Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Terrine Topic


bleudauvergne
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 5 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Pâté en croûte de Faisan and Terrine de chevreuil et canard:

1 - Pastete ganz.jpg

2 - Pastete aufgeschnitten.jpg

The terrine was made sous-vide while the pâté was cooked conventionally (too a core temperature a tad to high, I'd say, but all my recipe books were very conservative in that regard). The pâté includes dried figs stewed in port, as well as pistachios. Both were made with curing salt.

For the (campagne-style coarse grind) terrine I included some beef as a filler meat, but no lard, which left it not as unctuous as it ought to have been. A small amount of veal was included in addition to the pheasant meat in the pâté. The crust was made with suet (which I should have chopped more finely). Both tasted quite nice, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

maybe some other nut? for some reason I just cant stand them. but they appear often in terrines so someone thinks this adds something. and mortadella, etc. fortunately there are versions of The Mort w/o a fav. here

but your stuff really does look stunning!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The aforeposted pictures and a detailed recipe were assessed by the Pâté Croûte committee and was deemed up to snuff by Le President des Tocques Blanches (Christophe Marguin), securing me a place among the 12 finalists. I am the first (and so far only) American (though I am also a French citizen) to have qualified for the competition (the 4th edition) and will have the undesirable handicap of having traveled the farthest with 3 pâtés and accoutrements stowed at the mercy of baggage handlers on both sides of the Atlantic. I will compete (on behalf of Bryan Voltaggio's Range restaurant in Friendship Heights, Washington DC) against chefs from tiny kitchens and 7 Michelin star rated brigades then be judged by MOF’s and experts in the craft. Thank you to Egullet and its members for allowing me a venue to show my work.

Highlights from the past competitions:

CMPC 2009

CMPC 2010

2.0 Special Cocoa Edition:

8156040298_4acd451974_c.jpg

8156009537_29754cd8cb_c.jpg

8156041968_f97902efed_c.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

except for the posstaccios :blink: ,

Yum!

You don't like pistachios? I'm tempted to say "but they are the best part", but that's not quite true. I do think they add a nice textural element, though.

maybe some other nut? for some reason I just cant stand them. but they appear often in terrines so someone thinks this adds something. and mortadella, etc. fortunately there are versions of The Mort w/o a fav. here

but your stuff really does look stunning!

I love to use pistachios also, but my chef is allergic to tree nuts so 95% of the time I have to substitute to get that textural feel. whole or slightly crushed pumpkin seeds seem to work the best. Coarse ground pumpkin seeds tend to meld into the pate too much and sunflower seeds are a little too small also, perhaps roasted and used sparingly with confeed gizzards and hearts they would work well though.

The aforeposted pictures and a detailed recipe were assessed by the Pâté Croûte committee and was deemed up to snuff by Le President des Tocques Blanches (Christophe Marguin), securing me a place among the 12 finalists. I am the first (and so far only) American (though I am also a French citizen) to have qualified for the competition (the 4th edition) and will have the undesirable handicap of having traveled the farthest with 3 pâtés and accoutrements stowed at the mercy of baggage handlers on both sides of the Atlantic. I will compete (on behalf of Bryan Voltaggio's Range restaurant in Friendship Heights, Washington DC) against chefs from tiny kitchens and 7 Michelin star rated brigades then be judged by MOF’s and experts in the craft. Thank you to Egullet and its members for allowing me a venue to show my work.

Congratulations Baron! Good luck, I look forward to hearing about the competition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

except for the posstaccios :blink: ,

Yum!

You don't like pistachios? I'm tempted to say "but they are the best part", but that's not quite true. I do think they add a nice textural element, though.

maybe some other nut? for some reason I just cant stand them. but they appear often in terrines so someone thinks this adds something. and mortadella, etc. fortunately there are versions of The Mort w/o a fav. here

but your stuff really does look stunning!

I love to use pistachios also, but my chef is allergic to tree nuts so 95% of the time I have to substitute to get that textural feel. whole or slightly crushed pumpkin seeds seem to work the best. Coarse ground pumpkin seeds tend to meld into the pate too much and sunflower seeds are a little too small also, perhaps roasted and used sparingly with confeed gizzards and hearts they would work well though.

