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I am just knocked out by the beauty of everybody's efforts. I am definitely going with Rachel's method of treating the eggplant cutlet-style --it's apparent that no joke, you'd want to knosh those straight from the oven. Smithy, those pics are beautiful, and I adore those casseroles. Nullo's looks like it's very " happy tummy stuff"! I am glad I made mine, as well. DH took the leftovers with him for the other guys at the station tonight; we have 6-12" of snow coming in fast, and that always makes for busy time. The venison mixed with some pork sausage worked well.

It's quite funny about the cattle-sheep thing; I reckon what goes around, comes around--for these days, many cattle ranchers run sheep as well--to clear an alien invasive plant called leafy spurge--sheep can and will clear it up; cattle hate it for it burns their mouth (s?).

I used venison basically because I am needing to make freezer room for a piggy we are welcoming the end of this month--should be right about breakin' the Q- fasting time.Happy dance :smile:


Edited by Mabelline (log)

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Hi Susan--I was going on the informal theory that the low availability/selection of lamb here in San Diego was a combination of relative lack of ethnic groups that are heavily into lamb, and relative lack of interest in, for lack of a better term, "foodie-ism" around here. On the face of it, those theories wouldn't explain the easy availability of ground lamb in small-town FL ... except that I have been the Publix-chain stores down there, and I gotta say they pretty much kick the booty of any of the chains here in SD. Plus ... I dunno, on my few visits to the Daytona Beach area, I got the impression that the small-town Fl matrix around that area had an overlay of retirees from the Northeast--maybe markets down there have gotten a little into catering more to the ethnic-influenced food tastes of these snowbirds? Admittedly I'm now just wildly speculating on little data here...  :hmmm:

Thanks for the mini-side-discussion! You could very well be right about Publix, and possibly attempts to cater to the food tastes of the snowbirds. Maybe sometimes I don't give enough credit to Publix, where it is due. It really is a good chain. Not only do they carry lamb in various cuts including ground, but they carry duck, goose, and quail! It's better than grocery shopping was for us in Delaware.

Speaking of Delaware, wow NulloModo, that looks GOOD!


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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Mabelline, did you manage to take photos before the leftovers went away? I'm really enjoying seeing everyone's photos. I've decided not to bother with the stovetop moussaka I was going to make with my other eggplants; they're just begging to be made into Rachel's cutlets.

I've been thinking venison would work well here too, but I was too lazy to grind any.

Edited to add: Mabelline, if it isn't too far off-topic, can you tell me how the ranchers are keeping the sheep together? I thought that was the reason for the fencing.


Edited by Smithy (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Smithy, I have still not figured my little digital camera out yet in order to post photos, but it's funny, the other day I determined to seriously apply myself to read up and try all the advice from the eG tutorial about photos (where is the ashamed hang your head-down emoticon when you need it?). But I shall have some photo montages when I gather up all my ducks and get them goose-stepping.

No, I sure didn't take pictures of my effort, but it was mostly because I am staying off my leg.

You were pretty much right on about your perception about the old days and sheepraising. A lot of the animosity had deeper underlying causes, such as the 'bobwire', sectioning off open-range, land-grabbing by the bigtime outfits, small landholders trying to raise something the bigtime outfits bruited as range destroyers--browse feeders versus grazers.

Nowadays, for the most part, most of the land's spoken for, or leased, and if not actually fenced, you are in deep trouble if you attempt to use anyone's without paying in one of several ways. Trying to not go severely offtopic and although my answer is simplistic...the folks I spoke about will run sheep and cattle in different areas at different times. There is no longer an onus attached to raisin' woolies.

I'll pm you if you want me to. Oh, one last question: are your casseroles old ? They are beauties.

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Heh heh. The lamb problem. I ran into that with the other cook-off. I really want to do this one but will probably go for a beef substitute. It might be a cultural bias. Not so many years ago the monastery near the country place ran some sheep as well as the cattle. When we would go visit (they were all friends) my dad would mutter under his breath "(expletive deleted) prairie maggots."

It is only in the past few years that finding lamb here was possible at all, except for a few specialty shops. I remember that my dad wouldn't let it in the house. A lot of his buddies that also served in the South Pacific during WWII got fed a lot of mutton. He never touched anything that ever went BAAAA again. Then we started seeing more immigrants that have lamb as part of their cooking heritage. I only ran into moussaka at the one Greek restaurant here (then) about 20 years ago.

Now, this is not a dish I eat that often but I don't recall ever having it with potatoes in it. Odd.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Now, this is not a dish I eat that often but I don't recall ever having it with potatoes in it. Odd.

