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Cheesecakes "packages"


CurlySue
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I love the effect that Elegant Cheesecakes does on their package cakes where the fondant gets folded over on the edges to look like actual paper. My problem is that I can't for the life of me figure out how to replicate that look. It looks to me almost like they wrap the entire cake in fondant, which I wouldn't want to do, but I'd be happy to get as close to that look as possible. Anyone have any idea how I might achieve that effect? Thanks in advance for any help...

Links to the effect I'm referring to:

Pacakge 1

Package 2

Package 3

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I love the effect that Elegant Cheesecakes does on their package cakes where the fondant gets folded over on the edges to look like actual paper.  My problem is that I can't for the life of me figure out how to replicate that look.  It looks to me almost like they wrap the entire cake in fondant, which I wouldn't want to do, but I'd be happy to get as close to that look as possible.  Anyone have any idea how I might achieve that effect?  Thanks in advance for any help...

Links to the effect I'm referring to:

Pacakge 1

Package 2

Package 3

Hi CurlySue,

I'm so glad you asked this question! I've recently attempted the "wrapped corners" in rolled chocolate fondant with middling success -- my corners were close, but not at precise as I'd like. I will attempt to post a picture this evening when I'm at home. My method was to simply drape the fondant over the top of the cake and nudge/ease/fold the fondant over the ends until it vaguely resembled a package corner. I'd love to hear any other tricks for getting that clean look.

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I'm thinking that it's maybe like chocolate plastic? (chilled melted chocolate stirred with corn syrup). The sheet is made big enough to "wrap" it like you would a package.

Xander: How exactly do you make cereal?

Buffy: Ah. You put the box near the milk. I saw it on the Food Channel.

-BtVS

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I'm thinking that it's maybe like chocolate plastic? (chilled melted chocolate stirred with corn syrup).  The sheet is made big enough to "wrap" it like you would a package.

I've been trying to use chocolate plastic(clay?) lately, and am having no end of problems. It goes from being too soft to way too hard too fast. And it ... separates? Are there any tricks that might help? Any good ratios?

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I've been trying to use chocolate plastic(clay?) lately, and am having no end of problems.  It goes from being too soft to way too hard too fast.  And it ... separates? Are there any tricks that might help?  Any good ratios?

I've only worked with plastic once to be honest and it was to decorate a cheesecake :D I made marbled cheesecake that I wanted to cover in chocolate, but didn't want a ganache. I used the directions from Nick Malgieri's Chocolate book which I actually found to be pretty easy. I can type them up for you tonight if you want so you have the ratios and directions. I didn't go for square corners, but I've been able to do leaves and flowers etc with not too much problem.

BTW I do love the gift box packaging...very beautiful!

Xander: How exactly do you make cereal?

Buffy: Ah. You put the box near the milk. I saw it on the Food Channel.

-BtVS

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I love the effect that Elegant Cheesecakes does on their package cakes where the fondant gets folded over on the edges to look like actual paper.  My problem is that I can't for the life of me figure out how to replicate that look.  It looks to me almost like they wrap the entire cake in fondant, which I wouldn't want to do, but I'd be happy to get as close to that look as possible.  Anyone have any idea how I might achieve that effect?  Thanks in advance for any help...

Links to the effect I'm referring to:

Pacakge 1

Package 2

Package 3

Hi CurlySue,

I'm so glad you asked this question! I've recently attempted the "wrapped corners" in rolled chocolate fondant with middling success -- my corners were close, but not at precise as I'd like. I will attempt to post a picture this evening when I'm at home. My method was to simply drape the fondant over the top of the cake and nudge/ease/fold the fondant over the ends until it vaguely resembled a package corner. I'd love to hear any other tricks for getting that clean look.

I'd be interested in seeing your pictures Ruth, thanks. Unfortunately I have to do this cake tonight myself, so maybe I'll have some info tomorrow, after the fact. I'm thinking of doing exactly what you said you did and we'll see how it goes.

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  I can type them up for you tonight if you want so you have the ratios and directions.  I didn't go for square corners, but I've been able to do leaves and flowers etc with not too much problem.

If you don't mind, I'd appreciate it. Thanks.

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My thoughts as to how it's done, is that a bottom piece of fondant/chocolate clay has been placed on the bottom, to create the bottom flap. That piece, along with the other 3 sides have been cut into a V shape, probably before draping the fondant over the cake, so that you don't have the excess fondant folded underneath it, as you would when wrapping a present. HTH LEt us know how it goes, and what you did.

