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You had to be (born) there


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Pig's ears.

Agreed. Don't know where ya had to be born to like them, but wherever that is, I know I definitely wasn't born there. The texture is horrible.

Brazil, I guess; they're part of feijoada.

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I can't really describe the taste of Vernor's... it's more "intense" than something like Schweppes, but not in a super-spicy ginger beer way. It just tastes "different." I've never had another ginger ale that tastes like it.

It reminds me of a cross between ginger ale and cream soda.

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While we're back on soda:

I was watching the latest episode of the History Channel's delightful documentary series "American Eats" last night. Soda was the topic.

Apparently, at some point during the Second World War, Moxie was the most popular soft drink in America--outselling even Coca-Cola.

This I find astounding.

The beverage was also promoted as being healthful, as it is derived from a root that was used for medicinal purposes when the soda was invented.

This I can believe, for it sure tasted like medicine.

And, of course, the documentary noted that "moxie" entered the language as a noun meaning "great courage or determination." How we got from the soda to that usage remains a mystery.

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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You have to be born a Norwegian to love lutefisk.

Having a great deal of glogg to drink beforehand and shots of aquavit afterwards goes a long way towards softening one's feelings towards lutefisk :biggrin:.

Marcia.

Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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Surprised this wasn't mentioned, but a dozen or so hot STEAMED crabs, piled high with Ol' Bay, and a "Natie Boe" - from good old Balmer...........

oh my, just might have to go order a couple of dozen today...............

and or softies, fried simply, with a bit of flour, on a piece of white bread.

Only in Maryland............ :biggrin:

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Surprised this wasn't mentioned, but a dozen or so hot STEAMED crabs, piled high with Ol' Bay, and a "Natie Boe" - from good old Balmer...........

oh my, just might have to go order a couple of dozen today...............

and or softies, fried simply, with a bit of flour, on a piece of white bread.

Only in Maryland............ :biggrin:

You're talking nectar of the gods here! I don't think you have to be born on the East Coast to love this!!!

:smile:

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  • 1 year later...
I've never met a cheese I didn't love.  Until I tried Fromage Fort.  It's all of the crusts and old cheeses thrown into a pot with some eau de vie, and left to ferment for three months or so.

I know this thread is old, but I was searching around for a thread that talked about fromage fort, and found this one.

Actually, I've met plenty of cheeses that I don't like, but fromage fort is not one of them. I find it, or at least the incarnations that I tried in Lyon during the year that I was there, to be delicious. At the time I wasn't aware of how it is made, but now that I have learned, it doesn't turn me off. In fact, the whole idea of creating something more complexly flavored than the single cheeses themselves fascinates me. In fact, I just finished making a small batch of fromage fort from a Pepin recipe:

1/2 lb of cheese scraps

1/4 cup white wine (it took a bit more for the texture to be right)

1 garlic clove

pepper

herbs

salt if needed (probably not)

I don't know how long I'll be fermenting it, but probably not anywhere close to 3 months.

I used:

brillat savarin frais

reblochon

pico picandine

gruyere

raclette

I understand that often the cheeses used are longer-aged and therefore drier, but gruyere is the driest and most aged cheese that I have at the moment.

Anyway, just thought that I'd share.

Best,

Alan

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Here in Hoboken we love our mozzarella. A local deli makes hot roast beef subs with "mutz" and gravy Thursdays and Saturdays and people line up down the block for it. Out of towners always think it sounds gross...that is, until they try it.

In case roast beef and mutz fails to turn you off, how about tuna salad and mutz? corned beef and mutz, with mustard? Those are Friday's and Tuesday's special sandwiches, respectively.

Guess what- they're delicious.

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Maybe this is so close to scrapple it doesn't count, but...

Livermush! As near as I can tell, this isn't even really a southern thing, maybe just southern Appalachians, or the Carolinas. Similar to scrapple, with a less varied ingredient list (iirc)

I never could figure why the college guys from up north would happily chomp down sausage and hotdogs and gag at livermush... :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
Here in Hoboken we love our mozzarella.  A local deli makes hot roast beef subs with "mutz" and gravy Thursdays and Saturdays and people line up down the block for it.  Out of towners always think it sounds gross...that is, until they try it.

In case roast beef and mutz fails to turn you off, how about tuna salad and mutz?  corned beef and mutz, with mustard?  Those are Friday's and Tuesday's special sandwiches, respectively.

Guess what- they're delicious.

People really think that's gross? Sounds like a regular ole sandwich to me...that's coming from a Philadelphian though :biggrin:

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People really think that's gross?  Sounds like a regular ole sandwich to me...that's coming from a Philadelphian though  :biggrin:

A:[...] in a Philadelphia, no matter what you ask for, you can’t get it. You ask for something, they're not gonna get it. You want to do something, it ain't gonna get done. You want to go somewhere, you can't get there from here.

M: Good God. So this is very serious.

A: Just remember, Marcus. This is a condition named for the town that invented the cheese steak. Something that nobody in his right mind would willingly ask for.

-- From "The Philadelphia" by David Ives (collected in All in the Timing) :raz:

Edited by Chris Hennes (log)

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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People really think that's gross?  Sounds like a regular ole sandwich to me...that's coming from a Philadelphian though  :biggrin:

A:[...] in a Philadelphia, no matter what you ask for, you can’t get it. You ask for something, they're not gonna get it. You want to do something, it ain't gonna get done. You want to go somewhere, you can't get there from here.

M: Good God. So this is very serious.

A: Just remember, Marcus. This is a condition named for the town that invented the cheese steak. Something that nobody in his right mind would willingly ask for.

-- From "The Philadelphia" by David Ives (collected in All in the Timing) :raz:

:laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:

Edited to add this bit from a review of All in the Timing, in which the reviewer explains the inversion that is a Philadelphia and how the character who finds himself in it learns to cope through reverse psychology:

As Mark learns, you can get service in a diner with a simple, "Hey waitress, fuck you!"

Yep. Philadelphia through and through.

Edited by MarketStEl (log)

Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen

My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

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I don't know any non-South African who will eat UltraMel. It's marketed as "custard" and looks like melted Velveeta. It's vanilla and you can pour it over anything sweet.

I'm also a huge Marmite fan. It's been fed to me since I was a toddler. But I can't get anyone else to like it!

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Otherwise...  I think haggis is tops on the list, but closely followed by fur seal.  You definitely need to be Aleut to enjoy fur seal. :blink:

Haggis is just blood pudding.

No, it isn't. Haggis is sheeps heart, lungs and liver, mixed with oats and boiled in the sheeps' stomach.

Perhaps you are confusing it with black pudding.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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