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where is this palace of french fries exactly? i've always wanted to taste poutine and now you say they are right there,  right there in river city!

will be visiting parents in sacto fairly soon and need to try the poutine. any precautions i should take? is eating them in the afternoon a good idea? i don't forsee much alcohol intake in sacto for me, its a family visiting time and we ain't drinkers.

It's in Old Sac on Second Street and is called "The Spud Shack". They do substitute shredded mozzarella for the cheese curd but the flavour is pretty close to being the same. In fact, the fellow told me that they do the same in their restaurant in Ontario and have no complaints about it.

As Lexy said, a heart defibrillator and/or nitroglycerine tabs are optional. At the very least, someone in your party should know CPR.

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where is this palace of french fries exactly? i've always wanted to taste poutine and now you say they are right there,  right there in river city!

will be visiting parents in sacto fairly soon and need to try the poutine. any precautions i should take? is eating them in the afternoon a good idea? i don't forsee much alcohol intake in sacto for me, its a family visiting time and we ain't drinkers.

It's in Old Sac on Second Street and is called "The Spud Shack". They do substitute shredded mozzarella for the cheese curd but the flavour is pretty close to being the same. In fact, the fellow told me that they do the same in their restaurant in Ontario and have no complaints about it.

As Lexy said, a heart defibrillator and/or nitroglycerine tabs are optional. At the very least, someone in your party should know CPR.

\

One word:

Scrapple!

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Poutine is just one of the late night munchies where I come from (N. Ireland). Except we don't call it that and over here it is chips peas and gravy. Another one is chips, fried rice and currry sauce all in one big gloop. Delicious, but only after the pubs are closed. Chips and Mayonaise also. I'm sure thare are more, they'll come to me.

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It's in Old Sac on Second Street and is called "The Spud Shack".

wow, i grew up in a pawn shop on second street, before it was called old sac (when it was still called skid row).

have you ever noticed the french fry machine (by idaho potatoes) at the train station just across the freeway from old sac? i always look at it longingly, but its never working when i have the time....the idea of a vending maching that fries potatoes is quite exciting.

thanks for this important info! I love having a mission when i go to sacto.

marlena

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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have you ever noticed the french fry machine (by idaho potatoes) at the train station just across the freeway from old sac? i always look at it longingly, but its never working when i have the time....the idea of a vending maching that fries potatoes is quite exciting.

Now where was that last time I was in the train station in Sac? I guess I'm always trying to soak up as much sunshine as I can before I get on the train back to the fog in SF and not thinking about french fries.

"I just hate health food"--Julia Child

Jennifer Garner

buttercream pastries

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Here in New Zealand some foods to be wary of include..Kanga wai ( rotten corn), muttonbirds in oil, and rotten crayfish. :biggrin: The corn and crayfish are put into flax type bags and left in running water ( stream or river) until rotted. These are some traditional Maori foods but I dont believe the young ones will keep that particular tradition going for much longer. :wink:

To be honest, you will not find these on a menu at any restaurant, but I suggest having a VERY heavy cold if you come across them elsewhere. It will impair smell and taste, a good thing believe me!

I have eaten, no...tasted, the kanga wai with cream and sugar. Never again will I be so adventurous. It was prepared by the Matron of the hospital I worked at and I do recall many of the maternity ward patients threatening to leave if it was heated on the premises again!

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have you ever noticed the french fry machine (by idaho potatoes) at the train station just across the freeway from old sac? i always look at it longingly, but its never working when i have the time....the idea of a vending maching that fries potatoes is quite exciting.

Photo please.

Actually, photo demanded! :wink:

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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have you ever noticed the french fry machine (by idaho potatoes) at the train station just across the freeway from old sac? i always look at it longingly, but its never working when i have the time....the idea of a vending maching that fries potatoes is quite exciting.

Photo please.