Virtually all of the Greek restaurants and Greek diners in the NY Tri-state area serve it with potatoes in it. It might be a New York thing, but its definitely authentic to several parts of Greece including Macedonia.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I made my moussaka for our supper tonight. Instead of salting and frying up the sliced eggplant, I followed Rachel's recipe for eggplant cutlets. I will echo the fact that it is hard not to gobble them up as they wait to be put into the moussaka.

gallery_13838_1102_16849.jpg

I wanted to use ground bison, but the family wanted lamb as is our tradition. Couldn't find any ground lamb so I used 8 shoulder llamb chops, trimed and ground it myself. I used 2 large tomatoes, chopped red onion, parsley, and garlic, tomato sauce, red wine, nutmeg, cinnamon, ground coriander, cumin salt and pepper.

gallery_13838_1102_19221.jpg

The filling was really good! I used a combination of grated parmesan and leftover feta in the cheese layer. The bechamel sauce had butter, milk, cream and 3 egg yolks.

gallery_13838_1102_9434.jpg

The house smelled pretty good while it was baking! I kept peeking to make sure the top was browning.

gallery_13838_1102_19.jpg

As sides, I cut up some turnip into thin slices, doused them with evoo, some salt, Cajun seasoning and baked them along with the moussaka. We pretended they were fries. :rolleyes: Also had some asparagus and a salad with feta and balsamic dressing.

gallery_13838_1102_7748.jpg

Here is a close up of the moussaka. I think it could have used a little more sauce, but the flavour was great! :biggrin: I am happy that I made the eggplant cutlets.

The recipe was a combination of suggestions here, an old book called Eastern Mediterranean Cooking by Roger Basque, and a book called Winners by a group of bridge players in Calgary, Alberta. And, because I love mint with lamb, I had lots of fresh mint with mine!

gallery_13838_1102_4536.jpg

Thanks for jogging my memory to make this dish again!


Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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I wonder if the lack of availability of lamb in San Diego is a holdover from the old Range Wars.  I wouldn't have expected that to apply down there, but I know it was tough to find lamb in central California when I was growing up because of generations-old hard feelings.  This may also be a factor in Texas, that staunch cattle-growing state.  Fifi, what do you think?

For those of you who don't know, there was quite a prolonged land use argument - I think starting in the late 1800's and going into the early 1900's - between the cattle ranchers and sheep herders of the West.  As I understand it, the principle issues were the presence or absence of fences (cattle ranchers didn't want them, sheep ranchers did) and the incompatable grazing methods of the two animals.  My grandfather, who never raised either cattle or sheep, nonetheless took the side of the cattle ranchers.  To his dying day, he wouldn't eat sheep in any form.

well, not fifi here :wink: but as another Texan i can say we have a lot of lamb available in the Austin area, all year round. legs, shoulders occasionally (which are a damn good deal, last one i got was .99/lb), chops and frenched. used to be more imported NZ lamb, but the TX lamb has taken over the majority of the market in the last year or so in this area.

for ground lamb, personally i prefer to buy a leg o' lamb, or a half leg, and grind it myself in food processor. but then i've started doing that with all meat i want ground and have to say we really appreciate the difference. :wub:

now i just have to get a little leg to use for some moussaka. so hungry for it after reading through this cook-off.


Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

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The fact that it is more generally available in Austin is really interesting, Judith. But then, Austin is a "whole 'nother country." :biggrin: I have yet to find shoulder here even in the well stocked groceries like a big HEB. I suppose I could go into the city to a Whole Foods or Central Market but that is a bit of a trek.

I am sold on the eggplant cutlets a la Rachel. I may do that just to eat the cutlets and skip the moussaka altogether. :laugh: It kind of reminds me of my recipe for oven fried eggplant. The stuff is worse than potato chips.

Currently I am suffering from cheese confusion. Help.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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OK, I'm a little late to the party but I'm here!

I'm definitely going to make the version I alluded to in my earlier post but I just managed to borrow a mandoline yesterday. I've got all of the ingredients ready and will do it tonight or tomorrow.

I have been thinking about possible problems with this method and have come to the conclusion to take my cue directly from what I remember having at the restaurant. Translation: "that's really good, but kinda skimpy". I think that if I pile the veggies, meat mixture, and then bechamel too high the vegetables may not cook the way I want them to (which is just beyond al dente, but still with some texture) or it will take too long and start to burn around the edges. So smaller layers will probably work in my favor.

I'll keep you posted...


aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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.... Oh, one last question: are your casseroles old ? They are beauties.

