Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Maekawa


Recommended Posts

Cheers, from a new poster, to Sr. Amster-Burton's review of Maekawa bar in today's Times. If you don't know the place, also make sure to visit Fort St. George across the stairs -- longtime haunt of the multi-cultural young Japanese crowd, and those of us who appreciate the whole culture blender thing. (Assuming the Fort is still open -- haven't been down in a couple months. It's also a great place to take kids for an early dinner out, if you don't mind a bit o' smoke.)

On a related note: cheers for both go to the late, great Ueichi (sp?) Maekawa, with his ponytail, love of rock and roll, and devotion to the Ms. Maekawa Bar, as we always understood it, was basically his grown up place for people who weren't up for the kids at Fort St. George.

Richard W. Mockler

Seattle

I will, in fact, eat anything once.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're interested in Asian adaptations of Western dishes, try Purple Dot Cafe and Pacific Garden. Pacific Garden is a small chicken-curry-and-spaghetti joint. Purple Dot Cafe is a little glitzier, with a much longer menu (actually 3 or 4 different menus last time we were there), containing some good things and some bizarre things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with you on the Otokoyama, jbonne - my fave - although I'm partial to it from a cedar box, because that's the way I first tasted it. With salt. Now I can't wait to try the renkon butter. Do you have a suggestion on the best dried bonito for this dish?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have to admit i've done approximately zero testing of dried bonito. in fact, the bonito shavings in my house predate my moving into it, so i'm no help there.

Otokoyama is wonderful, with its full body, though i'm partial to Suishin myself. but its availability there is on and off, so i just rely on the bottle in my fridge.

as i'm sure mamster can attest, there's nary a weak dish on the menu. i haven't always been bowled over by the mackerel and some of the sashimi isn't as good as elsewhere (but then, they're not a sashimi place) but Maekawa remains, hands down, one of my five favorite places to eat in Seattle. their onigiri alone can make any day 10 times better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words, everyone. I should point out that I got one detail wrong: the shochu is Japanese, not Korean, vodka. There is also soju on the menu, which is Korean vodka. However did I get this wrong?

There's an energy and comfort level about Maekawa that I think I didn't really capture. It's hard to imagine ever turning down an invitation to go there.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.....

There's an energy and comfort level about Maekawa that I think I didn't really capture. It's hard to imagine ever turning down an invitation to go there.

Most definitely. It radiates great vibes to go along with the snackyness. Mmmmm, takoyaki.

Maneki is also worth checking out for the same reasons, for those who haven't been. Only a tiny sake list but plenty of small traditional plates.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And Maneki, alas, is another example of a place whose guiding spirit (Kozo-san, in this case) is no longer with us.

The only thing to watch for about Maneki is a tendency in the last few years towards USA-style super-sized sushi.

Richard W. Mockler

Seattle

I will, in fact, eat anything once.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.....

There's an energy and comfort level about Maekawa that I think I didn't really capture. It's hard to imagine ever turning down an invitation to go there.

Most definitely. It radiates great vibes to go along with the snackyness. Mmmmm, takoyaki.

Amen! Maekawa is a kick-ass restaurant. The first time I went, I went with a bunch of like-minded friends. There were six of us young-ish guys eating like madmen and drinking our proverbial tails off. Some calm-looking Japenese men were seated right next to us and one of them eventually leaned over and poked my elbow. I turned around and he said, "You want eat sperm?"

My friends, naturally, all stopped their conversations and nearly gave themselves whiplash by turning in my direction. I smiled and tried to say, as politely as I could, "Sorry, I, uh, well, no, no sperm... thanks anyway."

The guy poked me again and said, "I ordered it already!" Just as he said it, the server delivered a plate of shirako (image). My friends stared, totally agape. I put the whole damn thing in my mouth. Whether or not it's purely a psychological response to what it actually is (a cod sperm sac), I must say that I won't have it again... its texture was uncomfortably creamy.

As the night went on, the neighboring table and ours got into some "we can order more drinks for you than you can for us" contest. Needless to say, much of the rest of the night was a blur.

...but that kind of experience is typical, I think. If you're in a good mood, it's essentially impossible to have a bad time there.

edited to add: And I agree about the takoyaki. Fantastic.

