Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Terrine Topic


Recommended Posts

  • 1 month later...

Beaver pate en croute:


beaver pate.jpg

The pastry was not one of my best; I think the flour was old and I had to add too much water to make it workable. Also, my only pate mold is a nonstick, and I've never gotten the sides to brown as well as I feel they should, in both a commercial and a home oven. Would an ordinary tinned steel mold make a difference?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

^ Consider greasing the mold with butter and cook at a higher temp (425F) for the first 40-60 minutes, rotating half-way through. Then lower the temp.

Rabbit in Riesling, with carrots, mustard and mint.

Rabbits simmered in Riesling with orange and yellow carrots, set with gelatin, loins down the middle, finished with mustard seeds and mint.

9096162299_247d6e2bd3_z.jpg

Chicken Galantine with confit gizzards, Sicilian pistachios and stuffed morels.

Ventrèche, green peppercorns, tarragon, lemon and star anise.

9096212749_5b1dd537b6_z.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally have a blog post about the making of that pheasant pâté en croûte online. All in all, I made a lot of mistakes, but I think it was worth it. Terrines are far easier, though, and great to do sous-vide (with vacuum bagging, you don't need to press the terrine).http://mundschenk.at/pate-en-croute-de-faisan/(The blog is in German, but the pictures should speak for themselves.)

My German is far from being enough to translate, but Google did a reasonable good job. Good enough that I really think I'llbe able to try this. Thanks...looks fabulous!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Beaver pate en croute:

attachicon.gifbeaver pate.jpg

The pastry was not one of my best; I think the flour was old and I had to add too much water to make it workable. Also, my only pate mold is a nonstick, and I've never gotten the sides to brown as well as I feel they should, in both a commercial and a home oven. Would an ordinary tinned steel mold make a difference?

I've ever eaten beaver...never even occurred to me!...what sort of taste & texture is it? And where does one source it?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally have a blog post about the making of that pheasant pâté en croûte online. All in all, I made a lot of mistakes, but I think it was worth it. Terrines are far easier, though, and great to do sous-vide (with vacuum bagging, you don't need to press the terrine).http://mundschenk.at/pate-en-croute-de-faisan/(The blog is in German, but the pictures should speak for themselves.)

My German is far from being enough to translate, but Google did a reasonable good job. Good enough that I really think I'llbe able to try this. Thanks...looks fabulous!

Thanks! Be sure to let me know how it turns out. If you are not sure about some ingredients or preparation steps, feel free to ask me. Unfortunately, multilingual WP blogs are kinda hard to set up, otherwise I'd translate the recipes at least.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Consider greasing the mold with butter and cook at a higher temp (425F) for the first 40-60 minutes, rotating half-way through. Then lower the

Thank you. I've had it at 425 for the first 20 minutes or so. I'll try it for longer. Do you have overcooking issues cooking it so hot, or does the crust keep the temperature inside it more moderate?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've ever eaten beaver...never even occurred to me!...what sort of taste & texture is it? And where does one source it?

It reminds me of very rich beef. There is little marbling but quite a bit of fat on the outside of the meat. It is deep red. I get it from a friend who traps in the winter. I typically cook the backstrap hot, fast, and rare and braise the hind quarter. I have smoked it before the braise as well.

This really opened my eyes to the possibilities of game pâtés. You avoid the textural problems you can sometimes run into with game, smooth the flavor (which for some people can be too intense), and turn it into a ready-to-eat form that can serve considerably more people than many other methods of cooking. And people think it's cool.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 4 weeks later...

I need some advice for a lump crab meat terrine. I make a dish where i pile lump crab meat ontop a beef filet. The problem is the crab meat usually just falls off when cutting into the filet. I thought of making a terrine to add some structure, but i dont know what would be the best approach. I dont want to stray away from the main ingredient being crab, and i dont want this to be served cold either. I though of just folding egg whites into the lump crab pressing it into a mold and sous vide, but not sure the best approach and time/temp to use? I dont want it rubbery or too stiff.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...