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Blue crab "mustard", which is actually the crab's hepatopancreas . . .

. . . a gland made up of very small branched tubes (ramified tubules) located on both sides of the mid-gut in the main body cavity directly under the top shell and functions as both liver and pancreas. It is involved in producing digestive enzymes and is responsible for filtering impurities from the crab's blood.

From blue crab info - click and scroll for more.

I have heard natives resort to trickery to entice non-natives to try this delicious treat. "Um, yeah, they injected mustard under each crab's shell. Try it!" :rolleyes: Mrs. C, a midwesterner, tried crab mustard without hesitation - one of the many reasons I knew she was special. :wub:

Edited to subdue a stray parenthesis.

Edited by C. sapidus (log)
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You'd have to be born in East London to enjoy:

...

Smoked haddock

Why? Smoked haddock's remarkably inoffensive, unlike jellied eels (which not even a lot of Londoners like). Plus, it's not at all London-specific, since most of it's produced in Scotland or further north in England.
"Tea and cake or death! Tea and cake or death! Little Red Cookbook! Little Red Cookbook!" --Eddie Izzard
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I agree, smoked haddock actually is not bad. I certainly prefer smoked salmon, but haddock is not exactly unenjoyable.

At the age of six I wanted to be a cook. At seven I wanted to be Napoleon. And my ambition has been growing steadily ever since. ‐ Salvador Dali

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Surprised this wasn't mentioned, but a dozen or so hot STEAMED crabs, piled high with Ol' Bay, and a "Natie Boe" - from good old Balmer...........

oh my, just might have to go order a couple of dozen today...............

and or softies, fried simply, with a bit of flour, on a piece of white bread.

Only in Maryland............ :biggrin:

AMEN :wink:

"look real nice...............wrapped up twice"

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Do they still make National Bohemian beer?

Ever since McCormick & Co. acquired its maker, you can find Old Bay just about anywhere. However, the McCormick people did remain respectful to Old Bay's roots -- you can still find a "Maryland -- With Pride" logo on every can, featuring that wonderful state flag of Maryland's. (The logo does not appear on any other McCormick product, even though the company is still headquartered in metropolitan Baltimore.)

Old Bay is wonderful. You can use it on so much more than seafood.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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My mother-in-law was born and raised in Buffalo and is of Polish descent. She makes a yeast bread called placzek that my husband and his family loves. It is very dry and doesn't have a lot of flavor. I'm guessing it's something you need to be raised on.

In Buffalo, they also sell a Polish sausage that is not smoked or cured. It is boiled for ages and has kind of a soft texture. I think it's awful. I can barely stand the smell. Again, I think it might be something you have to be raised on.

I made ugali, a kind of mush that's the national dish of Kenya, when my kids were studying Africa. We had an African themed meal for a bunch of families. Unanimous thumbs-down to the ugali. Apparently the Kenyan marathon runners claim that ugali is their secret weapon -- it's no wonder it hasn't spread to other runners.

And for the record, while the Garbage Plate is unique to Rochester, it's not something you have to be from the area to enjoy. All the proof you need is the hoards of college students at Nick Tahou's on any weekend night.

Oh yeah, someone mentioned perch. If it's the fish I know, they are small lake fish but they are my all-time favorite fish. I'd be shocked if they were counted among the foods only a native could love.

Edited by Dieck (log)

My blog: Rah Cha Chow

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Blue crab "mustard", which is actually the crab's hepatopancreas . . .
. . . a gland made up of very small branched tubes (ramified tubules) located on both sides of the mid-gut in the main body cavity directly under the top shell and functions as both liver and pancreas. It is involved in producing digestive enzymes and is responsible for filtering impurities from the crab's blood.

From blue crab info - click and scroll for more.

I have heard natives resort to trickery to entice non-natives to try this delicious treat. "Um, yeah, they injected mustard under each crab's shell. Try it!" :rolleyes: Mrs. C, a midwesterner, tried crab mustard without hesitation - one of the many reasons I knew she was special. :wub:

Edited to subdue a stray parenthesis.

OH GOD i love crab mustard. this sounds nasty, but I LOVE to spread it like butter on slices of sourdough bread. I also love crab eggs as well and they taste great on toast.

to add to this thread, ponhaus, puddin, hog maw, and scrapple. All delicious pork by products brought to us by those talented amish. I love ponhaus for breakfast with lots of maple syrup :wub:

BEARS, BEETS, BATTLESTAR GALACTICA
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Filipino bagoong. (I notice there are other Flips participating here). Bagoong is the lees left over from making fish sauce (patis in the Philippines).

Flips use it like anchovies in many dishes. I like to make a dip (essentially Filipino bagna cauda) for tart unripe mangoes by frying bagoong and garlic (and sometime hot pepper) together. Yum!(?)

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrimp_paste

Edited by fmed (log)

fmed

de gustibus non est disputandum

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I like bagoong with chunks of roasted eggplant mixed chopped tomatoes and onion. Great side dish and makes one eat heartier with lotsa rice and fish/meat.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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not completely sure if this qualifies but Tony Packo's hotdogs. Think M*A*S*H when Jamie Farr ( Toledo native) would wear a Mud Hens jersey and speak dreamily of Tony Packos. yea thats us! There is nothing that says Toledo (well there are many other things like that Jeep Liberty you're driving.) like Tony Packos hotdogs, sauce and peppers.

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