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pastryjen

Cake Fondant

199 posts in this topic

No, not like a Lucky Charms marshmallow -- either from the box or in milk. It's a little chewy, and sweet faint vanilla flavor. Can't think of what I would compare it too. Gum is too sticky.

A lot of people don't like it, but I don't find it offensive. I don't like the texture along with the cake, but when using it, I must admit I eat little scraps...

But, if you try it DON'T get the Wilton stuff. Just not good.


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Mayhaw is campaigning against fondant. It must have done something very very bad to him in a past life. He's a man with ........ issues. Serious molded sugar issues. Everyone has a different palate. I don't think that just because you personally don't like something, that you should be telling everyone else how awful it is. Let people try things with an open mind and no preconceived notions so they can make their own decisions.....yes? :wink:

I could go on a campaign against rhubarb, because I think PINK CELERY is an abomination!!!! But I don't......in fact, even though I personally hate rhubarb I actually make desserts with it because MY CUSTOMERS LIKE IT. I don't give them a strawberry rhubarb tart and say "You know, you really shouldn't be eating this shit, because I don't."

/ok, end rant. :laugh:

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I could go on a campaign against rhubarb, because I think PINK CELERY is an abomination!!!!

Uh Oh I totally agree on that one :wacko: ."Pink celery" :laugh::laugh:


Vanessa

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Mayhaw is campaigning against fondant. It must have done something very very bad to him in a past life. He's a man with ........ issues. Serious molded sugar issues. Everyone has a different palate. I don't think that just because you personally don't like something, that you should be telling everyone else how awful it is. Let people try things with an open mind and no preconceived notions so they can make their own decisions.....yes? :wink:

I could go on a campaign against rhubarb, because I think PINK CELERY is an abomination!!!! But I don't......in fact, even though I personally hate rhubarb I actually make desserts with it because MY CUSTOMERS LIKE IT. I don't give them a strawberry rhubarb tart and say "You know, you really shouldn't be eating this shit, because I don't."

/ok, end rant. :laugh:

Well, my problem is that I'm very stubborn when I get my mind set on something so, I just have to try some poured fondant now out of complete curiosity. I won't inflict it on anybody else but, I simply must know what this stuff tastes like!

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So you'd choose a slice of pie over a slice of cake with fondant?

That would, of course, depend on the pie, but, for the sake of argument, damn right I would.

On the other hand, as referenced in the other important thread, if the fondant-which, in my opinion, makes not such a bad version of portable, moldable tupperware-was easy to peel back, I would probably go for the cake if it was of such quality that peeling and discarding the covering was worth the trouble.

The thing is, as I have opined before, that if the baker is going to all of the trouble to make a fabulous wedding cake (and it is called a CAKE-those things covered in fondant would better be called WEDDING DECORATIONS) why cover it with plastic goo? Just let the moist delicious confection stand free in all it's glory.

Of course, milage may vary with driving habits and conditions. Your experience may differ.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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I just have to try some poured fondant now out of complete curiosity.

Ok, you mean rolled fondant, don't you? Now I'm confused.

why cover it with plastic goo?

Because....dude! We have to deal with brides (and other clients) who want the freakin' UNIVERSE. They want yummy cake.....and they also want the kind of decorations that just AREN'T POSSIBLE with buttercream! Fondant is not a horrible thing, but I will say if I am making a cake PURELY for purposes of taste and taste only, then will I use fondant? NO. I don't think fondant is the best tasting thing in the world......neither are a lot of foods. Besides a cake, how many foods can you name that are traditionally and commonly labored over for looks as a big part of it? Ok, besides ice sculptures. :raz: Yeah sure, there are chocolate and sugar and bread showpieces, but they are not eaten.

We cake artists have a tough job. Taste IS as important as appearance (as far as I'm concerned anyway). But when you have a bride that wants you to make their cake look like a giant roller coaster ride, what do you do? You do what you have to. You have to make compromises. Fondant is part of it. Is it the yummiest thing? No. Is it the worst? No. And there are some people who will always dislike it, and there's some people that actually think it rocks.

