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The Terrine Topic


bleudauvergne
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Moby..The consomme gets reduced by about a third and then I pour it onto a half sheetpan with a silpat. When it's cool I use a plastic knife and cut cubes. I wish I had thought to take pictures, maybe next time. It looked like a standard galantine, with a duck breast inlay and duck farce studded with balsamic onion and diced apple. The only thing I will do differently next time is cold smoke it for a bit after it is cooled, I still am not completely fond of plain, cold chicken skin. Your duck terrine looks excellent (awesome pistachio crust!) but you do have the thick fat outer layer I was talking about. Try it with Chicken skin next time and make the stock afterwards, you'll have a great soup to go with a killer galantine.

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  • 10 months later...

Bump again!

Just read this thread through, fantastic education for me, thanks you all. I think this way of preparing meats and offal has almost limitless possibilities. What I have seen here is a very far cry from the "mock chicken loaf with green olives and macaroni" I remember seeing at the grocery store as a kid. I did not grow up in France.

So, at the risk of riling up the haute cuisine traditionalists and the culinary Luddites out there . . . why not replace the bain marie with a sous vide approach. I could image a vacuum bag of delicious flavours coming together over time, and then maybe rolled into a crust or something. A well-evacuated bag would transfer lots of pressure to the cooking mixture, even afterward as it cools.

Just a thought.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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  • 3 weeks later...

Terrine of pork and veal flavored with vin de noix and a little brandy. I made this to snack on while cooking for thanksgiving last week. The definition is made of soaked cranberries, pistachios and strips of veal. I wrapped this one with blanched leeks.

BTW, Peter the sous vide idea is good, but not exactly new. Many traditional emulsified sausages (a terrine is more or less that) are cooked by gentle poaching. A galantine or ballotine comes to mind as does mortadella.

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E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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BTW, Peter the sous vide idea is good, but not exactly new. Many traditional emulsified sausages (a terrine is more or less that) are cooked by gentle poaching. A galantine or ballotine comes to mind as does mortadella.

When it comes to food, I'll take good over new any day.

There aren't many truly new ideas in the kitchen, I don't think. New ingredients are rare; show me a plant or animal nobody has tried to eat! That leaves equipment and technique. Electricity, plastics, refrigeration, lasers . . . thats what leads to a food revolution.

I feel a new thread coming on . . .

BTW FoodMan, your pork and veal terrine looks delicious. I love the cross section, with leek on the outside.

I made this duck liver pate last week:

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Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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  • 10 months later...
Bump again!

Just read this thread through, fantastic education for me, thanks you all. I think this way of preparing meats and offal has almost limitless possibilities. What I have seen here is a very far cry from the "mock chicken loaf with green olives and macaroni" I remember seeing at the grocery store as a kid. I did not grow up in France.

So, at the risk of riling up the haute cuisine traditionalists and the culinary Luddites out there . . . why not replace the bain marie with a sous vide approach. I could image a vacuum bag of delicious flavours coming together over time, and then maybe rolled into a crust or something. A well-evacuated bag would transfer lots of pressure to the cooking mixture, even afterward as it cools.

Just a thought.

My understanding is that the Troisgros boys first started using sous vide (I mean that they were literally the first non-industrial commercial kitchen to use it) as a way of controlling fat loss from their foie terrines.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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That looks really great. I'm trying to do the same thing today (althoguh I still haven't got a stupid mold) except with a torchon of foie down the middle.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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This is my first post, so please forgive my newbie'ness. I am hoping to start my first really tasty gelatinous stock to make terrine's. Is there any degree of measurement of "reducement"? Or is it just by taste, as in, -however much I would flavor an X amount of liquid with?? I have a very good source in Houston of many different bones and am very familiar with breakdown of animals, just need a little nudging. And, if anyone in Houston or near there needs help with any sourcing I can help with, let me know!

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Take a spoon full of the stock, place on small plate, put plate in fridge. After several minutes, when cold, examine to see if stock has begun to gel or if it's still just thin and runny.

