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Dailey

Cake Fillings That DON'T Need Refrigeration?

11 posts in this topic

i'm looking for some new and delicious cake fillings that don't need to be refrigerated. i don't have alot of space in my refrigerator/freezer, and i would like to be able to leave out my decorated cakes for a 2/3 days room temp.

does anyone have a cake filling that they would like to share? one of my favorites is RBL's sour cream ganache, it can be left out for 3 days! :biggrin: thanks!

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hello,

I am looking for the same thing...i am trying to come up with a recipe for small wedding cakes that will be the guest's take-home favour. I will also be a bridesmaid and don't have alot of fridge space, so ideally the cakes could be finished the day before and sit a room temp in their boxes.

I have been considering ganache, would you mind sharing your sour cream recipe?

My friend doesn't want a fruitcake, and it's been hard coming up with a cake to be unfilled, good enough to be on its own. I found a recipe for a milk-chocolate almond cake with very little flour (almonds are ground) which has fresh dates inside. Would this classify as a filling? Otherwise I've been thinking about using a soaking syrup instead of a filling.

Sorry to answer your question with more questions...

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The Mousseline Buttercream recipe in The Cake Bible says it can be left at room temp for 2 days. I use that a lot, mixed with different fruit fillings, and it's very nice. The regular ganache recipe (in the Cake Bible) also can be left at room temp for 3 days.

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The Mousseline Buttercream recipe in The Cake Bible says it can be left at room temp for 2 days. I use that a lot,  mixed with different fruit fillings,  and it's very nice. The regular ganache recipe (in the Cake Bible) also can be left at room temp for 3 days.

I use the mousseline recipe exclusively when I need to do a wedding cake..and it holds up extremely well. It's light & goes on incredibly smooth. There is also a Honey Buttercream in the Cake Bible that I used with her almond cake recipe & some apricot preserves. I left that out at room temp over night & into the next day as I also couldn't fit it in my fridge. It turned out great.

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I usually dont stress about leaving cream cheese icing out for a couple of days... unless it's high summer (but hey, I live in Scotland, lol)


Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

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If using fresh cream (especially ultra pasteurized) there should be no problem leaving ganache filled cakes out at room temp for a few days.

poached fruits - like pears in wine shoujld be fine. I like pears poached in red wine with a ginger infused ganache

Buttercream (italian meringue) is fine

fruit compote fillings or gelled filling are good

you can do a plain milk chocolate ganache, cherries, and vanilla buttercream (sort of black forest)

stay away from whole egg mixtures, custards, pastry cream, curds

With the small cakes - if you box them up so they are stackable you can fit a hundred even in a fairly tight space - or even use a styrofoam cooler chest with an ice pack or two if that gives you the latitude you need to make a tasty cake that people will like.

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thanks for the suggestions, and assurance that buttercream can be left at room temperature. i know it is cooked by the syrup, but i guess i am a bit over cautious when dairy is involved. i'll write again when i have results...

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butter is fine at room temp for days and days

its the eggs that are the least safe or stable

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thanks everyone! :biggrin: i forgot to ask, does anyone know about SMBC? i've heard it can stay out from 4 hours, all the way to 2 weeks! :wacko: anyone know for sure?

also, here is the recipe for sour cream ganache, very easy. 12 ounces of bittersweet chocolate and 14 ounces of sour cream. in a double boiler set over hot water or in micowave on high, stirring every 10 seconds, melt the chocolate. remove from heat and add sour cream, stir with a rubber spatula until uniform in color. if the pan feels warm, transfer to a bowl. use at once or store, and when ready to use soften by placing the bowl inn a water bath or microwave for a few seconds. :biggrin:

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The Mousseline Buttercream recipe in The Cake Bible says it can be left at room temp for 2 days. I use that a lot,  mixed with different fruit fillings,  and it's very nice. The regular ganache recipe (in the Cake Bible) also can be left at room temp for 3 days.

I use the mousseline recipe exclusively when I need to do a wedding cake..and it holds up extremely well. It's light & goes on incredibly smooth. There is also a Honey Buttercream in the Cake Bible that I used with her almond cake recipe & some apricot preserves. I left that out at room temp over night & into the next day as I also couldn't fit it in my fridge. It turned out great.

Joshalow and Sugarbuzz:

When you make the Mousseline Buttercream, do you add the amount of liqueur she lists? It seems like quite a lot of liquid to add and might make the buttercream too soft. I've always cut it in half.

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Joshalow and Sugarbuzz:

When you make the Mousseline Buttercream, do you add the amount of liqueur she lists? It seems like quite a lot of liquid to add and might make the buttercream too soft. I've always cut it in half.

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