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Pam R

eG Foodblog: Pam R - I dare you to PASSOVER this one

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Even though there was so much food, about an hour and a half after I got home, I wanted a piece of chocolate chip chiffon cake.... (I think it's because I lost my cookie!)

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Whew. It's been a crazy week. I'm almost ready to crash for the night. But tonight was a lovely night - I really enjoy spending these holidays with family - and it's nice to be cooked for!

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Your last (but not least) post/pic really summed up your blog...true dedication to eGullet. Glad you had an enjoyable and relaxing dinner...you deserve it!

T H A N K Y O U !

p/s Are you sure that's all the little cookie-pilferer stole - a cookie? I think she stole your heart too :wub: .


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Pam, I've been skimming your blog in a futile attempt to catch up since I hit the road. This is my one chance, I think, before your blog finishes, to say how much I've been enjoying this and learning from it. The photos are beautiful. As I read in more detail after the blog is closed, I know I'll learn yet more. Add my admiration and compliments to the rest - how you survived the week - well, it's almost another miracle! :smile:

Thank you, thank you.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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This is it folks! Today is my last day to blog so I've decided to try to cram in some "passover" foods that have eluded the blog thus far.

Breakfast was matzoh-brei or fried matzoh. Everybody has their own way to make it - some like it sweet, some like it savory. I'm a sweet girl. I break up a sheet of matzoh, place in a bowl and pour boiling water from the kettle over it. Let it absorb for 30-60 seconds then drain. Add one egg, pinch of salt and fry up in oil...or butter. :wink: Serve with syrop. On other threads I've seen people eat it with jam.. something I've never done and may have to try soon. This is the French-toast of the kosher for passover world:

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OK. The secret ingredient that many Jewish cooks know... is onion soup.  That's all. No other seasoning (other than tons of garlic).. it all comes in the soup mix.  Like I said, it's not exactly 'gourmet' but it's so good! Try it and let me know what you think.

Our "secret" seasoning mix: onion soup mix, a chopped-up onion, and apricot nectar. (I prefer nectar from a jar rather than a can, if I can find it.) Put it all in with the meat and cook low and slow until it's so tender you could cut it with a spoon. I usually use my crockpot. When it's not Passover, we serve with egg noodles. Yummy! :wub:

Anyone else out there do meat with fruit?

MelissaH


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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p/s Are you sure that's all the little cookie-pilferer stole - a cookie? I think she stole your heart too :wub: .

Guilty. She is an absolutely crazy child - and I love her!

Thank you, thank you.

You're welcome :biggrin:

Anyone else out there do meat with fruit?

We don't usually do beef with fruit, but many a piece of Apricot/Honey chicken is eaten at Pesach - and I like lamb with fruit... oh my other favorite is fruit compote with turkey. Nobody made fruit compote this year :sad:

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I'm off for a while - real estate agents need to be phoned because we have two months to get a new store set up with a kitchen - and we don't have a place yet!!

It's also my father's birthday this week... so I'm going to try to bake him a birthday cake... but we'll see if that happens today or not.

Talk to you later,

-Pam

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A few days ago I promised to take a few pictures of my kitchen at work. This has been our kitchen for 15 years - but we only have another 2 months here, then we need to start all over again. It works well for us - divided into two main sections - the first picture is of the 'meat' section - it has a double convection oven, gas range and grill, fryers and our huge, ancient steam unit. We bought it used over 20 years ago and are leaving all of it behind when we move. The steam unit holds 8 perferated pans and the soup kettle holds about 100 L of soup.

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This next picture is the baking area. It as a triple deck oven (each deck holds 3 full sheet pans), another gas range, a sink for the baking area and 2 large hobart mixers. We're leaving the ovens but taking the butcher block tables. You can't really see, but on the left side there are more stainless counters and another sink - dairy.

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I was trying to show you the size of our kitchen in this picture - but I don't think it comes through well. We have lots of space - especially since there are only 4 of us who work there.

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Our kitchen also houses a walk in cooler that's about 10x10 and two walk in freezers - an 8x8 and a 10x15.

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For lunch today I enjoyed a piece of cheddar vegetable kugel:

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And I got most of my father's birthday cake done. First I baked a chocolate chiffon cake in a sheet pan:

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I cut it into 6 equal squares and the first 5 layers got a thin coating of orange zested whipped topping, which was piped to form a border and filled with orange curd. (does anybody else have a problem getting orange curd to set up? I use the same recipe as I use for my lemon curd but it stays much looser)

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The whole thing got a quick crumb coat before going into the freezer to set up:

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After about an hour I added a poured chocolate icing to it:

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Alas I didn't have time to finish it. I'll end up piping something on to finish it off - but it'll be in the freezer until Friday.

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Last but not least, my last chance to throw in a passover meal:

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That's right! Salami and eggs. It ain't a french omelet, but it hit the spot.

Tomorrow I go back to lots of salads and chicken. this last week I think I've eaten more beef than I generally do in a month - but it sure was good!

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Pam,

Thanks for opening a window into an amazing world! I followed your blog religiously. :biggrin:


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

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Passover recipe just in from Rabbi Ribeye who is smoking turkeys and ducks for the holiday:

Outstanding drizzled on smoked goose, duck, turkey, game, seared duck, tuna and other fish that are complemented by a fruity-piquant flavor.