Thanks. They aren't old at all; I bought them in Luxor, Egypt sometime in the last 5 years. I think they're an old tradition, though. More than once, my husband has gotten excited about finding old broken pots out in the desert, taken detailed notes on them, only to find the exact pots (unbroken) in the souks in town! :laugh: (Potsherds are not his area of expertise.)

It's really fun to see all the different takes on moussaka in this cook-off, and they all look delicious. Even this early in the morning, I'm thinking about getting into my leftovers.

Fifi, with regard to the cheese, I think it's as personal as the cook. I don't recall ever having something as tangy as feta with the moussaka I had in Greece, long long ago, nor in Greek restaurants since. In Egypt they don't use cheese at all. I've been happiest with a combination of cheddar and fontina (most untraditional) in my bechamel sauce. I've never heard of parmesan in moussaka before now either, but with my fontina I'm hardly going to knock it. We know parmesan cheese and eggplant go well together. I think you need to pick what you like and call it "Texas-style Moussaka". :laugh:

Edited to add: I just checked my old copy of "Classic Greek Cooking" (1974, Nitty Gritty Productions) and it lists parmesan cheese for its sauce. So much for my memory! They use these proportions in their moussaka sauce: 1/4c. butter, 2T flour, 2c. milk, 4 eggs, 1/2c. Parmesan cheese, 1/2 tsp salt, dash of pepper.

They also puts eggs in their meat sauce.


Edited by Smithy (log)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I still have lot of leftovers from my first round of Moussaka, but I am already thinking about a potential second batch.

'The Smoked Joint', a BBQ place in Philly which has been gettings lots of attention on the local eG board lately, serves up a smoked eggplant babbaganoush as one of their apps. I'm wondering if I could do a smokey Moussaka somehow.

I could toss a small pork shoulder and the eggplant slices into the smoker, and maybe use a dry rub with some of the moussaka spices on the pork, the cinnamon, coriander, oregano, etc. I could always use smoked gouda for cheese, but that might just be smoke overload, perhaps something really tangy to cut the smoke flavor might be good for the cheese there. Then again, maybe the whole idea is too bizarre.


He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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NulloModo:

Your idea sounds interesting but there may be a couple of hurdles for you to overcome. The first is getting any smoke character into the eggplant slices via the smoker- they probably won't be in there too long before getting too mushy, and there is no fat (I find that lean meats or non-oily fish don't smoke up too well.) Maybe you could poke the slices with a fork and rub some olive oil onto them, penetrating the holes.

I've been trying to perfect my babaghanous recipe over the past few months and I'll tell you that you don't need a smoker to get a really smoky characteristic into the eggplant. But you also wind up with an amorphous blob when you're done, not suitable for a casserole. You may have to settle for slightly smoky slices, and derive a lot of that flavor from the pork.

Also- make sure your cheese is genuinely smoked. Some brands just take regular cheese and apply liquid smoke to the outside, which could lend a bit of harshness.

Other than that, go for it- and good luck!


aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

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Here's mine. I had a feeling that this will not be well-received. DH hated the cheese (Romano...coz the only cheese he'll take is cheddar and cream cheese). DD#2 doesn't dig the eggplants. Sigh. Made with beef. I salted and drained the eggplants, then pan-fried. Personally, I thought it was good. :sad:

gallery_12248_1112_77539.jpg


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Doesn't like Romano? What's wrong with him?

It looks pretty darn tasty to me.


He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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I kid you not! He says it smells like puke! :sad:


TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Some aged cheeses like romano, or parm have sort of a vomity smell. I've noticed that the smell comes out even stronger when the cheese has been heated up in some sort of sauce.


Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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I won't have time to make this till the weekend either. The best Moussaka I've had was round the corner from where I live in London, a Greek Cypriot place called Tziakos (pronounced Chackos) It used to be run by a couple of old ladies and had decades of nic-nacs, farm implements, tobacco smoke festooned around the walls and ceiling. The thing to have was mixed metzes for about £8 ($12) There were umpteen delicious courses. The final course was a large piece of kleftico lamb which was usually impossible to actually eat. They were very good about putting it in a take-away container for you to have the next day. Among all these courses was moussaka. It was very solid with straight sides. I don't think there was any cheese in the bechemel sauce. I don't remember potato, just thick cut aubergine that left that metalic colour that aubergine imparts on the bechemel sauce. They didn't make it with raw minced lamb they used cooked lamb chopped up. Probably from all the klefticos people didn't eat.

Once they served one that was a tiny bit mouldy, but it was so damn tasty I just cut the mould off and ate the rest!

Anyway, that's what I'm going to try and reproduce, but without the mould.

