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, gosh when chickens are cloned and start laying the exact same sized eggs every time,

we'll have a definitive answer........

Nature varies, and the weight of eggs will always vary too.

I didn't have any conversion charts at the time, so I just decided what brand of egg I was going to buy in, and I broke a dozen eggs and weighed each one. Then I figured the average weight, and that was my egg weight for recipe conversions. Always worked just fine. The few ounces or grams you're off is virtually indiscernable in your final product.

It's important to be precise when you convert recipes, but you don't quite have to be THAT precise..... :wacko:

Relax!!! Break an egg..... :raz::raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just weigh the damned things... :biggrin:

Seriously, though, the 45-55g range is about right. Just use your best judgement, and add a bit more flour if necessary. Or beat the eggs first so that they're pourable, and add slowly until you've got the right texture (the rest becomes part of breakfast, or eggwash on another product). Of course if you haven't made this particular recipe before, the "right" texture might be difficult to guess...

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like Patrick S I use the table from the Cake Bible. It deals with large eggs and the values are very close to the values given by the PA&D. If the number of eggs is given in the recipe it is important to note if the recipe or the author uses med or large or X large eggs. If a weight is given it doesn't matter what size of eggs you are using, the weight is the weight.

Fred Rowe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...