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Ore

Italian Markets..

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Ciao Ore,

Sorrento Italian Market in Culver City has been there forever. I haven't been there myself for quite a while, but used to go there quite frequently when I had an office in Culver City. They have great deli and lots of specialty food items, gifts and accessories.

They are at:

5518 Sepulveda Blvd

Culver City, CA

(310) 391-8969

Give them a call and see if they have what you’re looking for or can get it for you.

Elie


Eliahu Yeshua

Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French. Sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek. Soy sauce makes it Chinese; garlic makes it good.

- Alice May Brock

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Mario's Italian Market

740 E. Broadway St. (Glendale St.)

Glendale, CA 91205

818-242-4114

Pretty good to great prices.

They have a deli that serves Italian-American food. They also have imported Italian sausages, cold cuts, cheeses.

There is also Claros.

Pretty much the same as Marios. They both been around ever since I can remember.

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Ore,

Try this place in Burbank:

Monte Carlo Delicatessen & Restaurant

3103 W. Magnolia Blvd.; Burbank, CA 91505; (818) 845-3516

(near the intersection of W. Magnolia Blvd. and N. Fairview St.)

They sell freshly-made gelato which they get locally.

BTW, Mario's was written about a while back by David Shaw in the LA Times.

Ore, Welcome back to LA, man!!


Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

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I second what Kokh Leffle said. Sorrento in Culver City is the best!

However, for an Italian bakery, I love Nicolosi on Ventura in Encino. Cannoli to die for. You won't see them in the case, you have to ask. Then they go to the back and fill them for you fresh so the shells stay crispy!


So long and thanks for all the fish.

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Ore,

will be interested to see how LA markets compare to San Lorenzo!!!

LA markets tend to be Italian-American from at least 2-3 generations ago. The prepared foods and delis especially reflect the big meatballs in lottsa tomato sauce oozing with mozzarella and spicy cold cut submarine sandwiches.

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Ore,

will be interested to see how LA markets compare to San Lorenzo!!!

LA markets tend to be Italian-American from at least 2-3 generations ago. The prepared foods and delis especially reflect the big meatballs in lottsa tomato sauce oozing with mozzarella and spicy cold cut submarine sandwiches.

I second this comment. I have experience with Bay Cities in Santa Monica, Sorrento's in Culver City, and Claros in San Gabriel. Although you can get pretty much everything you need for regional Italian cooking, nobody at any of these stores are educated in any way about the "terroir", if you will, of regional Italian cuisine. And that seems to include the owners as well. Most of the Italian food products they offer, almost seem like novelty items for the hordes that come here to get their Italian-American heros--no tramezzini here.

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Grazie Tutti...

Divina - I don't think I will ever experience such a market outside of Florence, although I remember Barcelona coming close, and Bergen not far behind on the seafood only.

All the input has been great. I want to get more specific and ask for ingredients.

Cheese Curd comes to mind as something I would like to play with, as well as canned tomatoes, but not the San Marzano or others, I am looking for Pomodorrini - anyone have a source?

Anyone know a distributor for restaurants I should get a hold of?

Thanks again!

Ore

(CHECK OUT THE "ISO : California Dining Threads" thread to meet up soon)

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Most of the info here was spot on about the markets listed. There is one more little hidden gem in Santa Monica. Guidi Marcello on 10th st just north of Olympic. It is not a store per se but more of a showroom. They have a bit wider selection and better prices. Do not go to get a sandwich or a 1/2 pound of ham , it is not that kind of place. It is a wholesaler that sells to the public for cash on the sly. Mon - Fri 9 AM to 4PM ONLY!

David


David West

A.K.A. The Mushroom Man

Founder of http://finepalatefoods.com/

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I met who I think is the owner of Mario's years ago. He is Italian from Italy. He kept speaking to me in Italian, despite my obviously heavy French accent. The prepared foods are definately Italian American, although if you are lucky enough to run into the owners they could probably talk a little about real home cooking.

I also met one of the owners of Claros in Arcadia. Apparently it's a family run business and this location is run by one of the daughter's and her husband who also asked me if I was Italian. I would say Claro's is heavily Italian-American. I'm still in culture shock over the size of the sandwiches. It's like a whole dinner plate stuffed into bread.

I've only been to Milan years ago. So I don't know what the markets are like in Florence. But the stores mentioned above do not have an Italian or European feel. The so called gourmet markets that aim for a Euro look are outrageously expensive.

Anyway, I am often mistaken for a Sicilian. For some reason there are more Italians with my last name then in France and I have never met another Algerian with the same last name (outside of my family obviously).


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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For what it's worth, I happen to know the owner of Sorrento's. He's an older gentleman and an Italian immigrant to the US though I don't know exactly where from. He and I know each other through other work though his "office" is adjacent to the store and from the few times we've discussed food, I believe he knows his stuff.

He's also a shrewd businessman so if there is something obscure, he may not have it if he doesn't think he would ever sell it. I bet you could discuss it with him and he would know about it. However, he does have a lot of interesting things on his shelves and in his coolers. He also owns land in the San Joaquin Valley where he grows his own almonds and other things he sells in the market.

If you go, ask for Councilman Vera. Just don't go during almond harvest season or on Monday's when he's at City Hall.


Edited by JFLinLA (log)

So long and thanks for all the fish.

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