Just like with ALL foods. That's my point. Taste is subjective.....I believe in letting people discover their own tastes for themselves. I'm certainly not going to lead them in any direction with my personal opinion......because heck, you could ruin the sale. :wink:

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I just have to try some poured fondant now out of complete curiosity.

Ok, you mean rolled fondant, don't you? Now I'm confused.

I meant rolled-sorry about that! Too much time spent on the internet reading about the various types of fondants got my brain in a jumble :wacko:


Edited by Velma (log)

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I stayed out of the last round...because I found it rather insulting I use rolled fondant on all my cakes and have never had any one complain, most don't even ask what is covering the cake they just want a cool looking cake. Lets face it there are cakes that you would get from a patisserie and then there are sculptural cakes... different specie. There are many things that I don't find tasty but I don't insult the chefs that make them I just order something else and compared to some of the weird sience projects going on in the savory world I don't think fondant is particularly fake, the ingredients used appear in the everyday pastry world. Enough...

End of rant.

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Maybe the texture combined with the idea of mint flavor is what causes the association with chewing gum, try a plain version or something less suggestive of Doublemint.

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Is it the worst? No.

This, my friend, is where you and I disagree.

Just as long as you agree that it's only for the money. That's a principle that I can respect.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Is it the worst? No.

...Just as long as you agree that it's only for the money. That's a principle that I can respect.

You can flavor fondant in as many different ways as possible, the earth and the sky are the limit.

Fondant is for much much more than money or taste. It's not only a palette for art work it's a skin for building culinary masterpieces. It's a medium that can transform sugar into anything in the right hands, part of a tool box.

Umm, cake especially artsy cake mimicks life. Here today gone tomorrow. Was it pretty, was it memorable or regretable? For what is your life (cake) a vapor that appeareth for a little time and then vanisheth away.

I mean check the avatar for example. Fondant made that possible. This cake made lots of people happy in a variety of ways. Not to mention, it's filled with peanut butter mousse.

C'mon, what are Chuckie Taylors usually filled with, huh? :raz:


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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C'mon, what are Chuckie Taylors usually filled with, huh?  :raz:

I usually keep mine full of toe cheese.


Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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but why cover a cake in something that gets hard and gross and needs to be removed? ruins the cake.

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Has anyone ever made or used marshmallow fondant? 

I saw it on a thread( not on this site) about a Louis Vitton Cake.

To me, it looked like a better( and cheaper) alternative.

Oh, Kkkkk88888.... K8 has, in various incarnations....


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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but why cover a cake in something that gets hard and gross and needs to be removed? ruins the cake.

If you read my previous post, a decorator will cover a cake in fondant if the the type of decoration requested required it. Again, there are a lot of things you can't do with buttercream.

Also, if you are eating a cake with fondant that is HARD, then the cake is horribly old. Fondant will develop a light crusting on the outside of it when exposed to air, but it will remain moist and chewy on the inside next to the cake, just like some buttercreams crust over.

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Rolled fondant can be delicious or it can be incredibly nasty. Depends on the recipe used or the type purchased.

For anyone to condemn fondant as a whole unless they've tried all the different types, would be rather.................... unfair. Sort of like condemning chocolate as a whole after tasting an inferior chocolate product. There's good chocolate and bad chocolate with a whole range in between. Same with fondant.

Almost every fondant hater I've run into has been one of 3 types;

1. They're scared by it because they are unfamiliar with how to work with it.

2. The only kind they've tried is Wilton

3. They've read that it's nasty and never tried it themselves.

Good quality fondant put on a cake properly does not get hard. It is firm and slightly chewy but easy to cut through.

My advice to someone questioning fondant is try it your self and decide for yourself!

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Has anyone ever made or used marshmallow fondant? 

I saw it on a thread( not on this site) about a Louis Vitton Cake.

To me, it looked like a better( and cheaper) alternative.

Oh, Kkkkk88888.... K8 has, in various incarnations....

