Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.

For our seventh Cook-Off, due to an overwhelming campaign by a lurking group of Greek cuisine fans, we're going to be making mousssaka. And listen up: y'all have some work to do!

When it comes to moussaka, it's all Greek to me! :raz: I cannot find a single solid lead on an eGullet thread concerning moussaka. In addition, I cannot find a recipe for moussaka in RecipeGullet. Finally, I've never had nor cooked this dish, and the only cookbook I have that includes it (our own Paula Wolfert's great book on The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean) is explicitly non-traditional.

So, as in any decent democracy in the wake of a power-shift, the reigns must now be handed over to you, my moussaka-loving friends, to guide us through the pleasures of this fine dish. Tell us, what exactly is it? What produced your eager advocacy? How does it address the cook-off criteria? What are its classic forms? What links might guide us? What recipes do you use? What techniques can we learn?

Info! Photos! Opinions! Sing, Goddesses!!

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mousakka is fundamentally, a layered casserole dish similar to shepherd's pie. At the bottom, you have par-cooked sliced potatoes, then sauteed or fried slices of eggplant, then ground meat (browned with chopped onion and seasoned with Greek seasonings, allspice and/or cinnamon, sometimes cooked with a little tomato paste or tomato sauce), and then you have a thick bechemel made with a sharp cheese (like parmesan) that is poured over the top, and then the entire casserole baked.

There is a great deal of variation on this dish, as it exists in Turkish, Greek, and Middle Eastern cultures, some even involve tomato sauce being poured over the top. In fact some don't use eggplant at all, you can substitute Zucchini even.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to post
Share on other sites

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moussaka

There is no hard and fast authentic recipe because there is such tremendous variation. But here's a couple to start:

http://www.greek-recipe.com/modules.php?na...file=article167 (This one looks really good if you can find all the components)

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/472/...saka50284.shtml

http://www.recipezaar.com/35630

http://pieria.spark.net.gr/etimes/moussaka.htm

http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,1618,153190-251193,00.html

http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,1618,152189-255194,00.html

http://www.premiersystems.com/recipes/moussaka.html

Notice that some of these recipes call for potatoes as one of the layers, some do not. I happen to prefer the ones with potatoes, so certainly you can choose to add them or not.

The Turkish/Balkan versions are usually not as complicated as the Greek ones, as they usually omit the custard/bechemel/cheese layer at the top and don't heavily spice it as much.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to post
Share on other sites
Finally, I've never had nor cooked this dish, and the only cookbook I have that includes it (our own Paula Wolfert's great book on The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean) is explicitly non-traditional.

Just to clear the playing fields before you begin:

Moussaka is Greek, Cypriot and Balkan. My version, described as Balkan in the book, is lesser known but it is traditional to parts of Eastern Macedonia.

Mussaka is made in Jordan, Lebanon,Syria and Turkey. It does not include the bechamel or yogurt topping.

Sounds like a lot of fun.

Edited by Wolfert (log)

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mussaka is also made in Egypt. It doesn't include potatoes or bechamel sauce, although I usually add the bechamel anyway.

Thanks, Chris! I think this changes my cooking plans for the weekend. :biggrin:

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made David Rosengarten's version in his book, TASTE, a few years ago. It was very good, but there were quite a lot of steps and it was time-consuming. I've love to learn a quicker method, if there is one. We liked it a lot, but it involves a hunk of time that I don't usually have. Addtitionally, his recipe serves 15. I halved it when I made it, but if anyone needs a good recipe for a dinner party, this would fit the bill.

Stop Family Violence

Link to post
Share on other sites
Moussaka is Greek, Cypriot and Balkan. My version, described as Balkan in the book, is lesser known but it is traditional to parts of Eastern Macedonia.

Mussaka is made in Jordan, Lebanon,Syria and Turkey. It does not  include the bechamel or yogurt topping.

Thanks, Paula, for clarifying my post!

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me start by saying that Jason likes potato in it, I don't. But the last few times I've made it with the potatoes to please my man. :raz: The first recipe I ever used to make moussaka is Dinah Shore's recipe in Dom Deluise's Eat This! It'll Make You Feel Better, currently out of print, so you'll have to check your local library. I found a recipe online labeled as Dinah Shore's Moussaka (Greek Eggplant) and Meat, but I can't find my copy of Eat This! to make sure it is the same. No potatoes in this recipe, but feel free to add a layer or two.