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Dant, now you've got me cracking open my Greek cookbook and drooling, and wondering when I can cook some of its other recipes. Your description sounds delicious, so don't disappoint us! My cookbook, by the way, is "Classic Greek Cooking", 1974, and it lists three recipes for moussaka: Eggplant Moussaka, Zucchini Moussaka (just a variation on the eggplant) and Beef and Potato Moussaka. I have to wonder why it took me so darned long to clue in that moussaka is just a layered baked dish.

I noted in an edit to a previous post, but I'll say it again here, that this book calls for Parmesan cheese in its moussaka sauces. I hadn't remembered that. I wonder why my other cookbooks call for cheddar? I still think it's pretty much up to the cook.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Quick question??? How many of youall slice, salt, then rise and drain your eggies?

... I also only buy what I've been told were male eggplants (no indentation at the base) bc they supposedly have fewer seeds. Anecdotal evidence, always tricky, bears out the effectiveness of these two techniques, but I'd be interested to know what people think.

Shouldn't male aubergines contain NO seeds??

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The quest for ground lamb continues. I came close two different times today, but as they say, "close" only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades. :biggrin: At least I'm getting to explore some interesting stores I had not checked out previously. Rather than burden this topic with the details of these slightly off-topic adventures, I think I'll start a whole other topic in the California forum or something. But suffice it to say here: one of the shops actually yielded up a packet of that seven-spice mixture featured in Rachel Perlow's recipe; and the other place, a for-reals butcher shop, said they'd have some freshly-ground lamb in tomorrow. So I am closing in on my prey ... :rolleyes:

Yeah, I know I can make this dish with ground beef. But where's the fun in that? Besides, by this point my Quest for Lamb has taken on the aura of a Sacred Food-Geek Mission! I shall not be denied!! I shall yet succeed in making my neighborhood safe for lovers of fresh-ground lamb everywhere!!! :laugh:

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The quest for ground lamb continues. I came close two different times today, but as they say, "close" only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades. :biggrin: At least I'm getting to explore some interesting stores I had not checked out previously. Rather than burden this topic with the details of these slightly off-topic adventures, I think I'll start a whole other topic in the California forum or something. But suffice it to say here: one of the shops actually yielded up a packet of that seven-spice mixture featured in Rachel Perlow's recipe; and the other place, a for-reals butcher shop, said they'd have some freshly-ground lamb in tomorrow. So I am closing in on my prey ... :rolleyes:

Yeah, I know I can make this dish with ground beef. But where's the fun in that? Besides, by this point my Quest for Lamb has taken on the aura of a Sacred Food-Geek Mission! I shall not be denied!! I shall yet succeed in making my neighborhood safe for lovers of fresh-ground lamb everywhere!!! :laugh:

You go girl, we are behind you all the way!

(I love your attitude!)


Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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'The Smoked Joint', a BBQ place in Philly which has been gettings lots of attention on the local eG board lately, serves up a smoked eggplant babbaganoush as one of their apps.  I'm wondering if I could do a smokey Moussaka somehow.

When I'm doing moussaka or "eggplant lasagna", I tend to lightly oil my eggplant and then cook them outside on the grill. While it doesn't have that true smoked flavor of smoked meats, it does pick up that unmistakable grilled/smoked flavor. It's my favorite way of precooking eggplant, and if I get my act together and join in this cookoff, it's how I'm going to be doing the eggplant.

Marcia.


Don't forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted...he lived happily ever after. -- Willy Wonka

eGullet foodblog

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moussaka for dinner tonight - and john enjoyed it.

a mix of the Recipezaar and rosemary barron recipes heavily modified since johnnybird will not eat lamb and i don't care for aubergines.

2 small zucchini sliced on the bias

2 russet potatoes boiled with the skins on

meat layer

olive oil

1 chopped onion

4 cloves garlic sliced

1 lb ground buffalo

1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp allspice

1 1/2 Tbsp oregano

1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley

1/4 cup tomato paste

1 tomato peeled and chopped

1 1/2 cups beef broth

salt and pepper

topping

2 1/3 Tbsp butter

2 1/3 Tbsp flour

1 cup milk

1 tsp grated nutmeg

1 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

2 eggs, lightly beaten

white pepper

scrub the potatoes and then boil for 30 minutes in the jackets. drain, run under cold water then set aside.

saute the onions in the olive oil. add garlic then meat. cook till no longer red

add the spices and cook about 1 minute. add tomato paste, beef broth, tomato and salt and pepper. bring to a boil then turn down and simmer for 30-45 minutes.

turn oven to 350F.