You rang??? :laugh:

This cake is my cake that I copied from the design of a brilliant however nameless decorator (oops, my bad) at the ICES 2002. And it is marshmallow fondant~~~viola la la. Hat, eyelashes, antennae, spots, everything, little spindly striped legs. Hey, see the feet look like circus peanuts??? I made those too because the ones I bought were all squished. But that's kinda what this tastes like--circus peanuts, flattened circus peanuts.

Here's a butt shot...of the cake, silly!!


Edited by K8memphis (log)

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I do both IMB and fondant , some fondant brands are better than others. Some things just don't work with buttercream, I don't think you can cut yourself off from using this, you'd also cut yourself off from business. It's my job to give the bride part of her dream ,that also happens to taste fantastic with or without buttercream.

I had a bride tell me she hated IMB, she wanted good old fashion 10X and white lard, It's her day and her cake!

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This is my first posting on this wonderful site. I have been browsing for several weeks on myriad topics, and I have decided to join. I have been reading a lot about fondant topics, especially concerning the topic of taste. While I agree that while fondant tastes like poo, it is a necessary evil for most of us.

That being said, I want to share a recipe that I found that actually tastes pretty good, especially if you flavor it with quality flavors. It is also vegetarian/vegan, I believe. I'm a 30-year vegetarian, and I swear I can taste the gelatin in the usual home made recipe. This is a moderately stiff fondant, and doesn't tear easily. I've had great success with it. I have only used tylose, so I can't tell you how the other gums work. And, of course, you can make as many pounds as you wish by multipying the basic recipe. I use my Kitchen aid stand mixer.

(Makes 2 1/2 pounds)

* 2 lbs. SIFTED confectioner's sugar

* 1/2 TABLESPOON CMC, Tylose, or gum tragacanth

* 1/2 cup glucose

* 1 TABLESPOON shortening

* Start with 6 TABLESPOONS very hot water (note: I

have used up to a full cup of water

depending on humidity, so use your own judgent,

but add water a little at a time.)

Microwave glucose and shortening together for a few seconds, just

enough to liquify, then mix well. In another bowl, mix well with

PADDLE ATTACHMENT the sugar and gum of your choice. Add

glucose and shortening mixture along with water a TABLESPOON AT

A TIME. Add more water in the same manner until you get "the

usual" consistancy of fondant YOU normally use. Knead well with

a little shortening on your hands and/or surface the way you

would normally until smooth. I don't refrigerate fondant, but

that's hot topic found elsewhere on this site.

I am really excited about being part of this great society. I'd like to send photos of some of my cakes when I have more time. Also, I would like to have employment with someone or team up with someone in the Atlanta area. My main forte is gumpaste anything. I have taken classes with the awe- inspiring Nick Lodge, and I love this medium. I have done a lot on my own, but I am a people person, and I love being with other like-minded cake artists creating sugar masterpieces. It's more fun that way, and you get a chance to learn from others, share, and support each other in a creative environment. I believe in delivering the highest quality you can deliver- gastronmically and aesthetically. But it's hard sometimes when you're all by yourself and you're under the stress of a deadline, to give yourself the support you need to get through-especially when something goes wrong or doesn't turn out as you'd liked. Also, you need many skills in cake decorating and it's rare that one person can be the best at everything.

Until next time, ciao~

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Lesa, Welcome to Egullet! Looks like a great recipe too.

Kate

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Hey hey... and hey. Alright, so this is pretty simple. My girlfriend's birthday was 2 days ago, and I wanted to do something special for her - not just some Betty Crocker out of the box. Her favorite cake is carrot cake, so I made a modified carrot cake which also included pineapple and golden raisins. She likes dolphins and ocean-y type things, so I decided to do a light marble on the outside and decorate it accordingly. This was my time ever working with fondant, but I'm actually relatively proud of it. The flowers were meant to be flowers, but also somewhat resemble seaweed (hence my not doing roses or tulips). Feel free to comment and so forth. I'd also like to hear if any of you have any experience (non-professionally) working with fondant or cakes and the like. Buon appetito!

<br><br>

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I've never eaten a Hot Pocket and thought "I'm glad I ate that."

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