Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Susan in FL

What Beers Did You Drink Today? Or Yesterday? (Part 1)

Recommended Posts

Victory Storm King imperial stout, nice but nothing special so need to retest.

Storm King was very dissapointing this year. Just a shadow of its former glory. Not sure if it is due to the new brewery that Victory is using or what.

I didn't know that Victory was using a new brewery. I went to the website and just saw a brief mention about it. Is it at the same location, and when did it open?

The first batches came out of the brewery late last year. I am not sure where it is located. I do however know that many folks have noticed a decline in their overall product since moving over to the new brewery. Personally I have only tried the Storm King and the Old Horizontal recently. As I mentioned before the Storm King was nowhere near what it once was while the Old Horizontal was good though not superb.

I think that they are now brewing all bottled product out of the new brewery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Day before yesterday: I drank some Boddingtons and Guinness Draught.

Yesterday: Henninger Lager. Not exactly GOOD beer per se, its sorta skunky and a bit too sweet for its style. I dunno, it is remarkably cheap though, and I am poor at the moment. $4.79 for a 6pack of pints is insane... and its way better than busweiser.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night after class: Cantillon Kriek

makes for a nice sleeping pill. ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday: New Glarus Brewing Edel Pils, Leinenkugel's Red, and ahem, Rolling Rock.

Today: Unibroue La Fin du Monde


Edited by joey madison (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

please don't tell my husband that I just found another interesting forum on EGullet that I now will have to check daily!!! :shock:

I am very intrigued by all the beers you're describing. A lot of them I've never heard of, I think they are many American brews?

I love good beer and discovering new ones. Here in Amsterdam, you can do that 2 ways: there are specialty beer shops, that sell nothing but beer (and I bet they sell lots of the stuff that is mentioned on this thread) or you go to a bar that specializes in beer, they will have many different ones on tap and lots more in a bottle.

Is it like that in the US?


Edited by Chufi (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

last night while catching up on our day johnnybird and i shared a dogfish head chicory stout. oh dear! oh my! oh gollygosh!!! nice dark brown color little bit of a head but not overly fizzy. smooth - john said it was a light stout- and creamy with out the burnt flavor i taste in guinness. maybe a little on the sweet side but i really, really liked it. good thing there are 5 more in the cellar :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yesterday was:

Goose Island IPA

Hazed and Infused dry hopped ale (Rockies Brewing Company)

Mojo IPA (Rockies Brewing Company)

Pyramid IPA

I picked up those last 3 when I was in Omaha last week. Went to a place called the Crescent Moon Ale House, which you should definitely check out if you find yourself in Omaha.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some good beers being consumed out there...who knew???

Today, I had a real winner:

Alpha King Pale Ale by Three Floyds Brewing

Here are my tasting notes:

Appearance: Pours a medium amber clear body with a nice fluffy head that leaves lacing all over the place

Smell: Loads of sweet citrus fruit; ruby red grapefruit, a touch of treacle and some alcohol (after all this is over 7% ABV)

Taste: The hops take a whack at your taste buds right off the bat but there is a wonderful blending with the malt that distinguishes this brew from other pale ales; incredibly well-balanced so that the bitterness never overwhelms

Mouthfeel: Nice and full-bodied for a pale ale with a healthy dose of carbonation

Drinkability: This is a very satisfying example of the style.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonight: Rogue Dead Guy Ale

Chufi,

Here you can usually find better beers at specialty shops or at a good bar that has a wide selection. I also have had luck in finding little shops, groceries or even conveinence stores that carry anything from a huge microbrew/specialty section to a dozen or so very good beers.

When I lived in Columbus Ohio I had a small place called Dairy Family that looked like a total dump right down the street. It was a shop ran by an indian family. When I first moved there I never thought to get anything but cigarettes there. One day I was wandering through the store and I looked at the large beer cooler and realized that they had well over 100 microbrews of very high quality, some of such small production numbers that they came in unmarked white 6-pack carrying cases with hand pasted labels. They had the full selection of Bells (kalamazoo brewing company), Rogue, and even Unibrou. They also had a selection of around 75 imports of high quality. I could get Corsendonk or Chimay, even some Lindemans Lambic. I became VERY good friends with those people very quickly.