Actually, photo demanded! :wink:

its gorgeous and has the logo of idaho potatoes on it, the colours of the machine front are orange/russet/brown as they should be. it looks like a magic box of potatoes that is ever-ready to fry up some nice fat french fries whenever you want them!

except that i've never been able to. I am actually frightened that the machine is going to dissappear before i've had the opportunity to put in my coins and watch/taste it in action.

for a photo.....stay tuned. i don't have a digital camera but know that i need one asap. i've just got fear of purchasing the right one. should be sorted out by the time i next reach sacto in the next month or so......

marlena

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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Having travelled to nearly 60 countries and tried some pretty

odd food, the oddest I ever tasted was right here at home in

B.C. What was it? A barnacle. Yep, a barnacle. At the Wick in Tofino, of all

places. Actually, it wasn't bad; tasted kinda like a clam.

Actually, now that I think of it, I did try whale blubber in Greenland.

Slightly fishy, chewed on it forever before discreetly spitting it out.

Like swallowing at thick wad of bubblegum, so I didn't.

As for salted licorice, yes!!!, love it!!! And, Chocoholic, if you know

of places in Vancouver to get it, do tell. I used to get it from the little chocolate

shop on Commercial and Venables, but the proprietor said she

might not be able to get it in anymore for some strange reason.

I haven't been to the place in New West for a while, so hoping they

still sell it. In fact, I haven't had a double zout fix in ages!!!!

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  • 1 year later...
I don't know anyone who's acquired a taste for Marmite or Vegemite as an adult, having grown up without exposure to it.  But that's an easy one.

Coming from the east coast, I'd say that the glory of fish 'n' brewis eludes most "come from aways."  Salt cod, poached hardtack, rendered pork fat, and maybe some raw onion and a drizzle of vinegar.  Cod cheeks and tongues won't usually have outsiders slavering, either.  Present company probably excepted.

I first tasted Marmite when I was 23, and it was love at first bite. More than 30 years later, I still love it and am thankful that in recent years it has become a bit easier to get it in the US. I love Bovril too. Either one on a baguette well-slathered with butter! My lasst trip to England was n 2001, and I discovered Twiglets. Ahh, marmite-flavored snack stick heaven!

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I've never met a cheese I didn't love.  Until I tried Fromage Fort.  It's all of the crusts and old cheeses thrown into a pot with some eau de vie, and left to ferment for three months or so.

The only cheese that I have ever found inedible is Norwegian Gjetost. Nasty!

I was 20 and in college when I met gjetost. I had a Norwegian-heritage roommate who introduced it to me. I liked it then and still do decades later, although it is a bit hard to find where I live.

Gjetost has a dense texture, a light-brown toast color that is unusual for cheese, and a taste reminischent of peanut butter, but milder. What's not to like? :-)

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Stinky Tofu

Durian

Spicy fermented bean curd

Bitter melon

Thousand-year-old egg

All Asian foods. My DNA is pure WASP and I tasted all of those things after age 40. I like them all and willingly buy them in Chinese markets.

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Here's one that's close to home for a lot of egulleters: Root beer.

Every non-American I know, including myself, bought this in either the spirit of scientific enquiry or culinary curiosity, or by mistake - thinking it might be something palatable. This was not a mistake any of us ever repeated. And the idea of a root beer float... What a waste of icecream!

Yes! Root beer is foul - tastes like toothpaste to me. :wacko:

Perhaps you have tasted a bad brand. There are very bad brands out there. There are also very good ones. Try Stewart's with the orange-sriped labels. Lovely!

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Having travelled to nearly 60 countries and tried some pretty

odd food, the oddest I ever tasted was right here at home in

B.C. What was it? A barnacle. Yep, a barnacle. At the Wick in Tofino, of all

places.  Actually, it wasn't bad; tasted kinda like a clam.

Actually, now that I think of it, I did try whale blubber in Greenland.

Slightly fishy, chewed on it forever before discreetly spitting it out.

Like swallowing at thick wad of bubblegum, so I didn't.

As for salted licorice, yes!!!, love it!!! And, Chocoholic, if you know

of places in Vancouver to get it, do tell. I used to get it from the little chocolate

shop on Commercial and Venables, but the proprietor said she

might not be able to get it in anymore for some strange reason.

I haven't been to the place in New West for a while, so hoping they

still sell it. In fact, I haven't had a double zout fix in ages!!!!

Barnacles are well loved in spain, too! And I think they are delicious.

