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ronnie_suburban

Gefilte Fish

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Beautiful Ronnie!  How does it taste?

One questions, did you have fish heads in while the ball were cooking?  Couldn't tell from the pic.

Thanks hillvalley :smile:

The stuff tastes great and no, we didn't cook them directly with the fish carcass. Instead we boiled the carcass for several hours to create the cooking stock--figuring that by doing so, we'd effectively extract all the gelatinous properties from the bones, etc. and there was no need to leave them in during the actual cooking.

After the gefilte fish were done, we then cooked the carrots (to be served with the fish) in the liquid, removed them, and then reduced the stock for several more hours. By the time I took it off the stove last night, there was just about 2 quarts of liquid left. This morning, after sitting in the fridge overnight, it was very gelatinous, so I guess the plan worked.

Fresser, I was pleasantly shocked by Lucas' innate ability at forming the fish logs. He's a natural. I guess he's got the gene :biggrin: His product was better than either mine or Dean's as they had nearly perfect structural integrity. :biggrin:

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Great photos, Ronnie. Yeah, you can get ready-made gefilte fish, but yours was made with love :laugh:

I notice the NY Times Jewish Cookbook in the background of photo 2. Did you use a recipe from there?


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

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I notice the NY Times Jewish Cookbook in the background of photo 2.  Did you use a recipe from there?

Good eye Bloviatrix...you are correct. :smile: That recipe was the starting point, and we strayed from it only slightly.

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Do you serve Gefilte Fish cold from the refrigerator, or do you take it out and let it come to room temperature? Serving suggestions greatly appreciated! Thanks.


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Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

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I prefer them at room temperature.

Me too. Especially in another room.


peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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For some reason, chilling actually improves the flavor ... maybe it kills some of the less desirable elements ... :hmmm:


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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My mother always put it on the table before the start of the seder, so by the time we ate it, it was no longer refrigerator cold, but not quite room tempurature, either. I think that is how I like it best - slightly chilled.


"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" (coined while playing with my food at Lolita).

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

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None, really, Caroline ... my offbeat sense of humor ... :hmmm:

But, this did cause me to do a bit of research on gefilte fish in more depth .. and I read this highly interesting article on the subject:

When Hearty Gefilte Fish Kept Shtetls Stuffed by the Forward food editor, Matthew Goodman (no relation)

Gefilte fish is at once the zenith and nadir of Ashkenazic cookery: Is there any other dish that so typifies its extraordinary resourcefulness in the Old World and its long decline in the New?

.... in jars in the appetizing cases of the local supermarket. This is a shame, really, because jarred gefilte fish tends to be rubbery and gelatinous, the sort of thing that could put one off the stuff for life. Homemade gefilte fish, on the other hand, can be a treat, delicate in taste and feathery light.


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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In general I prefer most of my food neither very hot nor very cold. I find that flavors are much more discernable that way.

Gefilte fish is a conundrum for me. I enjoy the gelled broth. Its wonderful scooped up on a piece of matzo with the juices from the chrain. Yet I don’t really care for very cold gefilte fish. So I tend to walk the middle road. Cold enough to keep the broth gelled yet warm enough to taste the complexity and subtlety of flavors.

Elie


Eliahu Yeshua

Tomatoes and oregano make it Italian; wine and tarragon make it French. Sour cream makes it Russian; lemon and cinnamon make it Greek. Soy sauce makes it Chinese; garlic makes it good.

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do you think that this recipe of joan nathan's could be halved.  i only have 9 or 10 people  at our table and so i don't feel like making such a large amount.

tia

elark

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do you think that this recipe of joan nathan's could be halved.  i only have 9 or 10 people  at our table and so i don't feel like making such a large amount.

tia

elark

 

I have no doubt that it could be halved. Depending on the pan, it might need less than the two hours total cooking time. Monitor it accordingly.

 

However...the recipe says "20 appetizer portions," but that depends on the size of your portions :raz:  and whether anyone asks for seconds (which some probably will). Not to mention it keeps for at least five days in the fridge, so you could give some to your guests to take home (and, of course, keep some for yourself, if you like).


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