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History of Lavosh in Hawaii


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I know we have some forum readers who know a lot about the history of particular foods in Hawaii. I'm curious to learn more about the history of lavosh here. Who introduced it, how did it become such a mainstream product and anything else that might be of interest. Thanks.

"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

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I know we have some forum readers who know a lot about the history of particular foods in Hawaii. I'm curious to learn more about the history of lavosh here. Who introduced it, how did it become such a mainstream product and anything else that might be of interest. Thanks.

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I was told years ago or read in the Advertiser, that the first Restaurant to serve and bake "Lavosh" was at the "Kahala Hilton" under "Chef Weis" who was asked to try baking the flatbread by "Kurt Strand" then a Hilton Vice President who had tried it in Hong Kong and Turkey and thought it would be interesting to prepare and serve in Hawaii.

Irwin

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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You know, of course, about Lavosh Hawaii from Adrienne's GOurmet Foods in Santa Barbara, California? The company began in the 1980s and helped popularize lavosh as a gourmet flatbread on the mainland, removing the ethnic association and substituting the "exotic" but familiar tropics. I vaguely remember that Lavosh Hawaii was acquired (or did a joint marketing venture) with one of the big mainstream food companies some years ago... Nabisco?... but can't find anything about that online.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Thanks to everyone for their input. Gotta say that recipe from the Kahala would make a whole lot of lavosh! I'm sure it could be scaled down for home use. I tried the recipe from Peter Reinhart's Bread Baker's Apprentice (there's a thread in the pastry forum) which is quite different but yielded very good results. I've seen the Kanemitsu Bakery lavosh around and will try that as a comparison. Thanks again.

"Eat it up, wear it out, make it do or do without." TMJ Jr. R.I.P.

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I know we have some forum readers who know a lot about the history of particular foods in Hawaii. I'm curious to learn more about the history of lavosh here. Who introduced it, how did it become such a mainstream product and anything else that might be of interest. Thanks.

Glossyp, you have really been pressing the boundaries of food history in Hawaii lately! At the risk of compromising my book and the chapter on German/Austrian /Swiss cooking in Hawaii, I will throw out a few suggestions and approximations of names and positions. The Kahala Hilton opened in or around 1964. The Executive Chef was Max Wilhelm. The baker, who probably developed the lavosh recipe, was Hans Wierbel. One of the bakers was Rolf Winkler, who went on to develop Patisserie and recently sold the operation. Martin Wyss, who was to develop his fame and fortune at the Kahala Hilton and later open Swiss Inn, was having visa difficulties and just coming into Hawaii, but once here would be instrumental in the success of the Maile Room.

I believe that most of these principals still live in in Hawaii. A treatise on their cooking would be fascinating. I wish that I had the time to do it and will make every effort to do so.

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