Add experience plus gelatinous things to your stocks like pig trotters and you'll get there in no time.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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This worked out well, although the tube of foie collapsed slightly in the cooking. It enabled me to add a game bird gelee (pigeon, grouse, partridge, woodcock) which was great.

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http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3034/297694..._5ff8abdcdb.jpg

ETA: again adapted Culnary Bears gibier farce (posted above somewhere), substituting some chx livers for pigeon and a little foie. Also I approximated a quatre epice with some nutmeg, cloves and a little ginger.

Also his pastry recipe:

pastry :

570g bread flour

45g milk powder

7g baking powder

15g salt

100g lard (I used duck fat)

75g butter

2 eggs

tbsp vinegar

250g milk

Put dry ingredients in food processor, blitz, add fats, blitz to rub in, add eggs and vinegar, blitz for a few seconds to combine. Add milk slowly until dough forms - you may need a little more.

Roll out pastry to 4mm thick and line terrine. Line with backfat. Fill with mix, fold fatback over, place pastry rectangle on top and tuck in. Eggwash and cut vents.

Cook in 150C oven for an hour and fifteen minutes. If you're using a probe, it should be about 72C internally.

Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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That is glorious!

What ever happened to Culinary Bear, he's from my part of the world but don't see him around anymore. Have wondred where he works in Lancashire, anyome know?

“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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  • 3 months later...

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This past week I've been making a "the devil made me do it" terrine full of wild ingredients. Guinea fowl, pork throat, chestnuts, and a secret chocolate ingredient which I am loathe to disclose lest you all kick me out of eG. The recipe is long but not complicated, and you can find it here.

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This past week I've been making a "the devil made me do it" terrine full of wild ingredients.  Guinea fowl, pork throat, chestnuts, and a secret chocolate ingredient which I am loathe to disclose lest you all kick me out of eG.  The recipe is long but not complicated, and you can find it here.

Abra, this seems like a perfect excuse to do some baking. I have a question about one of the other ingredients though. I may be wrong, because I certainly have never looked for it before, but I have a hard time imagining that I will find pork throat at my grocery store here in southern California. And I have no idea what type of meat it is. Can you recommend a substitute?
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Oh dear, Nibor, I really don't know. The throat is just that, not the inside where you swallow, but the outer portion that hangs under the jaw of the pig. It's very fat, maybe as much as 85% fat, supposedly very flavorful, and from what I've read it's a principal ingredient in most French patés and sausages. It adds fat to the mixture that doesn't melt out in the cooking, thereby producing a creamy texture. Now that I have access to it I realize why terrines and patés I made in the US never had the "right" texture or mouthfeel.

That said, American pigs all have throats, and that meat must be available somewhere. I'd start by asking a good butcher, and if you have no luck there, maybe make the rounds of some ethnic markets.

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Oh dear, Nibor, I really don't know.  The throat is just that, not the inside where you swallow, but the outer portion that hangs under the jaw of the pig.  It's very fat, maybe as much as 85% fat, supposedly very flavorful, and from what I've read it's a principal ingredient in most French patés and sausages.  It adds fat to the mixture that doesn't melt out in the cooking, thereby producing a creamy texture.  Now that I have access to it I realize why terrines and patés I made in the US never had the "right" texture or mouthfeel.

That said, American pigs all have throats, and that meat must be available somewhere.  I'd start by asking a good butcher, and if you have no luck there, maybe make the rounds of some ethnic markets.

Fat! Yum. OK, I will start looking. I used to make 2 duck terrines every other week, on the day before my cleaning lady came (what a mess). I froze slices and then could have one, sauteed in a little butter, for breakfast or a snack. I am feeling inspired, so maybe I will start up by terrine routine again.

In the meantime I am watching my red wine + mother, hoping to get vinegar. You were right, of course - it does not smell bad.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I want to make a terrine for the 1st time and would like to follow this recipe:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database...ith_85947.shtml

He uses 2 pig's trotters (I presume instead of gelatine). On this occassion I do not want to use pigs trotters. Can anyone familiar with gelatine leaves tell me how many I'd need instead of the trotters? The recipe is for a 1.5 litre terrine mould.

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  • 9 months later...
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