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How about Ukrainian salo? Ukrainians believe nobody who is not Ukrainian can lilke it. Salo is like bacon, but not smoked. it is sliced thicker and not cooked before eating. I first visited Ukraine and tasted salo after age 50. Ukrainians were surprised and pleased that I liked it.

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I think I'd have to submit dilis as a candidate.  Tiny dried anchovies, usually served dipped in vineger with chilis and crushed garlic.  I'm forbidden to either pan-fry or oven crisp these in the house, so I cook them outdoors using the barbecue's gas grill.  He still swears that I'll kill every bird and small animal in a 5-mile radius with the smell.  :blink:

Bearing that in mind, my Canadian-born/half-Filipino preschooler loves them.  Eats them like chips.  And tries unsuccessfully to get Daddy to try them.  Here's where a parent's food training comes back to bite you in the ass:  "Daddy, you always say that we have to try everything at the table once.  Come on Daddy, you'll think they're great!"  :laugh:

I do that too.

For the Durian haters, it's not Asian. It's South Asian. I've met many a North Asian who thinks it's disgusting.

May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Moxie. If you're a northern New Englander, especially Mainiac, it's the soda equivalent of Campari. Otherwise, it would taste like something you'd use to take the rust out of your car radiator. Mmmm....

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I think I'd have to submit dilis as a candidate.  Tiny dried anchovies, usually served dipped in vineger with chilis and crushed garlic.  I'm forbidden to either pan-fry or oven crisp these in the house, so I cook them outdoors using the barbecue's gas grill.  He still swears that I'll kill every bird and small animal in a 5-mile radius with the smell.   :blink:

Bearing that in mind, my Canadian-born/half-Filipino preschooler loves them.  Eats them like chips.  And tries unsuccessfully to get Daddy to try them.  Here's where a parent's food training comes back to bite you in the ass:  "Daddy, you always say that we have to try everything at the table once.  Come on Daddy, you'll think they're great!"   :laugh:

I do that too.

For the Durian haters, it's not Asian. It's South Asian. I've met many a North Asian who thinks it's disgusting.

ermmm - Durian is South East Asian

(= the swath from Burma/Myanmar through Thailand, Malaysia,

Indonesia etc.).

Durian's non-smelly cousin jackfruit is South Asian

(=the Indian subcontinent - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka,

Nepal, Maldives, etc.) Jackfruit can be cooked unripe (called kathal

sort of artichokey but more starch), or eaten ripe or made

into desserty things. The unripe version has no smell. The ripe

has a mild - medium smell.

Jackfruit:

Scientific name: Artocarpus heterophyllus

Wikipedia link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackfruit

Durian:

Scientific name: Durio ... (there are several varieties each Durio something)

Wiki link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durian

Milagai

ps: what countries does the term "North Asian" include?

Edited by Milagai (log)
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As far as I'm concerned, Chicago-style deep dish pizza.

I don't like, I'm tired of trying to like it, and I wish they wouldn't call it pizza.

You know what? I'm so glad someone else finally said this. I've gone my whole life listening to people go on and on about how FABULOUS Chicago pizza is, and every time I've tried it's been... blech! Too thick and oozy and chewy. Gimme crispy wood-fired thin crust any day!

I used to hate red-bean flavored Chinese desserts, but I've eaten them enough times that now I ADORE them! Mmmm! Sweet pasty red bean goodness!

I don't understand why people don't like okra, but I guess it really is one of those things you have to have grown up eating.

And this thread is the first I've heard of people not liking root beer or root beer floats. Interesting.

I've tried many times to appreciate gefiltefish, but I just can't. Oh, I'll eat it if it's served to me, and I'll make polite noises, but the likelihood of my getting seconds is nil. I just don't get why anyone would grind up perfectly good fish and form it into weird little balls and poach it.

-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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Maybe mentioned upthread, but most non-desis

(desi = South Asian term for South Asian) can't

hack pickles.....

Maybe some very adventurous person will like

the sweeter milder kinds, but not the really

hardcore stuff (e.g. lemon pickle or whole little raw mangoes).

Or maybe now the new popularity of Moroccan pickled

lemons (pretty similar to the desi kind) may create a new

wave....

Milagai

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