As for the eggplant, I find it easier, quicker and less greasy to bake the eggplant, rather than frying the slices. Here is a link to my Eggplant Cutlets recipe on RecipeGullet. These eggplant cutlets are perfect for Moussaka or Eggplant Parmesan, or as a side dish on their own. I have to make extra because Jason'll eat them staight off the pan. :wink:

As for the Bechamel sauce, I've got that down easy with my new VitaMix:

It is excellent for making bechamel/cheese sauces. Heat the milk in the microwave for a head start (or not), blend with the flour for a couple minutes -- you can hear the difference when it starts to thicken. Add some butter, S&P, and cheese and blend some more. Perfect perfect cheese sauce without having to pre-grate the cheese. No lumps, no standing over a pot stirring or whisking to keep it smooth and from burning on the bottom.

Finally, let me say that if you don't have a crowd to cook for, Moussaka freezes beautifully. Get some small containers for individual portions (bake in a large pan, cut out individual portions to freeze in those containers) or family meal sized portions, for us, that would be about a loaf pan. I recently picked up some extra loaf pans at a restaurant's going out of business liquidation, so I may just use some of those for adding to the freezer larder.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, wonderful. I love moussaka! The best one I ever made is from Rosemary Barron's book Flavors of Greece. The meat sauce is heavenly spiced with cinnamon, allspice, honey and oregano, and the bechamel has 3 different cheeses stirred into it. Lovely..

I also remember making papoutsakia once for a dinner party, which is basically the same recipe but instead of in a baking dish, it's baked in halved aubergine shells. (Papoutsakia means little shoe or little slipper, something like that.) Looks very pretty (I find that large baked dishes of the shepherd's pie/moussaka kind, can look a bit dull even if they taste fantastic).

Edited by Chufi (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

The moussaka from the New York Times International Cookbook was a classic of my mom's dinner table growing up. Lamb, eggplant, potato, tomato, bechamel, oh it was good.

I actually often make a Lebanese appetizer dish referred to as moussaka. You can find the recipe in Annisa Helou's Lebanese Cuisine.

Basically you make a tomato sauce with onion, chickpeas and spices. You get baby eggplants (peel in stripes), briefly fry them whole, then add to the sauce to simmer. Fan the eggplants in a serving platter and spoon the tomato-chickpea sauce between the eggplants.

It is a lovely presentation and so good!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh, wonderful. I love moussaka! The best one I ever made is from Rosemary Barron's book Flavors of Greece.  The meat sauce is heavenly spiced with cinnamon, allspice, honey and oregano, and the bechamel has 3 different cheeses stirred into it. Lovely..

I have also made this version and liked it very much. I think her information on lightening the bechamel with beaten eggs is excellent, especially for such a rich dish.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Quick follow-up on the different types of moussaka, from a trusted, expert source. Another major different between recipes involves whether or not there's meat. "Mussaka" or "mussaqqa" (Arabic to English transliteration requires flexibility, of course) is a mixed combination of chickpeas, zucchini or eggplant and tomatoes that doesn't usually include meat of any kind.

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in. I have never even eaten Moussaka, let alone make it, so this will be a fun experience. I checked out most of the recipes you all so kindly linked or mentioned, and this one from Recipe Zaar that Jason linked looks mighty good to me. I will be one of those who uses zucchini instead of eggplant, and will include potatoes. (I love Shepherd's Pie.)

I also have a cookbook called Traditional Greek Cooking, given to me by our Danish family after they vacationed in Greece. Its recipe looks good, as well. It calls for frying the potato slices before layering them in the pan.

Obviously this is basically a one dish meal. Do you all serve a (Greek?) salad with it?

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to pass on this one because for some odd reason despite the fact that I love eggplant it makes me vomit... :blink:

I noticed that Jason said you could do it with zucchini instead so I think I will try it this way. I have never eatent his dish is my life..... :shock:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't done this yet, but...