Now that I live in a small town where the cows outnumber the people I have found that my local independent grocery has a selection of about 30 high quality microbrews and another 20 imports of good quality. I found beers that I would never expect to see in such a small town. I guess I've just been lucky.


Edited by Matsusaka Ushi (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today at lunch I had a Harmon Brewery [Tacoma, WA] Point Defiance IPA draught ale.

It poured a hazy organge, with a tight, off white head. Light, but definite aroma of citrusy hops. Medium to light mouthfeel, soft carbonation. Very pronounced citrus hop flavour at first, combination of burnt orange and light grapefruit taste from dryhopping Amarillo hops in secondary fermentation delicately offset by light caramel malt. Rather short finish of hop and malt falvours but a longish, slightly sticky, appropriate dry bitterness persists. Overall, a very solid example of an American IPA, though on the weak side with 5.8 abv.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First post in the Beer forum, though I don’t know why it took so long!

My beer tastes are varied, but for background, my favourites include Shaftsbury (local microbrew) Rainforest or Cream Ale and Kokanee (another “local” though the brewery was bought by Labatts quite a few years ago) for everyday drinking, and Smithwicks because it’s a damned good beer. When in Seattle I used to love picking up a 6 pk of Red Hook double black stout but sadly they have discontinued this :sad: ! :angry: ! :sad: !!!

Anyway, at an eGullet dinner function last Monday night at Chambar, a Vancouver resto with a Belgium / Moroccan theme, I had a Palm (original post here) and an Orval (better impressions here).

Like I said in the first post, I was totally impressed by the Palm. I’d asked for a slightly bitter ale, and though the beer actually had a sweet tone to it, I loved it. Anyone else tried this Belgian beauty? I’ve searched the forum for it but haven’t found much. Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The posts on this thread are mouth-watering!

Stegmaier Gold Medal.  Great taste and outrageously cheap.  $11.00 for a 24 pack case, 16 oz bottles.  Great to enjoy for drinking and cooking.

That IS outrageously cheap. I didn't know of that beer, so I did a search to find out a little about it. In case it's new to anybody else as well: It's an American-style lager [that is correct, isn't it?] made by The Lion Brewery in PA.

please don't tell my husband that I just found another interesting forum on EGullet that I now will have to check daily!!!  :shock:

I am very intrigued by all the beers you're describing. A lot of them I've never heard of, I think they are many American brews?

I love good beer and discovering new ones. Here in Amsterdam, you can do that 2 ways: there are specialty beer shops, that sell nothing but beer (and I bet they sell lots of the stuff that is mentioned on this thread) or you go to a bar that specializes in beer, they will have many different ones on tap and lots more in a bottle.

Is it like that in the US?

Chufi, I'm so glad you found this thread and the Beer Forum. I have noticed good-looking beer in some of your food photos. :smile:

Welcome. I will not tell your husband. :biggrin:

I see that so far one fellow beer lover has responed to your questions about how to discover new beers in the U.S. To add to that, I think of three main things for finding good beers, brew pubs and beer bars and good beer stores/specialty shops. That sounds much like you described in The Netherlands.

Yes, many American Brews... Do you find American microbrews in Amsterdam?

last night while catching up on our day johnnybird and i shared a dogfish head chicory stout.  oh dear! oh my! oh gollygosh!!!  nice dark brown color little bit of a head but not overly fizzy.  smooth - john said it was a light stout- and creamy with out the burnt flavor i taste in guinness.  maybe a little on the sweet side but i really, really liked it.  good thing there are 5 more in the cellar :biggrin:

Yesssss!! I knew you would find a stout you really, really like. I love Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout, too, and am glad that Dogfish Head beers in general are showing up in Florida. There is hope.

yesterday was:

Goose Island IPA

Hazed and Infused dry hopped ale (Rockies Brewing Company)

Mojo IPA (Rockies Brewing Company)

Pyramid IPA

...Four of my favorites! I am drinking Wild Goose IPA even as we speak, but I wish it was a different goose. I wish it was Goose Island. I am about to switch to Tuppers Hop Pocket.