FIG-SANGRIA SAUCE

10 small dried Calmyrna figs, halved

2 cups sweet port (I use Kedem ...GG)

juice of 2 navel oranges

juice of 1 lime

1-2 tablespoons sugar

fig balsamic and/or additional lime juice

Poach figs in port until figs are soft and port is reduced by 1/4.  Add orange and lime juices and puree ingredients together in blender.  Return to saucepan.  Add tablespoon sugar.  Reduce until "stick to back of spoon" consistency. 

Taste and adjust, based on sweet/tartness of fruit:  too piquant, add sugar; too sweet, add lime juice or splash of balsamic (a personal favorite); too thick, a little more port.

This recipe sounds amazing - did you try it?

Aw shucks ... I had picked up your hint and gotten as far as going "Okay, it's got to be a member of the Guess Who, but which one?" So do I win the Classic Rock Trivia Geek Consolation Prize?  :laugh:

Depends - can you tell me which local synagogue he used to perform in during dances?? :wink:

Your Pavlova (pavlovas? what's the plural?) are beautiful, Pam.  After this is all over, i'd be interested in your (basic) recipe.  I have to make it for 75 people two weeks from now....and i've never made it before  :blink:

Pavlova:

5 egg whites

1/4 tsp. | 1 mL salt

1/2 tsp. | 2 mL vanilla extract

1 cup | 250 mL sugar

Using a stand mixer with a whisk attachment start beating the egg whites and salt until they are frothy and forming very soft peaks. Add the vanilla and continue to whisk.

Slowly add the sugar, a tablespoon at a time while continuing to beat the eggs on high until they are glossy and stiff peaks form.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Spoon all of the meringue into the center of the pan and smooth out with the spoon to form a nice, even mound. Use a spoon to form a well in the center of the meringue, pushing the meringue from the center to the edges of the Pavlova. (or pipe into small, individual meringues)

Place the meringue in a preheated 250ºF | 120º C oven for 2 hours. Turn the oven off and allow the Pavlova to cool in the oven (if you can, leave it in the oven overnight).

I prefer to bake these in a convection oven - reduce the heat to 225.

There are other recipes that include corn starch or cream of tartar - but these things aren't allowed for Passover - so this is just a basic meringue recipe that we use for the Pavlovas

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My time here is quickly winding down. In a few hours this blog will be over and I've had such a wonderful time. I just went through the whole thing and I want to thank everybody for participating and wishing me well.

It seems like it's been months since I started blogging, and at the same time I can't believe it's over!

I want to thank Soba and all of the egullet behind-the-scenes folks who co-ordinate all of this. This forum is an amazing resource and I appreciate all the work that's put into it. Thanks.

I'll be around for an hour or so - then we'll be shut down. I'm always happy to discuss anything that we started here or anything else about Jewish or Kosher food (or baking or anything else) in another thread - or in PMs. Don't hesitate to ask.

Thanks again everybody.

- Pam

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Thank you for doing this Pam. I can't tell you how often I just needed a break during all my preparations and cooking last week. This blog and the other Passover-related threads were perfect!

I hope you get a chance to relax now.

jayne

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My time here is quickly winding down.  In a few hours this blog will be over and I've had such a wonderful time.  I just went through the whole thing and I want  to thank everybody for participating and wishing me well. 

It seems like it's been months since I started blogging, and at the same time I can't believe it's over!

I want to thank Soba and all of the egullet behind-the-scenes folks who co-ordinate all of this.  This forum is an amazing resource and I appreciate all the work that's put into it.  Thanks.

I'll be around for an hour or so - then we'll be shut down.  I'm always happy to discuss anything that we started here or anything else about Jewish or Kosher food (or baking or anything else) in another thread - or in PMs.  Don't hesitate to ask.

Thanks again everybody.

- Pam

This was a wonderful blog! I so enjoyed reading it & can't believe you undertook to blog during such a hectic week of preparations!!!


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Aw shucks ... I had picked up your hint and gotten as far as going "Okay, it's got to be a member of the Guess Who, but which one?" So do I win the Classic Rock Trivia Geek Consolation Prize?  :laugh:

Depends - can you tell me which local synagogue he used to perform in during dances?? :wink:

Oops and alas ... no entry on that in my little mental rock-trivia file. Now if you'd asked for an analogous level of detail about my favorite nice Jewish rock-boy, Donald Fagen ... (and that may be as close to on-topic as I can bring this response) ... :laugh:

Again, let me add my thanks for a terrific and heartwarming blog!

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Once again, thanks so much for reading and sharing my week with me - it was my pleasure and I was happy to have you along for the ride. I look forward to relaxing and looking in on the life of the next blogger.

Happy holidays and Goodnight.

:smile: Pam

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And another fantastic foodblog has reached its end! We thank you all for your excellent participation in and support of Pam's great efforts. A final round of applause for Pam!

As you may have noticed, we have been enjoying a series of lively discussions on Passover in recent days, including this one about Seder menus and this one about vegetarian dishes at Passover. We'd love to see you continue your contributions to the Society as a whole in those threads -- and, of course, if you don't see an existing topic on something that interests you, why go ahead and make a new one!

Thanks again to Pam and y'all. Sleep well.


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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