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torakris

Hiyayakko

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Hiyayakko is one of the most perfect foods for a hot day, it can be eaten as an appetizer, a salad, or for a light lunch it can be the whole meal.

What varieties of hiyayakko are endless, but I have noticed that many restaurants outside of Jaapn serve the most simple one with just a bit of scallions, katsuobushi and ginger and topped with soy sauce. This is good but there are so many ways to enjoy this dish.

What are some of the best hiyayakko you have eaten?

What are some of your favorite toppings when you make it at home?

Do you have a preference for a certain kind of tofu?


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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It's quite good doused with some maple syrup!

really? :shock:

Do you do this as a dessert?

Do you add anythingelse?


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Here are some pictures of hiyayakkos of the past :biggrin:

gallery_6134_91_1095290763.jpg

this tofu is topped with dashi. Dashi (not the stock) is a speciality of Yamagata Prefecture and is a combination of chopped vegetables, etc. This was a purchased product and this particular package contained:

cucumber, eggplant,konbu (kelp), scallions, myouga and shiso

gallery_6134_1003_4927.jpg

this is one of my favorites and it just screams summer :biggrin:

The okra are blanched and then minced with some ginger, the tofu is then also topped with tomatoes. I like to eat this just sprinkles with salt, but a drizzle of soy sauce or even olive oil is quite nice.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Wow, those both look amazingly good. Especially because it's 81F in my office (IN MY OFFICE) right now and cold, refreshing foods sound amazingly appealing.


Jennie

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really? :shock:

Do you do this as a dessert?

Do you add anythingelse?

I just poured maple syrup over it and ate it, nothing else was added. It was during a particularly hot summer in Kyoto, so I don't know that I would find it as tasty now as I did then. But I liked it at the time :smile: .

That being said, the brand of tofu really makes a difference in something like that. One from a small artisinal-type tofu maker--kinu-style that is especially creamy--would be best.

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might try it with some hachimitsu... or plain honey... dou-hwa (aka dofufa 豆腐花/豆花) is a kind of tofu with gingered sugar syrup, no?


"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

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might try it with some hachimitsu...  or plain honey... dou-hwa (aka dofufa 豆腐花/豆花) is a kind of tofu with gingered sugar syrup, no?

I had forgotten about this, it is a popular dessert menu item in Chinese restaurants here. You can also find prepared versions in supermarkets and mixes for making it at home. I found this site that shows how to make it at home, I just happen to have some soy milk and nigari in the fridge.... :biggrin:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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My favorite is just with shoyu.

I've also had a sort of tofu salad, with chopped tomato, green onion, canned tuna, and a dressing of shoyu and sesame oil.

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Your description of Hiyayakko reminded me of a cold tofu salad that I like. I know it isn't authentic, but it's very refreshing in hot weather. It's based on one the Too Hot Tamales made on the Food Network years ago. Is cilantro ever used in Japanese cooking?

Cold Tofu Salad

3 Tbl. rice vinegar

2 Tbl. Japanese soy sauce

1 tsp. sesame oil

1/2 to 1 Tbl. toasted sesame seeds

2 to 8 Tbl. chopped cilantro

1 Tbl. grated ginger

1 to 2 green onions, thinly sliced

1 lb. tofu, drained on paper towels (I usually cut off a piece for miso soup at another meal, and use the rest for the salad :smile:)

Combine the dressing ingredients and set aside.

Cut the tofu into 1-inch cubes and arrange on individual plates. Cover with the dressing and serve immediately.


Edited by merrybaker (log)

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Your description of Hiyayakko reminded me of a cold tofu salad that I like.  I know it isn't authentic, but it's very refreshing in hot weather.  It's based on one the Too Hot Tamales made on the Food Network years ago.  Is cilantro ever used in Japanese cooking?  It's definitely difficult to make a decent pico de gallo around these parts.

I don't know a single Japanese person who likes cilantro. Of course, I don't know the entire population of Japan, but none of those I've met seem to care for it--even those who have lived abroad in cilantro-loving places. It's quite difficult to find at grocery stores, and I remember having to go to Tokyo (from about 3 hours north) to get some.

But the recipe looks good!

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I love cold tofu. It seems so pure and clean. Until I douse it with sriracha. Then it becomes bits of creamy heaven sprinkled with hellish goodness.


Shelley: Would you like some pie?

Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

Twin Peaks

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I have had it the traditional style (katsuobushi, ginger paste and scallions, light on the soy). Another version is on top of shaved ice with a scattering of ikura, flying fish roe and finely chopped oshinko.

And then, there's always furikake.

Soba

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You have just introduced me to a new taste treat. Although I love tofu in cooked dishes, I had never tried it cold. Having some left from a dish I prepared a day ago, I cubed it and blotted it dry, topped it with a few green onions, a sprinkle of hana katsuo, a few drops of chile oil, and a little soy sauce. I love it!

Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

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Shredded (not grated) ginger and soy sauce only. My all-time favorite.

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this is actually more salad like than an actual hiya yakko but it was good anyway so I thought I would share it. :biggrin:

gallery_6134_1003_26169.jpg

mizuna and tofu with a umeboshi dressing

for the dressing I smashed up 5 small (mild flavored) umeboshi and mixed it with a bit of tubed wasabi then added a bit of rice vinegar, mirin, soy sauce and canola oil.

A wonderfully refreshing dish.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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That looks wonderful, Torakris! I'll have to try that.

One of my favourite hiyayakko variations is mentaiko. Usually mashed up with some sesame seeds, negi, sesame oil and soy sauce.


Edited by smallworld (log)

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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On Saturday I went to the Chinese grocery store, where they sell freshly-made tofu. It was pretty warm outside so when I got home I decided to eat my first hiyayakko of the season. I used soy sauce, bonito, and sesame seeds. The taste of the fresh tofu is really much better than what I buy at the grocery store.

131547841_355e6883e4_o.jpg


Jennie

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Hiyayakko is wonderful with abaechu kimchi juices around a block of fresh silken tofu and topped with some green cabbage leaves.

Simple. Delicious.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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My favorite will always be cold silken tofu with soy sauce. So refreshing.

About a week ago, I experimented and had ceviche with my tofu. Very yummy.


the tall drink of water...

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I finally gave this dish a try. I have to admit when I first read the thread cold tofu didn't sound to appetizing but, YUM!!! OMG! YUM! I ended up finishing the whole block of tofu (yes I'm a glutton) it was so good. For my first time I wanted to try something simple so it was just silky tofu with minced green onion with soy sauce. I have a feeling I'll be eating this all summer. Any other recipes I should try?

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I finally gave this dish a try. I have to admit when I first read the thread cold tofu didn't sound to appetizing but, YUM!!! OMG! YUM! I ended up finishing the whole block of tofu (yes I'm a glutton) it was so good. For my first time I wanted to try something simple so it was just silky tofu with minced green onion with soy sauce. I have a feeling I'll be eating this all summer. Any other recipes I should try?

Two of my favorite lunches are hiyayakko (usually with slivered cucumbers--because I always seem to have them in the house) topped with either Thai style sweet chili sauce or a garlic oil mixed with some ponzu (or just the garlic oil alone). Both of these are even better with a handful of cilantro tossed in and the second is great with some chopped tomatoes as well.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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