grease a casserole dish. peel potatoes and thinly slice. place in casserole dish. sprinkle lightly with salt. top with meat layer. top with the zucchini.

make bechemel by melting butter, add flour and cook, stirring for one minute. stir milkin and cook on medium until thick. add nutmeg. remove from heat and stir in eggs then cheese. add white pepper to taste.

bake for one hour, rotating halfway through.

we served with a radish and cucumber salad


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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The quest for ground lamb continues. I came close two different times today, but as they say, "close" only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades. :biggrin: At least I'm getting to explore some interesting stores I had not checked out previously. Rather than burden this topic with the details of these slightly off-topic adventures, I think I'll start a whole other topic in the California forum or something. But suffice it to say here: one of the shops actually yielded up a packet of that seven-spice mixture featured in Rachel Perlow's recipe; and the other place, a for-reals butcher shop, said they'd have some freshly-ground lamb in tomorrow. So I am closing in on my prey ... :rolleyes:

Yeah, I know I can make this dish with ground beef. But where's the fun in that? Besides, by this point my Quest for Lamb has taken on the aura of a Sacred Food-Geek Mission! I shall not be denied!! I shall yet succeed in making my neighborhood safe for lovers of fresh-ground lamb everywhere!!! :laugh:

miz- wish i could send you some(especially since the johnnybird won't eat it and he's around for a bit now :angry: ). i'm lucky to have a local butcher (open weds-sat to the public) who will freshly grind whatever lamb i need - happily and with a big smile.... guess that makes up for the freakin traffic around here - and trying to get in or out of their parking lot.


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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    • By David Ross
      Hello friends and welcome back to a time-honored tradition--the popular eG Cook-Off Series. We're in the heat of summer right now and our gardens are literally blooming with all manner of peak of the season ripe fruits and succulent vegetables. And there's no better time of year to honor a vegetable that is often maligned as not being as colorful or trendy as the chi-chi breakfast radish or the multi-hued rainbow chard.

      In addition to not always being recognized for it's looks, every August and September it becomes the butt of jokes at State Fair competitions across the country. If you can get past the embarassment of seeing the poor devils dressed up and carved into silly, cartoon-like farm figures or pumped-up with organic steroids, you'll find a delicious, low-calorie vegetable packed with potassium and vitamin A. Yes friends, your dreams have come true for today we kick-off eG Cook-Off #62, "Summer Squash."
      (Click here http://forums.egulle...cook-off-index/ for the complete eG Cook-Off Index).

      According to the University of Illinois Extension Office, summer squash, (also known in some circles as Italian marrow), are tender, warm-season vegetables that can be grown anytime during the warm, frost-free season. Summer squash differs from fall and winter squash, (like pumpkins, acorn and butternut squash), because it is harvested before the outer rind hardens. Some of the most popular summer squash are the Green and Yellow Zucchini, Scallop, Patty Pan, Globe, Butter Blossom and Yellow Crookneck.

      My personal favorite summer squash is the versatile zucchini. Slow-cooked with sliced onion and ham hock, zucchini is perfectly comfortable nestled on a plate next to juicy, fried pork chops and creamy macaroni and cheese. But the chi-chi haute crowd isn't forgotten when it comes to zucchini, or, as the sniffy French call it, the "courgette." Tiny, spring courgette blossoms stuffed with herbs and ricotta cheese then dipped in tempura batter and gently fried are a delicacy found on Michelin-Star menus across the globe.

      Won't you please join me in crafting some delicious masterpieces that showcase the culinary possibilities of delicious summer squash.
    • By David Ross
      Welcome back to our reknowned eGullet Cook-Off Series. Our last Cook-Off, Bolognese Sauce, led to a spirited discussion over the intricacies of the beloved Italian meat sauce. Click here for the complete eG Cook-Off Index. Today we’re launching eGullet Cook-Off 58: Hash, the classic American diner dish.
      Yet what appears as a humble, one-name dish is anything but ordinary. The difficulty in defining “Hash” is exactly why we’ve chosen it for a Cook-Off—simple definitions don’t apply when one considers that Hash is a dish that transcends regional and international boundaries. The ingredients one chooses to put into their version of Hash are limitless--we aren’t just talking cold meat and leftover potatoes folks.
      I for one, always thought Hash came out of a can from our friends at Hormel Foods, (as in "Mary Kitchen" Corned Beef Hash). It looks like Alpo when you scoop it out of the can, but it sure fries up nice and crispy. After a few weeks of research in the kitchen, I’ve experienced a new appreciation for Hash.
      So start putting together the fixins for your Hash and let’s start cooking. Hash, it’s what’s for breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner.
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