With pistachios, I think it's not just the textural element, but also the color. Sunflower seeds or even other nuts simply won't stand out the same way. Pumpkin should work in that regard, though. Personally, I would not crush them for use in a terrine or pâté.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed nothing contrasts as nicely as pistachio. green peppercorns are too dark. died cherries work nicely in that regard if the pate is light enough, but with lots of liver in tge pate its usually too red for that. I find that whole pumpkin seeds have a habit of finding their way to the outside of the forcemeat leading to undesirable slices with the seed falling out though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Looking for advice: Pre-novice at this...for Thanksgiving made the Country Pate from the Dean and Delucca cook book. I made it without too much forethought, going to my local butcher thinking they'd have pork fat. Ha! With a need to improvise, I purchased very fatty salt pork, removed the fat and substitued after soaking it to remove some of the salt. Cut the meat manually as suggested, and it turned out ok.

After reading much of this thread (and loving the pictures) I am now ready to try again. I have Bourdain's Les Halles cookbook and plan to do pate de campagne. Problem: Pork liver. My local, better grocer has veal liver and I purchased that on impulse when they did not have pork fat...now think it is likely too delicate a flavor, am I right? Would there be something better to use? These guys will save pork fat for me and have ordered that. They would not slice fat to line the mold, and had nothing they'd suggest.

After I made the original Thanksgiving pate I looked on line to see if I could purchase jawl fat (what the Dean and Delucca says is the best option) and in error purchased caul fat. Jowl, caul...know the difference now. I received 10 pounds of caul fat which I divided into small packets and have frozen. (available in the US on Amazon.com).

Also the D&D did not suggest weighing it down. It was tasty but crumbled, pieces did not stay together once sliced.

Thank you for any help. Making gravlax and sausage for Christmas and this will be a great addition!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looking for advice: Pre-novice at this...for Thanksgiving made the Country Pate from the Dean and Delucca cook book. I made it without too much forethought, going to my local butcher thinking they'd have pork fat. Ha! With a need to improvise, I purchased very fatty salt pork, removed the fat and substitued after soaking it to remove some of the salt. Cut the meat manually as suggested, and it turned out ok.

After reading much of this thread (and loving the pictures) I am now ready to try again. I have Bourdain's Les Halles cookbook and plan to do pate de campagne. Problem: Pork liver. My local, better grocer has veal liver and I purchased that on impulse when they did not have pork fat...now think it is likely too delicate a flavor, am I right? Would there be something better to use? These guys will save pork fat for me and have ordered that. They would not slice fat to line the mold, and had nothing they'd suggest.

After I made the original Thanksgiving pate I looked on line to see if I could purchase jawl fat (what the Dean and Delucca says is the best option) and in error purchased caul fat. Jowl, caul...know the difference now. I received 10 pounds of caul fat which I divided into small packets and have frozen. (available in the US on Amazon.com).

Also the D&D did not suggest weighing it down. It was tasty but crumbled, pieces did not stay together once sliced.

Thank you for any help. Making gravlax and sausage for Christmas and this will be a great addition!

Regarding the liver, I am sure that veal liver will work fine if you cannot find pork liver. Some people use chicken livers but I don't really care for the taste.

I would use the caul fat to wrap the terrine. In fact what I normally do is line the terrine mold with a large piece of caul fat, fill the mold with the pate mixture, and then fold the caul fat over the top. The recipe in Les Halles has this technique although the photo in the book shows pork fat rather than caul fat which is rather confusing.

You will still need some pork fat for the pate mixture. I get back fat from my butcher but if you cannot find it, a fatty piece of pork belly works fine too.

Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Winner of the 2012 World Pâté Croûte Championship: Yohan Lastre, La Tour d'Argent *

8249135182_604b6d2cec_z.jpg

8248068869_3434af9930_z.jpg

8248068387_5c0ee63563_z.jpg

Cyril Malard; Elle Ixir. Lyon

8248068499_ac1fff73ba_z.jpg

I finished 11 or 12th. Not sure since all remaining 7 competitors after the 4 prizes are grouped together.