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My thoughts as to how it's done, is  that a bottom piece of fondant/chocolate clay has been placed on the bottom, to create the bottom flap. That piece, along with the other 3 sides have been cut into a V shape, probably before draping the fondant over the cake,  so that you don't have the excess fondant folded underneath it, as you would when wrapping a present. HTH LEt us know how it goes, and what you did.

I forgot about the bottom flap when I posted earlier -- I didn't even attempt a bottom flap! :blink:

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Last year, during the PastryScoop Wedding cake chats, Susan Morgan of Elegant Cheesecakes was featured. These are my notes from the chat:

uses paste color doesn't like powder b/c can't get the vibrant colors she is known for; plastique sweats, wrap airtight to minimize; uses callebaut w/corn syrup may need less syrup if humid; 8 days shelf life in fridge; use only sheeters to roll plastique, uses cookie or dough base for cheesecakes, butter in the dough releases it from pan so no parchment needed to line pan. Uses solid piece chzcake pans, if using removable, watch for water seepage.

susanmorganelegantche> sometimes no base butter cream if the cake is smooth,otherwise white chocoalte cream cheese butter cream is a good one

She repeatedly called it "paper" during the chat and said that all her formulas have been developed over the years through trial and error and encouraged the participants to do the same.

There wasn't anything on technique.

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Sorry this is late, but it looks like this may be the way to give it a try :biggrin:

Chocolate Plastic

Nick Malgieri - Chocolate

Makes about 1 1/4 lbs or enough to decorate 2 or 3 desserts, depending on their size.

2/3c light corn syrup

16 oz semisweet chocolate, melted

1 cookie sheet or jelly roll pan covered with plastic wrap

This decorating paste - similar in some of the ways it is used to marzipan- makes lovely, dramatic cake decorations. Use it as you would marzipan to wrap an entire layer or roll cake, or to fashion ruffles and ribbons for delicate decorations.

1. Use a rubber spatula to stir the corn syrup thoroughly into the chocolate. Be sure to scrape the sides of the bowl to incorporate any umixed chocolate clinging there.

2. Scrape the chocolate plastic out onto the prepared pan and spread it so that nowhere is it more than 1/3 inch thick. Draw the plastic wrap up around the chocolate to cover it completely.

3. Allow the chocolate plastic to set at a cool room temp. or in the refrigerator. IN any case, wait several hours before using it..

Variation - Sub white chocolate or milk for the semi and reduce the corn syrup to 1/2 cup.

The in goes into method for working with it to make ribbons, ruffles and cigarettes, leaves and flowers. All begin the same way.

Lightly dust work surface and chocolate with sifted cocoa powder. Divide the batch into workable pieces and pound each piece with a rolling pin to soften it and make it pliable. From here it goes into different directions for cutting, rolling etc.

I found it easier to use gloves as it kept my fingers from warming the chocolate a bit better.

I hope this helps!

jeAnne

Xander: How exactly do you make cereal?

Buffy: Ah. You put the box near the milk. I saw it on the Food Channel.

-BtVS

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CHOCOLATE WRAPPING PAPER

from Susan Morgan

Ingredients:

1 lb. Belgian White Chocolate (or your favorite import)

1/2 Corn Syrup

Food Coloring (optional)

Preparation

1. Melt Chocolate slowly. Fold corn syrup until combines. Wrap chocolate dough in plastic wrap and let it rest on counter over night. Cut chocolate dough into 3-inch cubes.

2. Soften chocolate dough in the microwave on low for 1 minute or until soft. Wear plastic gloves to kneed food coloring into chocolate dough for desired colors.

Roll out chocolate dough through pasta machine or with rolling pin to 1/8-inch thickness. Cut your favorite cake in two-inch cubes. Wrap the pieces of cake with ribbon and bows.

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gallery_32228_1335_15517.jpg

I hope this worked -- this should be a photo of my somewhat lame attempt at a package or "gift" cake (thanks for the help, JSkilling!). I've been dreaming about how to get those wonderful flaps that Elegant Cheesecake shows, and I'm beginning to think that they must wrap their cakes just as you would wrap a gift. I'm going to try that next time.

My thoughts as to how it's done, is  that a bottom piece of fondant/chocolate clay has been placed on the bottom, to create the bottom flap. That piece, along with the other 3 sides have been cut into a V shape, probably before draping the fondant over the cake,  so that you don't have the excess fondant folded underneath it, as you would when wrapping a present. HTH LEt us know how it goes, and what you did.