The Wild Goose is drinkable, but the least favorite of the beers we have on hand right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BCinBC, better late than never. :smile: Glad you posted. I'm looking forward to hearing more about foods and beers that you enjoy. Thanks for the links.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am about to switch to Tuppers Hop Pocket

Susan so what do you think? i tried it a while ago but don't remember if i liked it or not...

maybe it's time to have a thread on our hop favorites!

i'm having Flying Fish Extra Pale Ale tonight, and can't really describe it better than somebody already did on ratebeer:

"Pretty bland, doesn’t really speak strongly of either malt or hops, but instead of a flat bread and hints of dried apricot. Very smooth and not too watery, nice and evenly viscous on the palate. Extremely drinkable, but not notably amazing."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I encountered some strange bedfellows- Reissdorf Kolsch and Stone IPA. I found both to be excellent, but for different reasons. The Reissdorf was elegant and subtle while the Stone was powerful yet balanced. They both represented their respective styles well while displaying a certain personality.

Tonight started with some 'old reliables'- Saranac Adirondac Amber and IPA from a trail mix pack. Then I took a bit of a quantum leap to a Westvleteren 12. With this one I chose to take no notes, just to bask in its glory. But I do have another. All I can say right now is that the word 'magnificent' may be an understatement in describing this beer...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have recently discovered Nimbus' fine brews made right here in Tucson. Love the Pale Ale, the Brown Ale, and most recently, "Dirty Guera" - great taste and fine label art to boot! The Dirty Guera has become my preferred brew to accompany any activity on my Weber kettle. Have yet to try the very reputable "Monkeyshine" also by Nimbus. Perhaps a few other Western U.S./Southwestern U.S. eGulleteers may be able to concur (or perhaps dispute).

Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm visiting Wisconsin (Madison), so with pizza tonight I enjoyed a bottle of New Glarus Brewing's Spotted Cow ale. An easy-to-like brew.

Oh, man, now you are making me jealous. I grew up near New Glarus and love those beers. A pony keg of Spotted Cow, friends, some meat, and a grill. The best! That and the beers from Kalamazoo Brewing (Two Hearted Ale!) are almost enough to make me move back to the midwest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night at the new Grey Lodge Kitchen, the upstairs restaurant at the Grey Lodge in Philly (www.greylodge.com):

New Magic Mushroom Spinach wraps, with a Flying Fish Hopfish IPA; a silky smooth Troegs Dead Reckoning Porter; and a nice, crisp Victory Prima Pils. But not in that order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hertog Jan Meibok

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now: Ballard Bitters (aka Redhook IPA).

Usually: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

Sometimes: Lagunitas IPA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I had planned to drink my one lonely bottle of Rodenbach Alexander in celebration of the wonderful news that the Ivory-billed Woodpecker has been confirmed as NOT extinct. However I was assaulted by a sudden onset cold and so it looks like tonight will instead be Rodenbach Alexander night. I am really looking forward to this one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now, I am sipping on a St. Peter's Old Style Porter. Great packaging in an old medicine bottle and a lovely roasted coffee nose and taste. A bit light in the body but plenty of complexity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

another mcewan's ipa while working on making the red chile sauce for tonight's dinner - cheese enchiladas. now, with the enchiladas, a negro modela - or two.

though in between i did try a mango margarita from robb walsh's tex-mex cookbook. a bit to strong for me so i cut it with some orange seltzer...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      500 years ago, Martin Luther started off the Reformation. In a way, this not only changed religious affairs in Europe, but also changed our beer.
       
      Article here.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×