There is a Turkish Restaurant near my parents' house on Long Island (Wild Fig in Glen Cove) that does an interesting take on moussaka that I have been meaning to duplicate. The interesting part is that they use both eggplant and zucchini, but do not pre-cook the slices. Instead they are sliced very thinly on a mandoline and placed in alternating layers in the casserole, which is then topped with the meat mixture and bechamel. The thin slicing eliminates the need to precook the veggies, and it's a fairly light and elegant presentation.

Again- I haven't tried this yet, so there may be complications that I am unaware of, but still...how hard can it be? This may be the nudge I've needed to give it a shot.

aka Michael

Chi mangia bene, vive bene!

"...And bring us the finest food you've got, stuffed with the second finest."

"Excellent, sir. Lobster stuffed with tacos."

Link to post
Share on other sites

i'm gonna have to stop by my old work place. my first job was at a greek restaurant which was owned by a family friend. haven't been in a while. i'll go back and look up there moussaka (or mousse kaka) recipe and share it

bork bork bork

Link to post
Share on other sites

The best Moussaka I have ever had was from one of the worst diners in the area. My friends and I would usually go (drunk out of our minds) because they served an ultra-cheap 24 hour a day breakfast, and they had a 'sausage' there that came out nuclear red and if you stared at it long enough looking almost like it was breathing... (don't ask, it is appealing when drunk out of your mind).

Still, their Moussaka reigns supreme. Perhaps I will have to go back before I cook this one to get a good idea of what I am going after.

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Link to post
Share on other sites
I also remember making papoutsakia once for a dinner party, which is basically the same recipe but instead of in a baking dish, it's baked in halved aubergine shells.

Imagine making this as an apetizer in those teensy little asian egg-sized eggplants!!!

Do you suffer from Acute Culinary Syndrome? Maybe it's time to get help...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah! This is lovely!

One of my best friends from college days was, IIRC, a first-generation American of Macedonian heritage--his family lived in the St. Louis area, where I was given to understand there's a sizeable Macedonian emigre community. He made moussaka for me once--his version, learned from his mother, did have the bechamel topping, plus potatoes in addition to eggplant. I guess there must be different styles of moussaka in different regions of Macedonia...

He also taught me that it's pronounced with the accent on the third syllable. Up to that point I was saying it with the accent on the second syllable, which is how I heard it pronounced by diner waitresses when I was growing up in the suburbs of New York.

Maybe I'll get ambitious and drop my old college friend an email to get the specifics of his family recipe...

Edited by mizducky (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
The first recipe I ever used to make moussaka is Dinah Shore's recipe in Dom Deluise's Eat This! It'll Make You Feel Better, currently out of print, so you'll have to check your local library. I found a recipe online labeled as Dinah Shore's Moussaka (Greek Eggplant) and Meat, but I can't find my copy of Eat This! to make sure it is the same. No potatoes in this recipe, but feel free to add a layer or two.

If memory serves me correctly, Craig Claiborne's Best of NY has Dinah Shore's moussaka recipe. It used bread crumbs. I made it once and was pretty disappointed in it.

In Minneapolis, It's Greek to Me serves a moussaka which I found to be wonderful. I have mimicked their dish as follows:

Meat Mixture:

2 lbs Ground Lamb (or very lean hamburger)

1/2 C Red Wine

1/2 C finely diced onion

1-2 TBSP Tomato Paste

Salt, Pepper, Cinnamon, Allspice to taste

Brown meat and onions, add tomato paste and red wine, cinnamon, black pepper and allspice, reduce.

Salt to taste.

Eggplant

3-4 Dark purple eggplant sliced in rounds with skin on. Sprinkle liberally with salt and let drain in colander for 1 hour with a plated weight on them.

Rinse thoroughly and pat dry.

Heat olive oil on hot griddle and griddle the slices until brown on one side and then turn one time and brown the other side. Keep olive oil layer light as eggplant will soak up as much as you put on. Set aside.

Slice potatoes with or without skin in 1/8" slices. Griddle them till browned on both sides. Set aside.

Bechamel Sauce

Any recipe for bechamel sauce will work, but I start with a roux, to which I slowly add heated 2% milk while stirring. I like to keep my bechamel rather thick. I add 3 egg yolks to the sauce (beat the egg yolks in small dish, add some of the hot bechamel and stir, then add back into the bechamel) and parmesan cheese and a little salt. Don't forget to add freshly grated nutmeg to the bechamel. It is very important to the moussaka taste.