I forgot about the bottom flap when I posted earlier -- I didn't even attempt a bottom flap! :blink:

I managed to post a photo to my photo album using ImageGullet, but can't for the life of me figure out how to get the photo to show in my post -- the help function didn't help either. Can someone please guide me?

Thanks!

Edited by RuthWells (log)
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Go back to your image and you'll see down on the right hand side "Show actual URL" If you click on that a box will come up. Highlight all the text and copy it. Then you can edit your original post here to put in the URL for the cake photo. Click on http:// and then paste your URL in the box that comes up there. Now it's a clickable URL to get your photo in your post.

Josette

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Ruth, that looks fantastic! I think you're right... I think Elegant Cheesecakes wraps their cakes completely (bottom too). Your attempt came out way better than mine did. I think my fondant was too thick and it created a bulge under the seam on the end where yours didn't. I'm guessing the chocolate plastic can be rolled much thinner than the fondant. I'll post a pic of my attempt as soon as I download the photos from my camera.

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Ruth, that looks fantastic!  I think you're right... I think Elegant Cheesecakes wraps their cakes completely (bottom too).  Your attempt came out way better than mine did.  I think my fondant was too thick and it created a bulge under the seam on the end where yours didn't.  I'm guessing the chocolate plastic can be rolled much thinner than the fondant.  I'll post a pic of my attempt as soon as I download the photos from my camera.

Thanks, CurlySue! One trick I've been using with the chocolate fondant -- I'm rolling it out on a large Silpat and using the Silpat to transfer the fondant to the cake. Much less hair-raising than using just my hands, rolling pin, etc. I imagine this would work well for moving the chocolate "paper" as well. I can't wait to see your pix!

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Finally got my pics off my camera...

Ok, here's a shot of the side where I was trying to do the "package" effect. As you can see I failed miserably. First, I cut my fondant too narrow so I couldn't get it to reach all the way to the bottom of the cake, so the flap ends up half way down the cake (kind of like when I'm wrapping Christmas presents!). You'll also notice my problem with the huge lump of fondant that got folded under. I don't know what to do about that other than cut it before folding the top down and that seems nearly impossible since I woudn't know where to cut it until the fondant was actually on the cake and by then it's stuck already and too late. I guess chocolate plastic would work better. Anyway, here it is:

PackageCorners.jpg

Here was the final product. Not bad, but not as perfect as I was hoping for. Luckily the customer wasn't as picky as me and she loved it:

GreenPinkPackage.jpg

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i'd love it too! It looks great.

I experimented a little with the chocolate clay today... had the same issues with the bulky bits unders the folded corners... won't give up though!!

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I find it much easier to do packages with chocolate plastic then rolled fondant. The chocolate doesn't stretch very easily so you can play with it longer, lifting up your flaps to cut out the bulk. Where as the fondant wants to stretch and tear. I have to cover the whole cake, bottom and all to get the look Elegant Cheesecake gets.

But covering a whole cake in chocolate plastic isn't so edible to me as fondant.

I sort of think Elegant Cheesecakes has this down to an art and when it comes to cutting their covering, maybe they aren't starting with a square or rectangle of chocolate plastic. I'd guess that they cut the chocolate to shape, cutting out knotches for the flaped sides before they wrap the cake in it. Also......less waste that way. Don't the admit they use a sheeter to roll out their chocolate? That's another factor making it much easier for them.

CurlySue, I wouldn't say you "failed miserably" at all! It's not 'perfect' on the sides like Elegant Cheesecakes are...........but it's a dam_ nice looking cake!! I'd be thrilled to buy it or recieve it.

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What a gorgeous cake, CurlySue! Nothing to be disappointed about, there.

And I'm surprised to learn that you are the Sue of Sue-perb Creations -- I have been admiring your work on your website for a looooong time. Even wrote you an email several months ago! :wub: Nice to "see" you again.

Edited by RuthWells (log)
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Sue, you did a great job!!!  I love it!!  While the sides might not look exactly like Elegant Cheesecakes,  it is fabulous.  YOu have created your own signature style....Great job!

I agree completely, your version is beautiful, too!

Here's a suggestion for the future--take a cardboard box or piece of styrofoam the size and shape of your cake and make a paper template, folding a large piece of paper as if it were the fondant/choc plastic. Then you can see where the folds can be removed by cutting before you drape it, you can cut out the pattern and place it directly on the cake with no lumps! Better yet, if you make the same size cake all the time, you can reuse the template over and over by tracing it onto a piece of acetate, sheet vinyl (clear tablecloth material, etc) or some other reuseable material.

Edited by chefcyn (log)
It's not the destination, but the journey!
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