8248069205_8c93e4273b_z.jpg

I was exposed to dizzying level of professionalism and experience and feel that I fell short. Having to bring my wares from so far away put me at a considerable disadvantage, perhaps more so without the ooh-la-la garnishes & flair (though presentation accounted for few of the 200 total points) and I picked #12 at random, placing me last in the tasting, at which point the judges may have had their fill. Judges included Regis Marcon (Le Clos de Cimes ***), 2011 winner Eric Desbordes (Le Bristol ***) and numerous MOF’s. My mistakes were significant, but at least my slices stayed together –another contestant’s aspic was too loose and the pastry collapsed when cut. First and foremost, my pastry (80pts) did not achieve enough color, likely a result of baking 3 at once, thereupon lowering the temperature of the oven. Had I cooked it longer at that temp, I would have risked overcooking the forcemeat. I did not have a consistent gap for the aspic either.

Upon speaking with Patrick Henriroux (La Pyramide **, MOF) he said that the judges prefer a chunkier forcemeat, and that I should have kept the gizzards whole. Keeping pace with the gin flavors I finished the slice with fleur de sel mixed with lime zest and ground juniper berries. M. Henriroux explained that juniper is not a flavor that the judges crave. Pickled cauliflower lightly dressed with an orange zest & confit fat soffrito didn’t compare to some of the Bocuse d’Or inspired garnishes put forth by other competitors, but wasn’t worth many points anyway. Lastly, I should have pulled the pâté out of the fridge earlier so that it would have been served at room temperature which otherwise mutes the flavors. Now I know better and being exposed to such work has been invaluable.

8248069145_dc191c6a92_z.jpg

Frédéric Cote; Au Colombier. Lyon

More pics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congratulations on being a non-French competitor! It shows a level of skill which is far above what others do. Well done to even get there in the first place. They've given you some great feedback and, from a personal perspective, I'd love to see you compete and move up the rankings next year.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Baron, congratulations for making it as far as you did. That was a very small number of worldwide finalists and you were among them, I hope you are proud.

How interesting that garnishes were so significant in the competition. I love and respect traditional French cuisine, but sometimes I wonder about priorities...Did you have the opportunity to sample some of the winning examples? I'd be very interested in your review of the competition, it does seem like a great learning experience.

One of these days I'll post one of my humble terrines. In the meantime, I hope you'll continue to share your beautiful creations with us.


Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I finally have a blog post about the making of that pheasant pâté en croûte online. All in all, I made a lot of mistakes, but I think it was worth it. Terrines are far easier, though, and great to do sous-vide (with vacuum bagging, you don't need to press the terrine).

http://mundschenk.at/pate-en-croute-de-faisan/

(The blog is in German, but the pictures should speak for themselves.)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

For Cochon555 DC 2013.

Prosciutto Cotto & Mortadella

Asparagus in blood aspic

and chicories in a smoked ham-hock vinaigrette.

-∞∞∞-

Leverpostej.

Danish-style liver terrine.

Salted and cured anchovies, a couple of marinated capers.

-∞∞∞-

Pâté en Croûte

It’s heart, tongue, fatback, pistachios and a few figs.

Some pickled rhubarb and mushrooms.

-∞∞∞-

Pork Belly Pojarski

Breaded and fried

Sauce gribiche

-∞∞∞-

L’Astet

Loins roasted with spring garlic.

Warm confit potatoes and rillettes

-∞∞∞-

Saucisson en Brioche

Clothbound cheddar sausage baked in a leaf lard brioche.

And cracklin’ whipped lardo.

1st 3 courses.

8633798964_2a00ee323a_z.jpg

Pâté en Croûte with pistachio inlay.

8633807804_9c0014c022_z.jpg

Prosciutto Cotto, Mortadella, Spalla Cotta and Saucisson en Brioche.

8633799064_91cd295431_z.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...