Edited by jrt (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The one dish I always (usually) order at Maekawa is the renkon butter. I'm actually a vegetarian and try fruitlessly to avoid katsuobushi when I am in Japan, but I don't mind it too much; I just avoid eating huge amounts of it. My vegetarian habit has for the last 7 years or so been mostly built on taste preferences and not on a lot of ideology.

The one think I will say, though, is that recently grated katsuo tastes much nicer than the prepackaged stuff, and also thicker shavings taste less bitter than thin ones, which probably lose a lot of the good volatile flavor compounds from exposure of more surface area to air.

(Edit: I'd like to point out that the "thicker shavings" comment applies to the pre-packaged variety. If you're going to use them right away, shaving the katsuobushi thin is just right).

Edited by JasonTrue (log)

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Asian food with western blend is very popular in Southern California and in Asia for years.

Interesting that it hasnt caught on in Seattle.

There will be stir-fry items with spaghetti, steak with spaghetti, baked breaded chicken over fried rice etc

The only restaurants that I know of that serve such food is Purple Dot Cafe and Fort St George.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Asian food with western blend is very popular in Southern California and in Asia for years.

Interesting that it hasnt caught on in Seattle.

There will be stir-fry items with spaghetti, steak with spaghetti, baked breaded chicken over fried rice etc

The only restaurants that I know of that serve such food is Purple Dot Cafe and Fort St George.

Agree, I love that kind of food when I'm in LA, and got to taste bubble tea there years before we got it here, though still a good 10 years after its invention in Taiwan, hehe.

Sadly, we lack the Asian population density in the city proper for more such places. Any of LA's individual Asian districts or neighborhoods is many times larger than the ID, and hopping with activity later too.

It's ok though, there's a time and place for everything.

I only wish Fort St. George wasn't so smoky.

Pat

"I... like... FOOD!" -Red Valkyrie, Gauntlet Legends-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IF The Pacific Cafe is the one on the corner, I think I would suggest that over the Purple Dot. Dunno, the Purple Dot just seems a little slick and corporate to me. Infinetly (sp?) more important then that though, my Dad says that the Pacific Cafe reminds him of the restos that my Grandpa would take him to in Hong Kong, just after the war. He remembers them well, as that was a huge treat for him.

I ate at a few of those places myself when I was there with my Uncle. He called it "Chinglish" food...which I think is a: Frickin Hilarious, and b: spot on right.

Toast with Condensed milk, a bowl of Borscht, hot Coca Cola, and Baked Fish with Cheese over Rice, anyone? :laugh:

"So, do you want me to compromise your meal for you?" - Waitress at Andy's Diner, Dec 4th, 2004.

The Fat Boy Guzzle --- 1/2 oz each Jack Daniels, Wild Turkey, Southern Comfort, Absolut Citron over ice in a pint glass, squeeze 1/2 a lemon and top with 7-up...Credit to the Bar Manager at the LA Cafe in Hong Kong who created it for me on my hire. Thanks, Byron. Hope you are well!

http://bloatitup.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope...Rickety Double Decker MTR Bus!

Whoooo Hooo!!!! :laugh::laugh::laugh:

"So, do you want me to compromise your meal for you?" - Waitress at Andy's Diner, Dec 4th, 2004.

The Fat Boy Guzzle --- 1/2 oz each Jack Daniels, Wild Turkey, Southern Comfort, Absolut Citron over ice in a pint glass, squeeze 1/2 a lemon and top with 7-up...Credit to the Bar Manager at the LA Cafe in Hong Kong who created it for me on my hire. Thanks, Byron. Hope you are well!

http://bloatitup.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, but in Taiwan they look at you funny when you say you don't want the bubbles.  Besides when I'm in Taiwan I'm too busy drinking guava juice and grass juice to get bubble teas.

Rocky

no bubbles? :shock: but they're so much fun to spit out the window while driving! just try not to laugh too hard...promotes choking.

yes, i am 16.

from overheard in new york:

Kid #1: Paper beats rock. BAM! Your rock is blowed up!

Kid #2: "Bam" doesn't blow up, "bam" makes it spicy. Now I got a SPICY ROCK! You can't defeat that!

--6 Train

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm surprised to see that people like the Purple Dot. I ate there once, and my food (vegetables and tofu) was a big blob of goo served in a 9" pie pan. The spring rolls were incredibly greasy. Maybe I just ordered the wrong things, but did I mention the roaches?

I walked by about a month ago; there was a sign outside about new management. Perhaps things have improved, but I'm scared to go back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...