Baking

Layer the potatoes first in bottom of lasagna pan which has been oiled first.

Then the meat mixture.

Then layer the eggplant slices.

Top with the bechamel.

Bake at 350 until lightly browned on top.

Let sit after taking out of the oven for at least 15-20 minutes to "set up".

Slice and enjoy. It does freeze very well.

doc

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rereading the Dinah Shore recipe, the main variation is that ricotta cheese is added to the bechamel. Opinions on this?

re: Ground Lamb -- I'm finding it very hard to procure. I needed some last week when I made gyro, and I had to buy shoulder chops and debone and grind them myself. I'm going to call some semi-local butchers to see what they have. I spoke with a butcher at Pathmark Supermarket and they said they aren't allowed to ground lamb for customers, only beef. The only way they can sell ground lamb is if it comes boxed. Same for pork. They have to keep their grinding machine beef only. He suggested ShopRite, but I suspect it is a similar story there, as they wouldn't grind the chops I bought there either. He said it's bad for the customers and the butchers because the stores need fewer "meat men" -- only the store's bottom line benefits.

Follow-up: I called the butchers and they have ground lamb in frozen 1 lb packages, patties or not. One has it for $2.99/lb (Oradell Prime Meats, Oradell, NJ), the other for $3.80/lb (United Meat Market, New Milford, NJ). Both of these prices are less than I paid for shoulder chops (again that I had to debone and grind in my food processer) at a supermarket (ShopRite $3.99/lb). Moral: Patronize your independant butcher for the lamb.

Edited by Rachel Perlow (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have sent Devoted Sweet Husband for eggplants. I hope he remembers what he's been tutored about such. Am hobbling around after having a horse skid to a halt and plop down with my right leg under him---major bummer since I only get to ride a few times a year. But no matter. I am thinking of using some thinly sliced cabbage as a potato substitute.

Quick question??? How many of youall slice, salt, then rise and drain your eggies?

Aw, I forgot to mention that I'll be using ground venison with spicy sausage mixed in for a lamb sub as well. I find it can have the same mouthfeel if you pay attention to your mixing.

Edited by Mabelline (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quick question??? How many of youall slice, salt, then rise and drain your eggies?

Yes, let's figure this out! I slice, salt, wait, then dab with paper towels. I also only buy what I've been told were male eggplants (no indentation at the base) bc they supposedly have fewer seeds. Anecdotal evidence, always tricky, bears out the effectiveness of these two techniques, but I'd be interested to know what people think.

Just checked the new McGee, and he says that the salting reduces the absorptiveness of eggplant, but as far as reducing bitterness, that probably just reduces "our perception of the alkaloids." I dunno what that means and have to take the dog for a walk, but if someone out there can explain, that'd be swell!

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rachel, I have a copy of "EAT THIS..." . Dinah Shore's recipe that you linked to is the same one that is in the book.

"My only regret in life is that I did not drink more Champagne."

John Maynard Keynes

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our fourteenth Cook-Off, we're making bibimbap.

      Aficionados of Korean food and cooking are well aware of this famous dish, but many who have not had the pleasure might find this a surprising cook-off selection. Folks, I'm here to tell you that everyone should bring this remarkable dish into their repertoire.
      What is bibimbap, you ask? In a previous thread devoted to the subject, Jinmyo offered this typically inimitable explanation:
      True, some ingredients (the pickles known as kimchee and the red pepper paste known as gojuchang) may be a bit tricky for you to find, but we can summon up some possible substitutes. No special equipment is absolutely necessary, though if you have one of the stone or metal cook bowls known as dolsots, you'll want to use that. Like cassoulet, bibimbap inspires many debates about authenticity and regionalism, which means that the neophyte can experiment with great flexibility and still claim some amount of technical merit!
      Finally and as always, the eGullet Society is chock-a-block full of experts ready to share ideas and recipes for the various components of this dish, not only on the thread referenced above (click the little pink box in the quotation) but also here, here, and here, with a kimchee thread here and a kochuchang thread here. So turn on your rice cookers and get your beef a-marinating -- and if you have any soju handy, get it damned cold!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...